0 丰亿彩票下载-APP安装下载穆帅开发布会金句频出:我从未输过欧冠决赛

丰亿彩票下载 注册最新版下载

丰亿彩票下载 注册

丰亿彩票下载注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:朱斌 大小:7nNTBpNh86527KB 下载:X9IlHdDN35898次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:wAwejpFP90003条
日期:2020-08-10 08:38:05
安卓
周春盛

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  And as I sat, the birdes heark'ning thus, Me thought that I heard voices suddenly, The most sweetest and most delicious That ever any wight, I *trow truely,* *verily believe* Heard in their life; for the harmony And sweet accord was in so good musike, That the voices to angels' most were like.
2.  40. "All n'ere he malapert, nor made avow Nor was so bold to sing a foole's mass;" i.e. although he was not over-forward and made no confession (of his love), or was so bold as to be rash and ill-advised in his declarations of love and worship.
3.  18. Dardanus: the mythical ancestor of the Trojans, after whom the gate is supposed to be called.
4.  "And yonder have I heard full lustily My deare hearte laugh; and yonder play: Saw I her ones eke full blissfully; And yonder ones to me gan she say, 'Now, goode sweete! love me well, I pray;' And yond so gladly gan she me behold, That to the death my heart is to her hold.* *holden, bound
5.  For they had seen her ever virtuous, And loving Hermegild right as her life: Of this bare witness each one in that house, Save he that Hermegild slew with his knife: This gentle king had *caught a great motife* *been greatly moved Of this witness, and thought he would inquere by the evidence* Deeper into this case, the truth to lear.* *learn
6.  Upon his biere lay this innocent Before the altar while the masses last';* *lasted And, after that, th' abbot with his convent Have sped them for to bury him full fast; And when they holy water on him cast, Yet spake this child, when sprinkled was the water, And sang, O Alma redemptoris mater!

计划指导

1.  Thus hath Avaunter blowen ev'rywhere All that he knows, and more a thousand fold; His ancestry of kin was to Lier,* *Liar For first he maketh promise for to hold His lady's counsel, and it not unfold; -- Wherefore, the secret when he doth unshit,* *disclose Then lieth he, that all the world may wit.* *know
2.  Aurelian, when that the governance Of Rome came into his handes tway, <15> He shope* upon this queen to do vengeance; *prepared And with his legions he took his way Toward Zenobie, and, shortly for to say, He made her flee, and at the last her hent,* *took And fetter'd her, and eke her children tway, And won the land, and home to Rome he went.
3.  But in effect, and shortly for to say, This Diomede all freshly new again Gan pressen on, and fast her mercy pray; And after this, the soothe for to sayn, Her glove he took, of which he was full fain, And finally, when it was waxen eve, And all was well, he rose and took his leave.
4.  2. Camuse: flat; French "camuse", snub-nosed.
5.  18. Dardanus: the mythical ancestor of the Trojans, after whom the gate is supposed to be called.
6.  57. Assayed: experienced, tasted. See note 6 to the Squire's Tale.

推荐功能

1.  *Kalendares illumined* be they *brilliant exemplars* That in this world be lighted with thy name; And whoso goeth with thee the right way, Him shall not dread in soule to be lame; Now, Queen of comfort! since thou art the same To whom I seeke for my medicine, Let not my foe no more my wound entame;* *injure, molest My heal into thy hand all I resign.
2.  5. Cordewane: Cordovan; fine Spanish leather, so called from the name of the city where it was prepared
3.  15. For great skill is he proved that he wrought: for it is most reasonable that He should prove or test that which he made.
4.  "Madame," quoth I, "if that I durst enquere Of you, I would fain, of that company, Wit what they be that pass'd by this herbere? And she again answered right friendly: "My faire daughter, all that pass'd hereby In white clothing, be servants ev'ry one Unto the Leaf; and I myself am one.
5.   Thus plained Dorigen a day or tway, Purposing ever that she woulde dey;* *die But natheless upon the thirde night Home came Arviragus, the worthy knight, And asked her why that she wept so sore. And she gan weepen ever longer more. "Alas," quoth she, "that ever I was born! Thus have I said," quoth she; "thus have I sworn. " And told him all, as ye have heard before: It needeth not rehearse it you no more. This husband with glad cheer,* in friendly wise, *demeanour Answer'd and said, as I shall you devise.* *relate "Is there aught elles, Dorigen, but this?" "Nay, nay," quoth she, "God help me so, *as wis* *assuredly* This is too much, an* it were Godde's will." *if "Yea, wife," quoth he, "let sleepe what is still, It may be well par'venture yet to-day. Ye shall your trothe holde, by my fay. For, God so wisly* have mercy on me, *certainly *I had well lever sticked for to be,* *I had rather be slain* For very love which I to you have, But if ye should your trothe keep and save. Truth is the highest thing that man may keep." But with that word he burst anon to weep, And said; "I you forbid, on pain of death, That never, while you lasteth life or breath, To no wight tell ye this misaventure; As I may best, I will my woe endure, Nor make no countenance of heaviness, That folk of you may deeme harm, or guess." And forth he call'd a squier and a maid. "Go forth anon with Dorigen," he said, "And bringe her to such a place anon." They take their leave, and on their way they gon: But they not wiste why she thither went; He would to no wight telle his intent.
6.  "Now," quoth our Host, "I will no longer play With thee, nor with none other angry man." But right anon the worthy Knight began (When that he saw that all the people lough*), *laughed "No more of this, for it is right enough. Sir Pardoner, be merry and glad of cheer; And ye, Sir Host, that be to me so dear, I pray you that ye kiss the Pardoner; And, Pardoner, I pray thee draw thee ner,* *nearer And as we didde, let us laugh and play." Anon they kiss'd, and rode forth their way.

应用

1.  27. Cornemuse: bagpipe; French, "cornemuse." Shawmies: shalms or psalteries; an instrument resembling a harp.
2.  "Hide, Absolon, thy gilte* tresses clear; *golden Esther, lay thou thy meekness all adown; Hide, Jonathan, all thy friendly mannere, Penelope, and Marcia Catoun,<14> Make of your wifehood no comparisoun; Hide ye your beauties, Isoude <15> and Helene; My lady comes, that all this may distain.* *outdo, obscure
3.  And with this word he right anon Hent* me up betwixt his tone,** *caught **toes And at a window in me brought, That in this house was, as me thought; And therewithal me thought it stent,* *stopped And nothing it aboute went; And set me in the floore down. But such a congregatioun Of folk, as I saw roam about, Some within and some without, Was never seen, nor shall be eft,* *again, hereafter That, certes, in the world n' is* left *is not So many formed by Nature, Nor dead so many a creature, That well unnethes* in that place *scarcely Had I a foote breadth of space; And ev'ry wight that I saw there Rown'd* evereach in other's ear *whispered A newe tiding privily, Or elles told all openly Right thus, and saide, "Know'st not thou What is betid,* lo! righte now?" *happened "No," quoth he; "telle me what." And then he told him this and that, And swore thereto, that it was sooth; "Thus hath he said," and "Thus he do'th," And "Thus shall 't be," and "Thus heard I say "That shall be found, that dare I lay;"* *wager That all the folk that is alive Have not the cunning to descrive* *describe The thinges that I hearde there, What aloud, and what in th'ear. But all the wonder most was this; When one had heard a thing, y-wis, He came straight to another wight, And gan him tellen anon right The same tale that to him was told, Or it a furlong way was old, <84> And gan somewhat for to eche* *eke, add To this tiding in his speech, More than it ever spoken was. And not so soon departed n'as* *was He from him, than that he met With the third; and *ere he let Any stound,* he told him als'; *without delaying a momen* Were the tidings true or false, Yet would he tell it natheless, And evermore with more increase Than it was erst.* Thus north and south *at first Went ev'ry tiding from mouth to mouth, And that increasing evermo', As fire is wont to *quick and go* *become alive, and spread* From a spark y-sprung amiss, Till all a city burnt up is. And when that it was full up-sprung, And waxen* more on ev'ry tongue *increased Than e'er it was, it went anon Up to a window out to go'n; Or, but it mighte thereout pass, It gan creep out at some crevass,* *crevice, chink And fly forth faste for the nonce. And sometimes saw I there at once *A leasing, and a sad sooth saw,* *a falsehood and an earnest That gan *of adventure* draw true saying* *by chance Out at a window for to pace; And when they metten in that place, They were checked both the two, And neither of them might out go; For other so they gan *to crowd,* *push, squeeze, each other* Till each of them gan cryen loud, "Let me go first!" -- "Nay, but let me! And here I will ensure thee, With vowes, if thou wilt do so, That I shall never from thee go, But be thine owen sworen brother! We will us medle* each with other, *mingle That no man, be he ne'er so wroth, Shall have one of us two, but both At ones, as *beside his leave,* *despite his desire* Come we at morning or at eve, Be we cried or *still y-rowned."* *quietly whispered* Thus saw I false and sooth, compouned,* *compounded Together fly for one tiding. Then out at holes gan to wring* *squeeze, struggle Every tiding straight to Fame; And she gan give to each his name After her disposition, And gave them eke duration, Some to wax and wane soon, As doth the faire white moon; And let them go. There might I see Winged wonders full fast flee, Twenty thousand in a rout,* *company As Aeolus them blew about. And, Lord! this House in alle times Was full of shipmen and pilgrimes, <85> With *scrippes bretfull of leasings,* *wallets brimful of falsehoods* Entremedled with tidings* *true stories And eke alone by themselve. And many thousand times twelve Saw I eke of these pardoners,<86> Couriers, and eke messengers, With boistes* crammed full of lies *boxes As ever vessel was with lyes.* *lees of wine And as I altherfaste* went *with all speed About, and did all mine intent Me *for to play and for to lear,* *to amuse and instruct myself* And eke a tiding for to hear That I had heard of some country, That shall not now be told for me; -- For it no need is, readily; Folk can sing it better than I. For all must out, or late or rath,* *soon All the sheaves in the lath;* *barn <87> I heard a greate noise withal In a corner of the hall, Where men of love tidings told; And I gan thitherward behold, For I saw running ev'ry wight As fast as that they hadde might, And ev'reach cried, "What thing is that?" And some said, "I know never what." And when they were all on a heap, Those behinde gan up leap, And clomb* upon each other fast, <88> *climbed And up the noise on high they cast, And trodden fast on others' heels, And stamp'd, as men do after eels.
4、  [The Parson proceeds to treat of the other cardinal sins, and their remedies: (2.) Envy, with its remedy, the love of God principally and of our neighbours as ourselves: (3.) Anger, with all its fruits in revenge, rancour, hate, discord, manslaughter, blasphemy, swearing, falsehood, flattery, chiding and reproving, scorning, treachery, sowing of strife, doubleness of tongue, betraying of counsel to a man's disgrace, menacing, idle words, jangling, japery or buffoonery, &c. -- and its remedy in the virtues called mansuetude, debonairte, or gentleness, and patience or sufferance: (4.) Sloth, or "Accidie," which comes after the sin of Anger, because Envy blinds the eyes of a man, and Anger troubleth a man, and Sloth maketh him heavy, thoughtful, and peevish. It is opposed to every estate of man -- as unfallen, and held to work in praising and adoring God; as sinful, and held to labour in praying for deliverance from sin; and as in the state of grace, and held to works of penitence. It resembles the heavy and sluggish condition of those in hell; it will suffer no hardness and no penance; it prevents any beginning of good works; it causes despair of God's mercy, which is the sin against the Holy Ghost; it induces somnolency and neglect of communion in prayer with God; and it breeds negligence or recklessness, that cares for nothing, and is the nurse of all mischiefs, if ignorance is their mother. Against Sloth, and these and other branches and fruits of it, the remedy lies in the virtue of fortitude or strength, in its various species of magnanimity or great courage; faith and hope in God and his saints; surety or sickerness, when a man fears nothing that can oppose the good works he has under taken; magnificence, when he carries out great works of goodness begun; constancy or stableness of heart; and other incentives to energy and laborious service: (5.) Avarice, or Covetousness, which is the root of all harms, since its votaries are idolaters, oppressors and enslavers of men, deceivers of their equals in business, simoniacs, gamblers, liars, thieves, false swearers, blasphemers, murderers, and sacrilegious. Its remedy lies in compassion and pity largely exercised, and in reasonable liberality -- for those who spend on "fool-largesse," or ostentation of worldly estate and luxury, shall receive the malison [condemnation] that Christ shall give at the day of doom to them that shall be damned: (6.) Gluttony; -- of which the Parson treats so briefly that the chapter may be given in full: -- ]
5、  The eighteenth statute, wholly to commend, To please thy lady, is, That thou eschew With sluttishness thyself for to offend; Be jolly, fresh, and feat,* with thinges new, *dainty <24> Courtly with manner, this is all thy due, Gentle of port, and loving cleanliness; This is the thing that liketh thy mistress.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(DFmRve8f49702))

  • 林泽丰 08-09

      R.

  • 舒均倪 08-09

      THE PROLOGUE.

  • 李慧燕 08-09

       "Nor me to love a wonder is it not; For well wot I myself, so God me speed! -- *All would I* that no man wist of this thought -- *although I would* I am one of the fairest, without drede,* *doubt And goodlieste, who so taketh heed; And so men say in all the town of Troy; What wonder is, though he on me have joy?

  • 曾韵 08-09

      28. Jesus, the son of Sirach, to whom is ascribed one of the books of the Apochrypha -- that called the "Wisdom of Jesus the Son of Sirach, or Ecclesiasticus;" in which, especially in the ninth and twenty-fifth chapters, severe cautions are given against women.

  • 欧麦香 08-08

    {  1. Under your yerd: under your rod; as the emblem of government or direction.

  • 苗连生 08-07

      1. The genuineness and real significance of this "Prayer of Chaucer," usually called his "Retractation," have been warmly disputed. On the one hand, it has been declared that the monks forged the retractation. and procured its insertion among the works of the man who had done so much to expose their abuses and ignorance, and to weaken their hold on popular credulity: on the other hand, Chaucer himself at the close of his life, is said to have greatly lamented the ribaldry and the attacks on the clergy which marked especially "The Canterbury Tales," and to have drawn up a formal retractation of which the "Prayer" is either a copy or an abridgment. The beginning and end of the "Prayer," as Tyrwhitt points out, are in tone and terms quite appropriate in the mouth of the Parson, while they carry on the subject of which he has been treating; and, despite the fact that Mr Wright holds the contrary opinion, Tyrwhitt seems to be justified in setting down the "Retractation" as interpolated into the close of the Parson's Tale. Of the circumstances under which the interpolation was made, or the causes by which it was dictated, little or nothing can now be confidently affirmed; but the agreement of the manuscripts and the early editions in giving it, render it impossible to discard it peremptorily as a declaration of prudish or of interested regret, with which Chaucer himself had nothing whatever to do.}

  • 巴尔克哈德·阿卜迪 08-07

      "Galfridus Chaucer, vates, et fama poesis Maternae, hoc sacra sum tumulatus humo." <13>

  • 西索科 08-07

      This Sompnour, which that was as full of jangles,* *chattering As full of venom be those wariangles,* * butcher-birds <7> And ev'r inquiring upon every thing, "Brother," quoth he, "where is now your dwelling, Another day if that I should you seech?"* *seek, visit This yeoman him answered in soft speech; Brother," quoth he, "far in the North country,<8> Where as I hope some time I shall thee see Ere we depart I shall thee so well wiss,* *inform That of mine house shalt thou never miss." Now, brother," quoth this Sompnour, "I you pray, Teach me, while that we ride by the way, (Since that ye be a bailiff as am I,) Some subtilty, and tell me faithfully For mine office how that I most may win. And *spare not* for conscience or for sin, *conceal nothing* But, as my brother, tell me how do ye." Now by my trothe, brother mine," said he, As I shall tell to thee a faithful tale: My wages be full strait and eke full smale; My lord is hard to me and dangerous,* *niggardly And mine office is full laborious; And therefore by extortion I live, Forsooth I take all that men will me give. Algate* by sleighte, or by violence, *whether From year to year I win all my dispence; I can no better tell thee faithfully." Now certes," quoth this Sompnour, "so fare* I; *do I spare not to take, God it wot, *But if* it be too heavy or too hot. *unless* What I may get in counsel privily, No manner conscience of that have I. N'ere* mine extortion, I might not live, *were it not for For of such japes* will I not be shrive.** *tricks **confessed Stomach nor conscience know I none; I shrew* these shrifte-fathers** every one. *curse **confessors Well be we met, by God and by St Jame. But, leve brother, tell me then thy name," Quoth this Sompnour. Right in this meane while This yeoman gan a little for to smile.

  • 林青 08-06

       And thus she said in her benigne voice: Farewell, my child, I shall thee never see; But since I have thee marked with the cross, Of that father y-blessed may'st thou be That for us died upon a cross of tree: Thy soul, my little child, I *him betake,* *commit unto him* For this night shalt thou dien for my sake.

  • 冯新婷 08-04

    {  "And if that I consent, I wrongfully Complain y-wis: thus pushed to and fro, All starreless within a boat am I, Middes the sea, betwixte windes two, That in contrary standen evermo'. Alas! what wonder is this malady! -- For heat of cold, for cold of heat, I die!"

  • 周明华 08-04

      When I out at the doores came, I fast aboute me beheld; Then saw I but a large feld,* *open country As far as that I mighte see, WIthoute town, or house, or tree, Or bush, or grass, or ered* land, *ploughed <9> For all the field was but of sand, As small* as men may see it lie *fine In the desert of Libye; Nor no manner creature That is formed by Nature, There saw I, me to *rede or wiss.* *advise or direct* "O Christ!" thought I, "that art in bliss, From *phantom and illusion* *vain fancy and deception* Me save!" and with devotion Mine eyen to the heav'n I cast. Then was I ware at the last That, faste by the sun on high, *As kennen might I* with mine eye, *as well as I might discern* Me thought I saw an eagle soar, But that it seemed muche more* *larger Than I had any eagle seen; This is as sooth as death, certain, It was of gold, and shone so bright, That never saw men such a sight, But if* the heaven had y-won, *unless All new from God, another sun; So shone the eagle's feathers bright: And somewhat downward gan it light.* *descend, alight

提交评论