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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:乔治·普雷蒂 大小:8f2iYf4I81259KB 下载:w64ggztR51713次
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日期:2020-08-08 00:35:29
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, we admiredthe island and wandered all over it, while the nymphs Jove's daughtersroused the wild goats that we might get some meat for our dinner. Onthis we fetched our spears and bows and arrows from the ships, anddividing ourselves into three bands began to shoot the goats. Heavensent us excellent sport; I had twelve ships with me, and each ship gotnine goats, while my own ship had ten; thus through the livelong dayto the going down of the sun we ate and drank our fill,- and we hadplenty of wine left, for each one of us had taken many jars fullwhen we sacked the city of the Cicons, and this had not yet run out.While we were feasting we kept turning our eyes towards the land ofthe Cyclopes, which was hard by, and saw the smoke of their stubblefires. We could almost fancy we heard their voices and the bleating oftheir sheep and goats, but when the sun went down and it came on dark,we camped down upon the beach, and next morning I called a council.
2.  "So you are come, Telemachus, light of my eyes that you are. WhenI heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see youany more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a goodlook at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come intothe country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the towngenerally. I suppose you think it better to keep an eye on what thesuitors are doing."
3.  And Minerva said, "There is no fear of your race dying out yet,while Penelope has such a fine son as you are. But tell me, and tellme true, what is the meaning of all this feasting, and who are thesepeople? What is it all about? Have you some banquet, or is there awedding in the family- for no one seems to be bringing anyprovisions of his own? And the guests- how atrociously they arebehaving; what riot they make over the whole house; it is enough todisgust any respectable person who comes near them."
4.  "Do not scold me, mother,' answered Telemachus, "nor vex me,seeing what a narrow escape I have had, but wash your face, changeyour dress, go upstairs with your maids, and promise full andsufficient hecatombs to all the gods if Jove will only grant us ourrevenge upon the suitors. I must now go to the place of assembly toinvite a stranger who has come back with me from Pylos. I sent himon with my crew, and told Piraeus to take him home and look afterhim till I could come for him myself."
5.  On this he took his leave, and Calypso went out to look for Ulysses,for she had heard Jove's message. She found him sitting upon the beachwith his eyes ever filled with tears, and dying of sheerhome-sickness; for he had got tired of Calypso, and though he wasforced to sleep with her in the cave by night, it was she, not he,that would have it so. As for the day time, he spent it on the rocksand on the sea-shore, weeping, crying aloud for his despair, andalways looking out upon the sea. Calypso then went close up to himsaid:
6.  BOOK XIX.

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1.  "You are always taking something of that sort into your head,"replied Minerva, "and that is why I cannot desert you in yourafflictions; you are so plausible, shrewd and shifty. Any one butyourself on returning from so long a voyage would at once have gonehome to see his wife and children, but you do not seem to care aboutasking after them or hearing any news about them till you haveexploited your wife, who remains at home vainly grieving for you,and having no peace night or day for the tears she sheds on yourbehalf. As for my not coming near you, I was never uneasy about you,for I was certain you would get back safely though you would loseall your men, and I did not wish to quarrel with my uncle Neptune, whonever forgave you for having blinded his son. I will now, however,point out to you the lie of the land, and you will then perhapsbelieve me. This is the haven of the old merman Phorcys, and here isthe olive tree that grows at the head of it; [near it is the cavesacred to the Naiads;] here too is the overarching cavern in which youhave offered many an acceptable hecatomb to the nymphs, and this isthe wooded mountain Neritum."
2.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Eurynome and the nurse tooktorches and made the bed ready with soft coverlets; as soon as theyhad laid them, the nurse went back into the house to go to her rest,leaving the bed chamber woman Eurynome to show Ulysses and Penelope tobed by torch light. When she had conducted them to their room she wentback, and they then came joyfully to the rites of their own old bed.Telemachus, Philoetius, and the swineherd now left off dancing, andmade the women leave off also. They then laid themselves down to sleepin the cloisters.
3.  Then they stood on one side and went to tell the girl, while Ulysseswashed himself in the stream and scrubbed the brine from his backand from his broad shoulders. When he had thoroughly washed himself,and had got the brine out of his hair, he anointed himself with oil,and put on the clothes which the girl had given him; Minerva then madehim look taller and stronger than before, she also made the hairgrow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders as askilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcan andMinerva enriches a piece of silver plate by gilding it- and his workis full of beauty. Then he went and sat down a little way off upon thebeach, looking quite young and handsome, and the girl gazed on himwith admiration; then she said to her maids:
4.  The suitors bit their lips and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; but Amphinomus the son of Nisus, who was son to Aretias, said,"Do not let us take offence; it is reasonable, so let us make noanswer. Neither let us do violence to the stranger nor to any ofUlysses' servants. Let the cupbearer go round with thedrink-offerings, that we may make them and go home to our rest. As forthe stranger, let us leave Telemachus to deal with him, for it is tohis house that he has come."
5.  "Then, being much troubled in mind, I said to my men, 'My friends,it is not right that one or two of us alone should know the propheciesthat Circe has made me, I will therefore tell you about them, sothat whether we live or die we may do so with our eyes open. First shesaid we were to keep clear of the Sirens, who sit and sing mostbeautifully in a field of flowers; but she said I might hear themmyself so long as no one else did. Therefore, take me and bind me tothe crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright,with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash therope's ends to the mast itself. If I beg and pray you to set mefree, then bind me more tightly still.'
6.  "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."

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1.  "After her I saw Iphimedeia wife of Aloeus who boasted the embraceof Neptune. She bore two sons Otus and Ephialtes, but both wereshort lived. They were the finest children that were ever born in thisworld, and the best looking, Orion only excepted; for at nine yearsold they were nine fathoms high, and measured nine cubits round thechest. They threatened to make war with the gods in Olympus, and triedto set Mount Ossa on the top of Mount Olympus, and Mount Pelion on thetop of Ossa, that they might scale heaven itself, and they wouldhave done it too if they had been grown up, but Apollo, son of Leto,killed both of them, before they had got so much as a sign of hairupon their cheeks or chin.
2.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.
3.  "'When you shall have thus besought the ghosts with your prayers,offer them a ram and a black ewe, bending their heads towardsErebus; but yourself turn away from them as though you would maketowards the river. On this, many dead men's ghosts will come to you,and you must tell your men to skin the two sheep that you have justkilled, and offer them as a burnt sacrifice with prayers to Hadesand to Proserpine. Then draw your sword and sit there, so as toprevent any other poor ghost from coming near the split blood beforeTeiresias shall have answered your questions. The seer willpresently come to you, and will tell you about your voyage- whatstages you are to make, and how you are to sail the see so as to reachyour home.'
4.  "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.
5.   Meanwhile Agelaus son of Damastor, Eurynomus, Amphimedon,Demoptolemus, Pisander, and Polybus son of Polyctor bore the bruntof the fight upon the suitors' side; of all those who were stillfighting for their lives they were by far the most valiant, for theothers had already fallen under the arrows of Ulysses. Agelaus shoutedto them and said, "My friends, he will soon have to leave off, forMentor has gone away after having done nothing for him but brag.They are standing at the doors unsupported. Do not aim at him all atonce, but six of you throw your spears first, and see if you cannotcover yourselves with glory by killing him. When he has fallen we neednot be uneasy about the others."
6.  THEN, when we had got down to the sea shore we drew our ship intothe water and got her mast and sails into her; we also put the sheepon board and took our places, weeping and in great distress of mind.Circe, that great and cunning goddess, sent us a fair wind that blewdead aft and stayed steadily with us keeping our sails all the timewell filled; so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear andlet her go as the wind and helmsman headed her. All day long her sailswere full as she held her course over the sea, but when the sun wentdown and darkness was over all the earth, we got into the deepwaters of the river Oceanus, where lie the land and city of theCimmerians who live enshrouded in mist and darkness which the raysof the sun never pierce neither at his rising nor as he goes downagain out of the heavens, but the poor wretches live in one longmelancholy night. When we got there we beached the ship, took thesheep out of her, and went along by the waters of Oceanus till we cameto the place of which Circe had told us.

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1.  As he spoke day began to break, and Menelaus, who had already risen,leaving Helen in bed, came towards them. When Telemachus saw him heput on his shirt as fast as he could, threw a great cloak over hisshoulders, and went out to meet him. "Menelaus," said he, "let me goback now to my own country, for I want to get home."
2.  "Listen to me you suitors, who persist in abusing the hospitality ofthis house because its owner has been long absent, and without otherpretext than that you want to marry me; this, then, being the prizethat you are contending for, I will bring out the mighty bow ofUlysses, and whomsoever of you shall string it most easily and sendhis arrow through each one of twelve axes, him will I follow andquit this house of my lawful husband, so goodly, and so abounding inwealth. But even so I doubt not that I shall remember it in mydreams."
3.  Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."
4、  Laertes was delighted when he heard this. "Good heavens, heexclaimed, "what a day I am enjoying: I do indeed rejoice at it. Myson and grandson are vying with one another in the matter of valour."
5、  Pontonous then mixed wine and water, and handed it round aftergiving every man his drink-offering. When they had made theirofferings, and had drunk each as much as he was minded, Alcinous said:

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  • 王增明 08-07

      "You are quite right, Laodamas," replied Euryalus, "go up to yourguest and speak to him about it yourself."

  • 王保丰 08-07

      "When Circe saw me sitting there without eating, and in great grief,she came to me and said, 'Ulysses, why do you sit like that asthough you were dumb, gnawing at your own heart, and refusing bothmeat and drink? Is it that you are still suspicious? You ought notto be, for I have already sworn solemnly that I will not hurt you.'

  • 马蒂诺 08-07

       "I went on board, bidding my men to do so also and loose thehawsers; so they took their places and smote the grey sea with theiroars. When we got to the land, which was not far, there, on the faceof a cliff near the sea, we saw a great cave overhung with laurels. Itwas a station for a great many sheep and goats, and outside therewas a large yard, with a high wall round it made of stones builtinto the ground and of trees both pine and oak. This was the abodeof a huge monster who was then away from home shepherding hisflocks. He would have nothing to do with other people, but led thelife of an outlaw. He was a horrid creature, not like a human being atall, but resembling rather some crag that stands out boldly againstthe sky on the top of a high mountain.

  • 孙骄雄 08-07

      Then the suitors came in and took their places on the benches andseats. Forthwith men servants poured water over their hands, maidswent round with the bread-baskets, pages filled the mixing-bowlswith wine and water, and they laid their hands upon the good thingsthat were before them. As soon as they had had enough to eat and drinkthey wanted music and dancing, which are the crowning embellishmentsof a banquet, so a servant brought a lyre to Phemius, whom theycompelled perforce to sing to them. As soon as he touched his lyre andbegan to sing Telemachus spoke low to Minerva, with his head closeto hers that no man might hear.

  • 赤涛 08-06

    {  "If, therefore, you want my father to give you an escort and to helpyou home, do as I bid you; you will see a beautiful grove of poplarsby the road side dedicated to Minerva; it has a well in it and ameadow all round it. Here my father has a field of rich garden ground,about as far from the town as a man' voice will carry. Sit downthere and wait for a while till the rest of us can get into the townand reach my father's house. Then, when you think we must have donethis, come into the town and ask the way to the house of my fatherAlcinous. You will have no difficulty in finding it; any child willpoint it out to you, for no one else in the whole town has anythinglike such a fine house as he has. When you have got past the gates andthrough the outer court, go right across the inner court till you cometo my mother. You will find her sitting by the fire and spinning herpurple wool by firelight. It is a fine sight to see her as she leansback against one of the bearing-posts with her maids all ranged behindher. Close to her seat stands that of my father, on which he sitsand topes like an immortal god. Never mind him, but go up to mymother, and lay your hands upon her knees if you would get homequickly. If you can gain her over, you may hope to see your owncountry again, no matter how distant it may be."

  • 欧罗巴 08-05

      As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."}

  • 徐愈 08-05

      On these words the old woman covered her face with her hands; shebegan to weep and made lamentation saying, "My dear child, I cannotthink whatever I am to do with you. I am certain no one was evermore god-fearing than yourself, and yet Jove hates you. No one inthe whole world ever burned him more thigh bones, nor gave him finerhecatombs when you prayed you might come to a green old age yourselfand see your son grow up to take after you; yet see how he hasprevented you alone from ever getting back to your own home. I have nodoubt the women in some foreign palace which Ulysses has got to aregibing at him as all these sluts here have been gibing you. I do notwonder at your not choosing to let them wash you after the manner inwhich they have insulted you; I will wash your feet myself gladlyenough, as Penelope has said that I am to do so; I will wash them bothfor Penelope's sake and for your own, for you have raised the mostlively feelings of compassion in my mind; and let me say thismoreover, which pray attend to; we have had all kinds of strangersin distress come here before now, but I make bold to say that no oneever yet came who was so like Ulysses in figure, voice, and feet asyou are."

  • 王炳坤 08-05

      Thus did they converse. Then Arete told her maids to set a bed inthe room that was in the gatehouse, and make it with good red rugs,and to spread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks forUlysses to wear. The maids thereon went out with torches in theirhands, and when they had made the bed they came up to Ulysses andsaid, "Rise, sir stranger, and come with us for your bed is ready,"and glad indeed was he to go to his rest.

  • 吴某益 08-04

       Thus did he speak, and they all of them laughed heartily, whichput them in a better humour with Telemachus; so Eumaeus brought thebow on and placed it in the hands of Ulysses. When he had done this,he called Euryclea apart and said to her, "Euryclea, Telemachus saysyou are to close the doors of the women's apartments. If they hear anygroaning or uproar as of men fighting about the house, they are not tocome out, but are to keep quiet and stay where they are at theirwork."

  • 德哈 08-02

    {  She went straight to the beautifully decorated bedroom in whichthere slept a girl who was as lovely as a goddess, Nausicaa,daughter to King Alcinous. Two maid servants were sleeping near her,both very pretty, one on either side of the doorway, which wasclosed with well-made folding doors. Minerva took the form of thefamous sea captain Dymas's daughter, who was a bosom friend ofNausicaa and just her own age; then, coming up to the girl's bedsidelike a breath of wind, she hovered over her head and said:

  • 陆官拜 08-02

      "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as myfather was here it was well with us and with the house, but the godsin their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden himaway more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden. I could haveborne it better even though he were dead, if he had fallen with hismen before Troy, or had died with friends around him when the daysof his fighting were done; for then the Achaeans would have built amound over his ashes, and I should myself have been heir to hisrenown; but now the storm-winds have spirited him away we know notwither; he is gone without leaving so much as a trace behind him,and I inherit nothing but dismay. Nor does the matter end simplywith grief for the loss of my father; heaven has laid sorrows uponme of yet another kind; for the chiefs from all our islands,Dulichium, Same, and the woodland island of Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying their court to my mother, who will neither pointblank say that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end; sothey are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so alsowith myself."

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