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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:石华 大小:fkMNEJGX18379KB 下载:OXnWJRmD20876次
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日期:2020-08-03 18:07:52
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杨宇军

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Madam;" answered Ulysses, "who on the face of the whole earth candare to chide with you? Your fame reaches the firmament of heavenitself; you are like some blameless king, who upholds righteousness,as the monarch over a great and valiant nation: the earth yields itswheat and barley, the trees are loaded with fruit, the ewes bringforth lambs, and the sea abounds with fish by reason of his virtues,and his people do good deeds under him. Nevertheless, as I sit here inyour house, ask me some other question and do not seek to know my raceand family, or you will recall memories that will yet more increase mysorrow. I am full of heaviness, but I ought not to sit weeping andwailing in another person's house, nor is it well to be thusgrieving continually. I shall have one of the servants or evenyourself complaining of me, and saying that my eyes swim with tearsbecause I am heavy with wine."
2.  "We soon reached his cave, but he was out shepherding, so we wentinside and took stock of all that we could see. His cheese-rackswere loaded with cheeses, and he had more lambs and kids than his penscould hold. They were kept in separate flocks; first there were thehoggets, then the oldest of the younger lambs and lastly the veryyoung ones all kept apart from one another; as for his dairy, allthe vessels, bowls, and milk pails into which he milked, were swimmingwith whey. When they saw all this, my men begged me to let themfirst steal some cheeses, and make off with them to the ship; theywould then return, drive down the lambs and kids, put them on boardand sail away with them. It would have been indeed better if we haddone so but I would not listen to them, for I wanted to see theowner himself, in the hope that he might give me a present. When,however, we saw him my poor men found him ill to deal with.
3.  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.
4.  "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.
5.  "There you go," cried he, "and a precious pair you are. See howheaven brings birds of the same feather to one another. Where, pray,master swineherd, are you taking this poor miserable object? Itwould make any one sick to see such a creature at table. A fellow likethis never won a prize for anything in his life, but will go aboutrubbing his shoulders against every man's door post, and begging,not for swords and cauldrons like a man, but only for a few scraps notworth begging for. If you would give him to me for a hand on mystation, he might do to clean out the folds, or bring a bit of sweetfeed to the kids, and he could fatten his thighs as much as he pleasedon whey; but he has taken to bad ways and will not go about any kindof work; he will do nothing but beg victuals all the town over, tofeed his insatiable belly. I say, therefore and it shall surely be- ifhe goes near Ulysses' house he will get his head broken by thestools they will fling at him, till they turn him out."
6.  "Good heavens," said he, "see how the gods have saved this manfrom destruction. We kept a succession of scouts upon the headlandsall day long, and when the sun was down we never went on shore tosleep, but waited in the ship all night till morning in the hope ofcapturing and killing him; but some god has conveyed him home in spiteof us. Let us consider how we can make an end of him. He must notescape us; our affair is never likely to come off while is alive,for he is very shrewd, and public feeling is by no means all on ourside. We must make haste before he can call the Achaeans inassembly; he will lose no time in doing so, for he will be furiouswith us, and will tell all the world how we plotted to kill him, butfailed to take him. The people will not like this when they come toknow of it; we must see that they do us no hurt, nor drive us from ourown country into exile. Let us try and lay hold of him either on hisfarm away from the town, or on the road hither. Then we can divideup his property amongst us, and let his mother and the man who marriesher have the house. If this does not please you, and you wishTelemachus to live on and hold his father's property, then we must notgather here and eat up his goods in this way, but must make our offersto Penelope each from his own house, and she can marry the man whowill give the most for her, and whose lot it is to win her."

计划指导

1.  As she spoke Telemachus sneezed so loudly that the whole houseresounded with it. Penelope laughed when she heard this, and said toEumaeus, "Go and call the stranger; did you not hear how my sonsneezed just as I was speaking? This can only mean that all thesuitors are going to be killed, and that not one of them shall escape.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart: if I amsatisfied that the stranger is speaking the truth I shall give him ashirt and cloak of good wear."
2.  "Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mindto; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, whomakes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to hisown good pleasure. This fellow means no harm by singing theill-fated return of the Danaans, for people always applaud thelatest songs most warmly. Make up your mind to it and bear it; Ulyssesis not the only man who never came back from Troy, but many anotherwent down as well as he. Go, then, within the house and busyyourself with your daily duties, your loom, your distaff, and theordering of your servants; for speech is man's matter, and mineabove all others- for it is I who am master here."
3.  "Listen to me you suitors, who persist in abusing the hospitality ofthis house because its owner has been long absent, and without otherpretext than that you want to marry me; this, then, being the prizethat you are contending for, I will bring out the mighty bow ofUlysses, and whomsoever of you shall string it most easily and sendhis arrow through each one of twelve axes, him will I follow andquit this house of my lawful husband, so goodly, and so abounding inwealth. But even so I doubt not that I shall remember it in mydreams."
4.  "Father Jove," answered the stockman, "would indeed that you mightso ordain it. If some god were but to bring Ulysses back, you shouldsee with what might and main I would fight for him."
5.  Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."
6.  "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.

推荐功能

1.  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
2.  "I wish, child," answered Euryclea, "that you would take themanagement of the house into your own hands altogether, and look afterall the property yourself. But who is to go with you and light youto the store room? The maids would have so, but you would not letthem.
3.  Here they found the ghost of Achilles son of Peleus, with those ofPatroclus, Antilochus, and Ajax, who was the finest and handsomest manof all the Danaans after the son of Peleus himself.
4.  Every one assented, and Ulysses girded his old rags about his loins,thus baring his stalwart thighs, his broad chest and shoulders, andhis mighty arms; but Minerva came up to him and made his limbs evenstronger still. The suitors were beyond measure astonished, and onewould turn towards his neighbour saying, "The stranger has broughtsuch a thigh out of his old rags that there will soon be nothingleft of Irus."
5.   Eumaeus answered, "Old man, no traveller who comes here with newswill get Ulysses' wife and son to believe his story. Nevertheless,tramps in want of a lodging keep coming with their mouths full oflies, and not a word of truth; every one who finds his way to Ithacagoes to my mistress and tells her falsehoods, whereon she takes themin, makes much of them, and asks them all manner of questions,crying all the time as women will when they have lost theirhusbands. And you too, old man, for a shirt and a cloak woulddoubtless make up a very pretty story. But the wolves and birds ofprey have long since torn Ulysses to pieces, or the fishes of thesea have eaten him, and his bones are lying buried deep in sand uponsome foreign shore; he is dead and gone, and a bad business it isfor all his friends- for me especially; go where I may I shall neverfind so good a master, not even if I were to go home to my motherand father where I was bred and born. I do not so much care,however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see themagain in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves memost; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here nolonger, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me thatwhereever he may be I shall always honour his memory."
6.  BOOK XIII.

应用

1.  Telemachus answered boldly, for Minerva had given him courage to askabout his father and get himself a good name.
2.  On this she came down from her upper room, and while doing so sheconsidered whether she should keep at a distance from her husbandand question him, or whether she should at once go up to him andembrace him. When, however, she had crossed the stone floor of thecloister, she sat down opposite Ulysses by the fire, against thewall at right angles [to that by which she had entered], while Ulyssessat near one of the bearing-posts, looking upon the ground, andwaiting to see what his wife would say to him when she saw him. Fora long time she sat silent and as one lost in amazement. At one momentshe looked him full in the face, but then again directly, she wasmisled by his shabby clothes and failed to recognize him, tillTelemachus began to reproach her and said:
3.  Thus did Ulysses sleep, and the young men slept beside him. Butthe swineherd did not like sleeping away from his pigs, so he gotready to go and Ulysses was glad to see that he looked after hisproperty during his master's absence. First he slung his sword overhis brawny shoulders and put on a thick cloak to keep out the wind. Healso took the skin of a large and well fed goat, and a javelin in caseof attack from men or dogs. Thus equipped he went to his rest wherethe pigs were camping under an overhanging rock that gave them shelterfrom the North wind.
4、  "The man who had seduced her then said, 'Would you like to comealong with us to see the house of your parents and your parentsthemselves? They are both alive and are said to be well off.'
5、  Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.

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  • 马静关 08-02

      Meanwhile the daughter of Icarius, wise Penelope, had had had a richseat placed for her facing the court and cloisters, so that shecould hear what every one was saying. The dinner indeed had beenprepared amid merriment; it had been both good and abundant, forthey had sacrificed many victims; but the supper was yet to come,and nothing can be conceived more gruesome than the meal which agoddess and a brave man were soon to lay before them- for they hadbrought their doom upon themselves.

  • 欧力威 08-02

      As for Melanthius, they took him through the cloister into the innercourt. There they cut off his nose and his ears; they drew out hisvitals and gave them to the dogs raw, and then in their fury theycut off his hands and his feet.

  • 马仁山 08-02

       The old woman swore most solemnly that she would not, and when shehad completed her oath, she began drawing off the wine into jars,and getting the barley meal into the bags, while Telemachus wentback to the suitors.

  • 秦检 08-02

      Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."

  • 郝轶琦 08-01

    {  Then the other maids in the house rose and lit the fire on thehearth; Telemachus also rose and put on his clothes. He girded hissword about his shoulder, bound his sandals on his comely feet, andtook a doughty spear with a point of sharpened bronze; then he went tothe threshold of the cloister and said to Euryclea, "Nurse, did youmake the stranger comfortable both as regards bed and board, or didyou let him shift for himself?- for my mother, good woman though sheis, has a way of paying great attention to second-rate people, andof neglecting others who are in reality much better men."

  • 孙河地 07-31

      Then the swineherd and the stockman left the cloisters together, andUlysses followed them. When they had got outside the gates and theouter yard, Ulysses said to them quietly:}

  • 李屏东 07-31

      THEY reached the low lying city of Lacedaemon them where theydrove straight to the of abode Menelaus [and found him in his ownhouse, feasting with his many clansmen in honour of the wedding of hisson, and also of his daughter, whom he was marrying to the son of thatvaliant warrior Achilles. He had given his consent and promised her tohim while he was still at Troy, and now the gods were bringing themarriage about; so he was sending her with chariots and horses tothe city of the Myrmidons over whom Achilles' son was reigning. Forhis only son he had found a bride from Sparta, daughter of Alector.This son, Megapenthes, was born to him of a bondwoman, for heavenvouchsafed Helen no more children after she had borne Hermione, whowas fair as golden Venus herself.

  • 陈雪芳 07-31

      Then the suitors came in and took their places on the benches andseats. Forthwith men servants poured water over their hands, maidswent round with the bread-baskets, pages filled the mixing-bowlswith wine and water, and they laid their hands upon the good thingsthat were before them. As soon as they had had enough to eat and drinkthey wanted music and dancing, which are the crowning embellishmentsof a banquet, so a servant brought a lyre to Phemius, whom theycompelled perforce to sing to them. As soon as he touched his lyre andbegan to sing Telemachus spoke low to Minerva, with his head closeto hers that no man might hear.

  • 扎西次仁 07-30

       "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."

  • 李显 07-28

    {  "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'

  • 拉尔夫·劳伦 07-28

      Immediately afterwards Ulysses came inside, looking like a poormiserable old beggar, leaning on his staff and with his clothes all inrags. He sat down upon the threshold of ash-wood just inside the doorsleading from the outer to the inner court, and against abearing-post of cypress-wood which the carpenter had skillfullyplaned, and had made to join truly with rule and line. Telemachus tooka whole loaf from the bread-basket, with as much meat as he could holdin his two hands, and said to Eumaeus, "Take this to the stranger, andtell him to go the round of the suitors, and beg from them; a beggarmust not be shamefaced."

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