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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘文奇 大小:tEd3nAgf62154KB 下载:9ckPG7rH90041次
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日期:2020-08-09 05:12:41
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塞巴斯蒂安-拉尔森

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Being aboord the Carrack, they had a Cabine and small bedconveniently allowed them, where they slept together, that theymight the better be reputed as man and wife; for, to passeotherwise, would have beene very dangerous to them both. Andquestionlesse, their faithfull promise made at Rhodes to Antiochus,sickenesse on the Sea, and mutuall respect they had of each otherscredit, was a constant restraint to all wanton desires, and a motiverather to incite Chastitie, then otherwise, and so (I hope) you areperswaded of them. But howsoever, the windes blewe merrily, theCarracke sayled lustily, and (by this time) they are arrived at Baffa,where the Cyprian Merchant dwelt, and where shee continued a longwhile with him, no one knowing otherwise, but that shee was his wifeindeede.Now it fortuned, that there arrived also at the same Baffa (aboutsome especiall occasions of his) a Gentleman whose name was Antigonus,well stept into yeeres, and better stored with wisedome then wealth:because by medling in many matters, while hee followed the serviceof the King of Cyprus, Fortune had beene very adverse to him. Thisancient Gentleman, passing (on a day) by the house where the Lady lay,and the Merchant being gone about his bussinesse into Armenia: heechanced to see the Lady at a window of the house, and because shee wasvery beautifull, he observed her the more advisedly, recollectinghis sences together, that (doubtlesse) he had seene her before, but inwhat place hee could not remember. The Lady her selfe likewise, whohad so long time beene Fortunes tennis ball, and the terme of her manymiseries drawing now neere an ending: began to conceive (upon the veryfirst sight of Antigonus) that she had formerly seene him inAlexandria, serving her Father in place of great degree. Heereupon,a sodaine hope perswaded her, that by the advice and furtherance ofthis Gentleman, shee should recover her wonted Royall condition: andopportunity now aptly fitting her, by the absence of her pretendedMerchant-husband, shee sent for him, requesting to have a few wordswith him.
2.  The night being over-past with infinite feares and afrights, andbright day saluting the world againe, with the expence of ninehoures and more, she fell to her former fruitlesse travailes. Beingsomewhat sharply bitten with hunger, because the former day andnight shee had not tasted any foode: shee made therefore a benefitof necessity, and fed on the greene hearbes so well as she could,not without any piercing afflictions, what should become of her inthis extraordinary misery. As shee walked in these pensivemeditations, she saw a Goate enter into a Cave, and (within a whileafter) come forth againe, wandring along thorow the woods. Whereuponshe stayed, and entred where she saw the beast issue foorth, where shefound two young Kids, yeaned (as it seemed) the selfesame day, whichsight was very pleasing to her, and nothing in that distresse couldmore content her.
3.  OTHER PERSONS ARE OR OUGHT TO BE APPOINTED, BUT SUCH AS BE HONEST,
4.  THE THIRD DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
5.  This soveraigne Unction was of such vertue (though Galen speakes nota word thereof among all his cheefest Medicines) and so farreprevailed, that the terrible threatning words of fire and faggot,became meerly frozen up, and gracious language blew a more gentleand calmer ayre; the Inquisitor delivering him an hallowedCrucifixe, creating him a Soldier of the Crosse (because he hadpayed Crosses good store for it,) and even as if he were to travellunder that Standard to the holy Land; so did hee appoint him ahome-paying pennance, namely, to visit him thrice every weeke in hisChamber, and to annoint his hands with the selfe-same yellowunguent, and afterward, to heare Masse of the holy Crosse, visitinghim also at dinner time, which being ended, to do nothing all the restof the day, but according as he directed him.
6.  This window, which we now looke forth at, sheweth thee a smal woodor thicket of trees, being litle more then the quarter of a milesdistance hence; whereto Nathan usually walketh every morning, andthere continueth time long enough: there maist thou very easily meethim, and do whatsoever thou intendest to him. If thou kilst him,because thou maist with safety returne home unto thine owne abiding,take not the same way which guided thee thither, but another, lying onthe left hand, and directing speedily out of the wood, as being not somuch haunted as the other, but rather free from all resort, and surestfor visiting thine owne countrey, after such a dismall deed is done.

计划指导

1.  Then every one could presently say, that Signior Guido had spokennothing but the truth, and were much ashamed of their owne folly,and shallow estimation which they had made of Guido, desiring nevermore after to meddle with him so grossely, and thanking Signior Betto,for so well reforming their ignorance, by his much betterapprehension.
2.  Thus the idle and loose love of Restagnone, with the frantickerage and jealousie of Ninetta and Folco, overturned all their longcontinued happinesse, and threw a disastrous ending on them all.
3.  SERVING AS AN ADMONITION TO ALL LADIES AND GENTLEWOMEN, NOT TO
4.  THE THIRD DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
5.  Having spent all the night with her in wanton dalliances, andbeing risen in the morning; to enflame his affection more and moretowards her, and to prevent any ill opinion he might conceyve ofher, she bestowed a rich and costly Girdle on him, as also a purssemost curiously wrought, saying to him. My sweet Salabetto, withthese testimonies of my true affection to thee, I give thee faithfullyto understand, that as my person is onely subjected thine; so thishouse and all the riches in it, remaineth absolutely at thydisposition, or whatsoever hereafter shal happen within the compasseof my power.
6.  When the Queene perceived, that Madame Aemillia was discharged ofher Novell, and none remained now to speake next, but onely her selfe,his priviledge alwayes remembred, to whom it belonged to be thelast, she began in this manner.

推荐功能

1.  The Abbot comming from his Chamber to enter the Hall, lookingabout him, as hee was wont to doe; the first man hee saw was Primasso,who being but in homely habite, and he having not seene him beforeto his remembrance, a present bad conceite possessed his braine,that he never saw an unworthier person, saying within himselfe: Seehow I give my goods away to bee devoured. So returning backe to hisChamber againe; commaunded the doore to be made fast, demaunding ofevery man neere about him, if they knew the base Knave that satebefore his entrance into the Hall, and all his servants answered no.Primasso being extreamely hungry, with travailing on foote so farre,and never used to fast so long; expecting still when meate would beserved in, and that the Abbot came not at all: drew out one of hisloaves which hee brought with him, and very heartily fell to feeding.
2.  Why should I live despisde in every place?
3.  Chynon being now wounded to the heart (where never any civillinstruction could before get entrance) with loves piercing dart, bythe bright beauty of Iphigenia, mooved much admiration (falling fromone change to another) in his Father, Kindred, and all else thatknew him. For first, he requested of his Father, that he might behabited and respected like to his other Brethren, whereto right gladlyhe condiscended. And frequenting the company of civill youths,observing also the cariage of Gentlemen, especially such as wereamorously enclined: he grew to a beginning in short time (to thewonder of every one) not onely to understand the first instructionof letters, but also became most skilfull, even amongst them that werebest exercised in Philosophy. And afterward, love to Iphigenia beingthe sole occasion of this happy alteration, not onely did his harshand clownish voyce convert it selfe more mildely, but also heebecame a singular Musitian, and could perfectly play on anyinstrument. Beside, he tooke delight in the riding and managing ofgreat horses, and finding himselfe of a strong and able body, heexercised all kinds of Military Disciplines, as well by Sea, as on theland. And, to be breefe, because I would not seeme tedious in therepetition of all his vertues, scarsly had he attained to the fourthyeare, after he was thus falne in love, but hee became generallyknowne, to be the most civil, wise, and worthy Gentleman, aswell forall vertues enriching the minde, as any whatsoever to beautifie thebody, that very hardly he could be equalled throughout the wholekingdome of Cyprus.What shall we say then (vertuous Ladies) concerning this Chynon?Surely nothing else, but that those high and divine vertues, infusedinto his gentle soule, were by envious Fortune bound and shut up insome small angle of his intellect, which being shaken and set atliberty by love, (as having a farre more potent power then Fortune, inquickning and reviving the dull drowsie spirits) declared his mightyand soveraigne Authority, in setting free so many faire and preciousvertues unjustly detayned, to let the worlds eye behold them truly, bymanifest testimony from whence he can deliver those spiritssubjected to his power, and guid them (afterward) to the highestdegrees of honour. And although Chynon by affecting Iphigenia,failed in some particular things; yet notwithstanding, his FatherAristippus duely considering, that love had made him a man, whereas(before) he was no better then a beast: not onely endured allpatiently, but also advised him therein, to take such courses asbest liked himselfe. Neverthelesse, Chynon (who refused to be calledGalesus, which was his naturall name indeed) remembring that Iphigeniatearmed him Chynon, and coveting (under this title) to accomplishthe issue of his honest amorous desire: made many motions toCiphaeus the Father of Iphigenia, that he would be pleased to lethim enjoy her in marriage. But Ciphaeus told him, that he hadalready passed his promise for her, to a Gentleman of Rhodes, namedPasimondo, which promise he religiously intended to performe.
4.  Sinne and shame can never be so closely carryed, or clouded with thegreatest cunning; but truth hath a loop-light whereby to discoverit, even when it supposeth it selfe in the surest safety. For, onthe very day of her detiverance, at such time as the Mother, andsome few friends (sworne to secrecy) were about the businesse, SigniorAmarigo, having beene in company of other Gentlemen, to flye his Hawkeat the River, upon a sudden, (but very unfortunately, albeit hee wasalone by himselfe) stept into his Farm-house, even to the next roomewhere the women were, and heard the newborne Babe to cry, whereatmarvelling not a little, he called for his Wife, to know what youngchilde cryed in his House. The Mother, amazed at his strange commingthither, which never before he had used to doe, and pittying thewofull distresse of her Daughter, which now could bee no longercovered, revealed what happened to Violenta. But he, being nothingso rash in beliefe, as his Wife was, made answere, that it wasimpossible for his Daughter to be conceived with childe, because henever observed the least signe of love in her to any man whatsoever,and therefore he would be satisfied in the truth, as shee expected anyfavour from him, or else there was no other way but death.
5.   It is not unknowne to you, partly by intelligence from ourreverend predecessours, as also some understanding of your owne,that many time have resorted to our City of Florence, Potestates andOfficers, belonging to the Marquesate of Anconia; who commonly weremen of lowe spirit, and their lives so wretched and penurious, as theyrather deserved to be tearmed Misers, then men. And in regard ofthis their naturall covetousnesse and misery, the Judges would bringalso in their company, such Scribes or Notaries, as being paraleldewith their Masters: they all seemed like Swaines come from the Plough,or bred up in some Coblers quality, rather then Schollers, or Studentsof Law.
6.  Already began certaine small Clouds in the West, to blush with aVermillion tincture, when those in the East (having reached to theirfull heighth) looked like bright burnished Gold, by splendour of theSun beames drawing neere unto them: when Pamphilus being risen, causedthe Ladies, and the rest of his honourable companions to be called.When they were all assembled, and had concluded together on the place,whither they should walke for their mornings recreation: the Kingledde on the way before accompanied with the two Noble LadiesPhilomena and Fiammetta, all the rest following after them,devising, talking, and answering to divers demands both what thatday was to be don, as also concerning the proposed imposition forthe forthcoming day.

应用

1.  After that Madame Eliza had made an end of her Song, which sheesealed up with an heart-breaking sigh: they all sate amazedlywondering at her moanes, not one among them being able toconjecture, what should be the reason of her singing in this manner.But the King being in a good and pleasing temper, calling Tindaro,commaunded him to bring his Bagge-pipe, by the sound whereof theydanced divers daunces: And a great part of the night being spent inthis manner, they all gave over, and departed to their Chambers.
2.  Maestro Simone, an ydle-headed Doctor of Physicke, was throwne byBruno and Buffalmaco, into a common Leystall of Filth: The Physitianfondly beleeving, that (in the night time) he should bee made one of anew created Company, who usually went to see wonders at Corsica; andthere in the Leystall they left him.
3.  Three young Gentlemen, being Brethren, and having spent all theirLands and possessions vainely, became poore. A Nephew of theirs(falling almost into as desperate a condition) became acquaintedwith an Abbot, whom he afterward found to be the King of EnglandsDaughter, and made him her Husband in mariage, recompencing all hisUncles losses, and seating them againe in good estate.
4、  Tancrede, Prince of Salerne (which City, before the Consulles ofRome held dominion in that part of Italy, stoode free, and thence(perchance) tooke the moderne title of a Principality was a veryhumane Lord, and of ingenious nature; if, in his elder yeeres, hehad not soiled his hands in the blood of Lovers, especially one ofthem, being both neere and deere unto him. So it fortuned, that duringthe whole life time of this Prince, he had but one onely daughter(albeit it had beene much better, if he had had at all) whom he sochoisely loved and esteemed, as never was any childe more deerelyaffected of a Father: and so farre extended his over-curious respectof her, as he would seldome admit her to be forth of his sight;neither would he suffer her to marry, although she had outstept (bydivers yeeres) the age meete for marriage.
5、  THE SONG

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网友评论(pxQEmRAH36542))

  • 陈卫东 08-08

      THE INDUCTION TO THE THIRD DAY

  • 汪东城 08-08

      As I have heeretofore heard (Gracious Ladies) there lived awealthy Marchant in Paris, being a Mercer, or seller of Silkes,named Jehannot de Chevigny, a man of faithfull, honest, and uprightdealing; who held great affection and friendship with a very rich Jew,named Abraham, that was a Merchant also, and a man of very directconversation. Jehannot well noting the honesty and loyall dealing ofthis Jew, began to have a Religious kinde of compassion in hissoule, much pittying that a man so good in behaviour, so wise anddiscreete in all his actions, should be in danger of perditionthorow want of Faith. In which regard, lovingly he began to intreatehim, that he would leave the errors of his Jewish beleefe, andfollow the truth of Christianity, which he evidently saw (as beinggood and holy) daily to prosper and enlarge it selfe, whereas on thecontrary, his profession decreased, and grew to nothing.

  • 斯基普·考克斯 08-08

       The Pilgrime discoursed to her, even from the one end to theother, the history of her husbands sad disasters, telling her, howmany yeeres since she was espoused to him, and many other importantmatters, which well shee knew, and was greatly amazed thereat,thinking him verily to be a Prophet, and kneeling at his feete,entreated him very earnestly, that if he were come to deliver herFather Aldobrandino from death, to doe it speedily, because the timewas very short. The Pilgrime appearing to be a man of great holinesse,saide. Rise up Madame, refraine from weeping, and observeattentively what I shall say; yet with this caution, that you neverreveale it to any person whatsoever. This tribulation whereinto youare falne, (as by revelation I am faithfully informed) is for agrievous sinne by you heretofore committed, whereof divine mercy iswilling to purge you, and to make a perfect amends by a sensiblefeeling of this affliction; as seeking your sound and absoluterecovery, least you fall into farre greater danger then before. Goodman (quoth shee) I am burthened with many sinnes, and doe not know forwhich any amends should be made by me; any one sooner then other:wherefore if you have intelligence thereof, for charities sake tell itme, and I will doe so much as lieth in me, to make a full satisfactionfor it. Madame, answered the Pilgrime, I know well enough what itis, and will demand it no more of you, to winne any furtherknowledge thereof, then I have already: but because in revealing ityour selfe, it may touch you with the more true compunction ofsoule; let us goe to the point indeede, and tell mee, doe youremember, that at any time you were married to an Husband, or no?

  • 亚历杭德罗·埃切瓦里亚及台长马里奥·罗德里格斯·巴尔 08-08

      The Physitian interrupting him bashfully, turned himselfe untoBruno, saying. Did not I tell thee this before? Observe what a notablething it is, to speake well, and to frequent the company of theWise. A thousand other, meerely blockes and dullardes by Nature, couldnever so soone comprehend all the particularities of my knowledge,as this honest and apprehensive man hath done. Thou didst not searchinto it halfe so soone, nor (indeed) did I expresse a quarter of myingenuity to thee, as (since his comming) hath prodigally flownefrom me.

  • 霍尔 08-07

    {  For truth lives not in men:

  • 陈冬梅 08-06

      And all sung Beauties praise.}

  • 尚大军 08-06

      Magdalena, having acquainted her Husband with her vertuousintention, for preserving her Sisters life, and disappointing the Dukein his wicked desire; was as contrary to her true meaning in thiscase, as Ninetta had formerly beene adverse to Restagnone, onely beingover-ruled likewise by jealousie, and perswaded in his rash opinion,that the Duke had already dishonoured Magdalena, otherwise, he wouldnot have delivered Ninetta out of prison. Mad fury gave further fireto this unmanly perswasion, and nothing will now quench this but thelife of poore Magdalena, suddenly sacrificed in the rescue of herSister, such a divell is anger, when the understandings bright eyeis thereby abused. No credit might bee given to her womanlyprotestations, or any thing seeme to alter his bloody purpose; but,having slaine Magdalena with his Poniard (notwithstanding her tearesand humble entreaties) he ranne in haste to Ninettaes Chamber, she notdreaming on any such desperate accident, and to her he used thesedissembling speeches.

  • 马愉乐 08-06

      Sister (quoth he) my wife hath advised, that I should speedilyconvey you hence, as fearing the renewing of the Dukes fury, andyour falling againe into the hands of justice: I have a Barkereadily prepared for you, and your life being secured, it is allthat she and I doe most desire. Ninetta being fearefull, and no waydistrusting what he had saide; in thankfull allowance of her Sisterscare, and curteous tender of his so ready service; departed thencepresently with him, not taking any farewell of her other Sister andher Husband. To the Seashore they came, very weakely provided ofmonies to defray their charges, and getting aboard the Barke, directedtheir course themselves knew not whether.

  • 蒋拓 08-05

       Let me tell you moreover, woorthy Woman, that see me reverenced hereas Lord Abbot, yet am I but as other men are, and in regard I amneither aged, nor mishapen, me thinkes the motion I have made,should be the lesse offensive to you, and therefore the soonergranted. For, all the while as Ferando remaineth in Purgatory, doe youbut imagine him to be present with you, and your perswasion will themore absolutely be confirmed. No man can, or shall be privy to ourclose meetings, for I carry the same holy opinion among all men, asyou your selfe conceived of me, and none dare be so saucie, as to callin question whatsoever I doe or say, because my words are Oracles, andmine actions more than halfe miracles; doe you not then refuse sogracious an offer. Enow there are, who would gladly enjoy that,which is francke and freely presented to you, and which (if you be awise Woman) is meerely impossible for you to refuse. Richly am Ipossessed of Gold and Jewels, which shall be all yours, if youplease in favour to be mine, wherein I will not be gaine-saide, exceptyour selfe do deny me.

  • 尹施允 08-03

    {  Philostratus, gladly I do accept your gift; and to the end that yemay the better remember your selfe, concerning what you have donehitherto: I will and command, that generall preparation be madeagainst to morrow, for faire and happy fortunes hapning to Lovers,after former cruell and unkinde accidents. Which proposition wasvery pleasing to them all.

  • 李子侠 08-03

      She having delivered this message to her Mistresse, was presentlyreturned backe againe to him, to let him understand, in which of theBathes she meant to meet him, on the next morrow in the evening.This being counsell for himselfe onely to keepe, he imparted it not toany friend whatsoever; but when the houre for their meeting wascome, he went unto the place where he was appointed, a Bathe(belike) best agreeing with such businesse.

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