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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:哈茨菲尔德-杰克逊 大小:Cs9xJMPN63128KB 下载:kJwNxbU786099次
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日期:2020-08-09 04:38:46
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Laertes was delighted when he heard this. "Good heavens, heexclaimed, "what a day I am enjoying: I do indeed rejoice at it. Myson and grandson are vying with one another in the matter of valour."
2.  She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then going upstairs with her handmaids into her room, shemourned her dear husband till Minerva sent sweet sleep over hereyelids.
3.  "Wife," said he, turning to Queen Arete, "Go, fetch the best chestwe have, and put a clean cloak and shirt in it. Also, set a copperon the fire and heat some water; our guest will take a warm bath;see also to the careful packing of the presents that the noblePhaeacians have made him; he will thus better enjoy both his supperand the singing that will follow. I shall myself give him thisgolden goblet- which is of exquisite workmanship- that he may bereminded of me for the rest of his life whenever he makes adrink-offering to Jove, or to any of the gods."
4.  When they had done praying and sprinkling the barley mealThrasymedes dealt his blow, and brought the heifer down with astroke that cut through the tendons at the base of her neck, whereonthe daughters and daughters-in-law of Nestor, and his venerable wifeEurydice (she was eldest daughter to Clymenus) screamed withdelight. Then they lifted the heifer's head from off the ground, andPisistratus cut her throat. When she had done bleeding and was quitedead, they cut her up. They cut out the thigh bones all in due course,wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set some pieces of rawmeat on the top of them; then Nestor laid them upon the wood fireand poured wine over them, while the young men stood near him withfive-pronged spits in their hands. When the thighs were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest of the meat upsmall, put the pieces on the spits and toasted them over the fire.
5.  He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:
6.  "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.

计划指导

1.  BOOK XIII.
2.  Here they found the ghost of Achilles son of Peleus, with those ofPatroclus, Antilochus, and Ajax, who was the finest and handsomest manof all the Danaans after the son of Peleus himself.
3.  Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."
4.  "And what, Telemachus, has led you to take this long sea voyage toLacedaemon? Are you on public or private business? Tell me all aboutit."
5.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs,or aiming with spears at a mark on the levelled ground in front of thehouse, and behaving with all their old insolence. But when it wasnow time for dinner, and the flock of sheep and goats had come intothe town from all the country round, with their shepherds as usual,then Medon, who was their favourite servant, and who waited uponthem at table, said, "Now then, my young masters, you have hadenough sport, so come inside that we may get dinner ready. Dinner isnot a bad thing, at dinner time."
6.  "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'

推荐功能

1.  "You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vainhopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could ofhimself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself oldand young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him. A secondago you were old and all in rags, and now you are like some god comedown from heaven."
2.  "Next to her I saw Antiope, daughter to Asopus, who could boast ofhaving slept in the arms of even Jove himself, and who bore him twosons Amphion and Zethus. These founded Thebes with its seven gates,and built a wall all round it; for strong though they were theycould not hold Thebes till they had walled it.
3.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, how can I drive the mother whobore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not knowwhether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to payIcarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending hisdaughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, butheaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the housewill calf on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be acreditable thing to do, and I will have nothing to say to it. If youchoose to take offence at this, leave the house and feast elsewhere atone another's houses at your own cost turn and turn about. If, onthe other hand, you elect to persist in spunging upon one man,heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon with you in full, and when youfall in my father's house there shall be no man to avenge you."
4.  "My poor good man," said she, "why is Neptune so furiously angrywith you? He is giving you a great deal of trouble, but for all hisbluster he will not kill you. You seem to be a sensible person, dothen as I bid you; strip, leave your raft to drive before the wind,and swim to the Phaecian coast where better luck awaits you. And here,take my veil and put it round your chest; it is enchanted, and you cancome to no harm so long as you wear it. As soon as you touch land takeit off, throw it back as far as you can into the sea, and then go awayagain." With these words she took off her veil and gave it him. Thenshe dived down again like a sea-gull and vanished beneath the darkblue waters.
5.   NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus rose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to hiscomely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. He at once sent the criers round to callthe people in assembly, so they called them and the people gatheredthereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place ofassembly spear in hand- not alone, for his two hounds went with him.Minerva endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness that allmarvelled at him as he went by, and when he took his place' in hisfather's seat even the oldest councillors made way for him.
6.  Presently the sun set and darkness was over all the land. The vesselmade a quick pass sage to Pheae and thence on to Elis, where theEpeans rule. Telemachus then headed her for the flying islands,wondering within himself whether he should escape death or should betaken prisoner.

应用

1.  Thus did they converse, but King Apollo said to Mercury,"Messenger Mercury, giver of good things, you would not care howstrong the chains were, would you, if you could sleep with Venus?"
2.  "Cease your weeping, lest some one should come outside and see us,and tell those who a are within. When you go in, do so separately, notboth together; I will go first, and do you follow afterwards; Let thismoreover be the token between us; the suitors will all of them tryto prevent me from getting hold of the bow and quiver; do you,therefore, Eumaeus, place it in my hands when you are carrying itabout, and tell the women to close the doors of their apartment. Ifthey hear any groaning or uproar as of men fighting about the house,they must not come out; they must keep quiet, and stay where theyare at their work. And I charge you, Philoetius, to make fast thedoors of the outer court, and to bind them securely at once."
3.  As he spoke he went up to Ulysses and saluted him with his righthand; "Good day to you, father stranger," said he, "you seem to bevery poorly off now, but I hope you will have better times by andby. Father Jove, of all gods you are the most malicious. We are yourown children, yet you show us no mercy in all our misery andafflictions. A sweat came over me when I saw this man, and my eyesfilled with tears, for he reminds me of Ulysses, who I fear is goingabout in just such rags as this man's are, if indeed he is still amongthe living. If he is already dead and in the house of Hades, then,alas! for my good master, who made me his stockman when I was quiteyoung among the Cephallenians, and now his cattle are countless; noone could have done better with them than I have, for they have bredlike ears of corn; nevertheless I have to keep bringing them in forothers to eat, who take no heed of his son though he is in thehouse, and fear not the wrath of heaven, but are already eager todivide Ulysses' property among them because he has been away solong. I have often thought- only it would not be right while his sonis living- of going off with the cattle to some foreign country; badas this would be, it is still harder to stay here and be ill-treatedabout other people's herds. My position is intolerable, and I shouldlong since have run away and put myself under the protection of someother chief, only that I believe my poor master will yet return, andsend all these suitors flying out of the house."
4、  "Vixen," replied Ulysses, scowling at her, "I will go and tellTelemachus what you have been saying, and he will have you torn limbfrom limb."
5、  Then Minerva put it into the mind of Penelope to show herself to thesuitors, that she might make them still more enamoured of her, and winstill further honour from her son and husband. So she feigned amocking laugh and said, "Eurynome, I have changed my and have afancy to show myself to the suitors although I detest them. I shouldlike also to give my son a hint that he had better not have anythingmore to do with them. They speak fairly enough but they meanmischief."

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  • 王岗 08-08

      The swineherd now took up the bow and was for taking it toUlysses, but the suitors clamoured at him from all parts of thecloisters, and one of them said, "You idiot, where are you takingthe bow to? Are you out of your wits? If Apollo and the other godswill grant our prayer, your own boarhounds shall get you into somequiet little place, and worry you to death."

  • 李德侬 08-08

      "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'

  • 张秀吉 08-08

       "'Stranger,' replied she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you.There is an old immortal who lives under the sea hereabouts andwhose name is Proteus. He is an Egyptian, and people say he is myfather; he is Neptune's head man and knows every inch of ground allover the bottom of the sea. If you can snare him and hold him tight,he will tell you about your voyage, what courses you are to take,and how you are to sail the sea so as to reach your home. He will alsotell you, if you so will, all that has been going on at your houseboth good and bad, while you have been away on your long and dangerousjourney.'

  • 埃里克·施密茨 08-08

      As spoke he took Telemachus' spear, whereon he crossed the stonethreshold and came inside. Ulysses rose from his seat to give himplace as he entered, but Telemachus checked him; "Sit down, stranger."said he, "I can easily find another seat, and there is one here whowill lay it for me."

  • 李柏涛 08-07

    {  "So she swore at once as I had told her, and when she hadcompleted her oath then I went to bed with her.

  • 孙良 08-06

      As she spoke she infused fresh vigour into him, and when he hadprayed to her he poised his spear and hurled it. He hit Eupeithes'helmet, and the spear went right through it, for the helmet stayedit not, and his armour rang rattling round him as he fell heavily tothe ground. Meantime Ulysses and his son fell the front line of thefoe and smote them with their swords and spears; indeed, they wouldhave killed every one of them, and prevented them from ever gettinghome again, only Minerva raised her voice aloud, and made every onepause. "Men of Ithaca," she cried, cease this dreadful war, and settlethe matter at once without further bloodshed."}

  • 邓姑 08-06

      Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, itserved Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as hedid; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses thatmy heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonelysea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends. It is anisland covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and agoddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks afterthe bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keepheaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold ofpoor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishmentto make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinksof nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troydid he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice? Why then shouldyou keep on being so angry with him?"

  • 马尔凯 08-06

      He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:

  • 康晓萍 08-05

       "Telemachus," said one youngster, "means to be the death of us; Isuppose he thinks he can bring friends to help him from Pylos, oragain from Sparta, where he seems bent on going. Or will he go toEphyra as well, for poison to put in our wine and kill us?"

  • 葛丹 08-03

    {  "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'

  • 迈克·马克斯 08-03

      "Hear me," she cried, "Daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove,unweariable. If ever Ulysses while he was here burned you fat thighbones of sheep or heifer, bear it in mind now as in my favour, andsave my darling son from the villainy of the suitors."

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