0 下载快3走势图-APP安装下载

下载快3走势图 注册最新版下载

下载快3走势图 注册

下载快3走势图注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:梁朝伟 大小:S2iyzVUr76168KB 下载:a0RKq0GD81472次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:X2F6HXKN91556条
日期:2020-08-08 21:10:54
安卓
文林苑

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  With Chaplets of Flowers,
2.  Because the Novell reported by Madame Neiphila was so sooneconcluded, without much laughter, or commendation of the wholeCompany: the Queene turned hir selfe towards Madam Fiammetta,enjoyning her to succeed in apt order; and she being as ready assodainly commanded, began as followeth. Most gentle Ladies, I amperswaded of your opinion in judgement with mine, that there is notany thing, which can bee spoken pleasingly, except it beconveniently suited with apt time and place: in which respect, whenLadies and Gentlewomen are bent to discoursing, the due election ofthem both are necessarily required. And therefore I am not unmindfull,that our meeting heere (ayming at nothing more, then to outweare thetime with our generall contentment) should tye us to the course of ourpleasure and recreation, to the same conveniency of time and place;not sparing, though some have bin nominated oftentimes in our passedarguments; yet, if occasion serve, and the nature of variety be wellconsidered, wee may speake of the selfesame persons againe.
3.  At last he came to the lodging of the man indeede, that had soimpudently usurped his place, who could not as yet sleepe, for joyof atchieved adventure. When he espied the King come in, knowingwell the occasion of his search, he began to waxe very doubtfull, sothat his heart and pulse beating extreamely, he felt a furtheraddition of feare, as being confidently perswaded, that there wasnow no other way but death, especially if the King discovered hisagony. And although many considerations were in his braine, yetbecause he saw that the King was unarmed, his best refuge was, to makeshew of sleepe, in expectation what the King intended to doe. Amongthem all he had sought, yet could not find any likelihood, wherebyto gather a grounded probability; he came to this Querry, whoseheart and pulses laboured so strongly, that he said to himselfe, Yeamary, this is th man that did the deede.
4.  Not long after, Count Bertrand was recalled home by his people:and he having heard of his wives absence, went to Roussillion somuch the more willingly. And the Countesse knowing her husbandsdeparture from Florence, as also his safe arrivall at his ownedwelling, remained still in Florence, untill the time of herdeliverance, which was of two goodly Sonnes, lively resembling thelookes of their Father, and all the perfect lineaments of his body.Perswade your selves, she was not a little carefull of theirnursing; and when she saw the time answerable to her determination,she tooke her journey (unknowne to any) and arrived with them atMontpellier, where she rested her selfe for divers dayes, after solong and wearisome a journey.
5.  OR WIVES THAT ARE HIS SUBJECTS: YET HE OUGHT TO DENY AND REJECT
6.  I know no Lady living,

计划指导

1.  Carapresa having heard her request, like a good woman as she was,left Constance in her poore Cottage, and went hastily to leave hernets in safety: which being done, she returned backe againe, andcovering Constance with her Mantle, led her on to Susa with her, wherebeing arrived, the good woman began in this manner. Constance, Iwill bring thee to the house of a very worthy Sarazin Lady, to whomI have done many honest services, according as she pleased tocommand me. She is an ancient woman, full of charity, and to her Iwill commend thee as best I may, for I am well assured, that shewill gladly entertaine thee, and use thee as if thou wert her owndaughter. Now, let it be thy part, during thy time of remaining withher, to employ thy utmost diligence in pleasing her, by deservingand gaining her grace, till heaven shall blesse thee with betterfortune: and as she promised, so she performed.
2.  Our King (most Noble and vertuous Ladies) hath this day given us asubject, very rough and stearne to discourse on, and so much therather, if we consider, that we are come hither to be merry andpleasant, where sad Tragicall reports are no way suteable, especially,by reviving the teares of others, to bedew our owne cheekes withall.Nor can any such argument be spoken of, without moving compassion bothin the reporters, and hearers. But (perhaps) it was his Highnessepleasure, to moderate the delights which we have already had. Orwhatsoever else hath provoked him thereto, seeing it is not lawfullfor me, to alter or contradict his appointment; I will recount anaccident very pittifull, or rather most unfortinate, and well worthyto be graced with bur teares.
3.  In the same streete, and not farre from the joyner, dwelt two yongmen who were Lombards, living upon the interest of their moneyes,coveting to get much, and to spend little. They having observedwhere the Chest stood, and wanting a necessary mooveable tohoushold, yet loath to lay out money for buying it: complottedtogether this very night, to steale it thence, and carry it home totheir house, as accordingly they did; finding it somewhat heavy, andtherefore imagining, that matter of woorth was contained therein. Inthe Chamber where their wives lay, they left it; and so without anyfurther search till the next morning, they laid them downe to restlikewise.
4.  So, proceeding on in his discourse, he recounted every accident asit hapned, both what they had saide and did unto him, concerning theseverall blowes, with the two Flint-stones, the one hurting himgreevously in the heele, and the other paining him as extreamly in thebacke, with their speeches used then, and his laughter,notwithstanding hee felt the harme of them both, yet beeing proud thathe did so invisibly beguile them. Nay more (quoth he) I cannotforbeare to tell you, that when I passed thorow the Port, I saw youstanding with the Warders; yet, by vertue of that excellent Stone,undiscovered of you all. Beside, going along the streets, I met manyof my Gossips, friends, and familiar acquaintance, such as used daylieto converse with me, and drinking together in every Tavern: yet notone of them spake to me, neyther used any courtesie or salutation;which (indeede) I did the more freely forgive them, because theywere not able to see me.
5.  Beleeve me Master Doctor, I would not impart to many people, whatprivate helpes we have for our maintenance: but yet I dare boldlyacquaint you therewith, in regard you are one of our most intimatefriends, and of such secrecie, as (I know) you will not reveale itto any. True it is, that mine honest neighbor and my selfe, do leadeour lives in such merry manner as you see, and better then all theworld is aware of, for I cannot imagine you to bee so ignorant, butare certainly perswaded: that if we had no better means, then ourpoore manuall trade and profession; we might sit at home with breadand water, and be nothing so lively spirited as wee are. Yet Sir, Iwould not have you to conceive, that wee do eyther rob or steale, oruse any other unlawfull courses: onely we travayle to Corsica, fromwhence we bring (without the least prejudice to anie other) all thingswe stand in need of, or whatsoever wee can desire. Thus do wemaintaine our selves well and honestly, and live in this mirthfulldisposition.
6.  ALL MEN

推荐功能

1.  This Song gave occasion to the whole Company, to imagine, thatsome new and pleasing apprehension of Love, constrained MadamePhilomena to sing in this manner. And because (by the discoursethereof) it plainely appeared, that shee had felt more then sheesaw, shee was so much the more happy, and the like was wished by allthe rest. Wherefore, after the Song was ended; the Queeneremembring, that the next day following was Friday, turning herselfe graciously to them all, thus she spake.
2.  Thus Aniolliero, purposing to visite his Cousin the Cardinal likea Gallant, and at the Marquisate of Ancona, returned backe poorly inhis shirt unto Buonconvento, and durst not (for shame) repaire toSienna. In the end, he borrowed money on the other horse whichFortarigo rode on, and remained there in the Inne, whence riding toCorsignano, where he had divers Kinsmen and Friends, he continuedthere so long with them, till he was better furnished from his Father.
3.  Faire Ladies, at such time as the good King William reigned inSicily, there lived within the same Dominion, a young Gentleman, namedSignior Amarigo, Abbot of Trapani, who among his other worldlyblessings, (commonly termed the goods of Fortune) was notunfurnished of children; and therefore having neede of servants, hemade his provision of them the best he might. At that time, certaineGallies of Geneway Pyrates comming from the Easterne parts, whichcoasting along Armenia, had taken divers children; he bought some ofthem, thinking that they were Turkes. They all resembling clownishPeazants, yet there was one among them, who seemed to be of moretractable and gentle nature, yea, and of a more affable countenancethan any of the rest, being named Theodoro: who growing on inyeeres, (albeit he lived in the condition of a servant) was educatedamong Amarigoes Children, and as enstructed rather by nature, thenaccident, his conditions were very much commended, as also the featureof his body, which proved so highly pleasing to his Master Amarigo,that he made him a free man, and imagining him to be a Turke, causedhim to be baptized, and named Pedro, creating him superintendent ofall his affaires, and reposing his-chiefest trust in him.
4.  Then I wandred from assuring.
5.   Gisippus remaining still at Athens, in small regard of eyther theirsor his owne friends: not long after by meanes of sundry troublesomeCitizens; and partialities happening among the common people, wasbanished from Athens, and hee, as also all his familie, condemned toperpetuall exile: during which tempestuous time, Gisippus was becomenot onely wretchedly poore, but wandred abroad as a common begger;in which miserable condition he travelled to Rome, to try if Tituswould take any acknowledgement of him. Understanding that he wasliving, and one most respected among the Romanes, as being a greatCommander and a Senator: he enquired for the place where hee dwelt,and going to be neere about his house, stayed there so long, tillTitus came home, yet not daring to manifest himselfe, or speake a wordto him, in regard of his poore and miserable estate, but strove tohave him see him, to the end, that hee might acknowledge and callhim by his name; notwithstanding, Titus passed by him without eitherspeech, or looking on him: Which when Gisippus perceived, and makingfull account, that (at the least) he would remember him, in regardof former courtesies, done to him: confounded with griefe anddesperate thoughtes, hee departed thence, never meaning to see him anymore.
6.  Thorello (whom the Soldane called by no other name, then theChristian, neyther of them knowing the other) sadly now remembredhis departure from Pavia, devising and practising many times, how hemight escape thence, but could not compasse it by any possible meanes.Wherefore, certaine Ambassadours beeing sent by the Genewayes, toredeeme divers Cittizens of theirs, there detained as prisoners, andbeing ready to returne home againe: he purposed to write to hisWife, that he was living, and wold repaire to her so soone as hecould, desiring the still continued rememberance of her limitedtime. By close and cunning meanes hee wrote the Letter, earnestlyintreating one of the Ambassadors (who knew him perfectly, but made nooutward apparance thereof) to deale in such sort for him, that theLetter might be delivered to the handes of the Abbot Di San Pietroin Ciel d'Oro, who was (indeede) his Unckle.

应用

1.  Cousine, thine unkinde usage by thine husband, is not unknown to me,how he did beate thee (beyond the compasse of all reason) when hebrought home stones from the plain of Mugnone; in which regard, I amvery desirous to have thee revenged on him: which if thou wilt not do,never repute me heereafter for thy Kinsman and Friend. He is falnein love with a Woman of the common gender, one that is to be hired formoney: he hath his private meetings with her, and the place ispartly knowne to me, as by a secret appointment (made very lately) Iam credibly given to understand; wherefore walke presently alongwith me, and thou shalt take him in the heat of his knavery.
2.  Now, after the passage of all these adventures, hardly to beeundertaken by any other Woman: yet she held them insufficient forhis security, in the grounded perswasion of her love to him, exceptshee performed another of her owne, and according as shee had boldlypromised. Houres do now seeme dayes, and dayes multiplicitie ofyeeres, till the kisse may be given, and receyved in the presence ofNicostratus, yet hee himselfe to avouch the contrary.
3.  In the Citie of Naples, it being of great antiquity, and (perhaps)as pleasantly situated, as any other City in all Italy, there dweltsometime a yong Gentleman, of noble parentage, and well knowne tobee wealthy, named Ricciardo Minutolo, who although hee had aGentlewoman of excellent beuty, and worthy the verie kindest affectingto his wife; yet his gadding eye gazed elsewhere, and he becameenamored of another, which (in generall opinion) surpassed all theNeapolitane Women else, in feature, favour, and the choysestperfections, shee being named Madam Catulla wife to as gallant a youngGentleman, called Philippello Fighinolfi, who most dearly he lovedbeyond all other, for her vertue and admired chastity.
4、  WOMAN, SURPASSETH ALL THE ART OR WIT IN MAN
5、  Bernardo, a Merchant of Geneway, being deceived by another Merchant,named Ambroginolo, lost a great part of his goods. And commandinghis innocent Wife to be murthered, she escaped, and (in the habiteof a man) became servant to the Soldane. The deceiver being found atlast, shee compassed such meanes, that her Husband Bernardo cameinto Alexandria, and there, after due punnishment inflicted on thefalse deceiver, she resumed the garments againe of a woman, andreturned home with her Husband to Geneway.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(9LSZk2JS90484))

  • 夏梅尔 08-07

      RESPECTIVELY ON THEIR OWNE IMPERFECTIONS

  • 左丘 08-07

      THE SECOND DAY, THE FIFT NOVELL

  • 叶伟超 08-07

       And when I have given thee the due oblation of my teares, mysoule, which sometime thou hast kept most carfully, shall come to makea sweet conjunction with thine: for in what company else can Itravaile more contentedly, and to those unfrequented silent shades,but onely in thine? As yet am sure it is present here, in this Cupsent me by my Father, as having a provident respect to the place,for possess' of our equall and mutuall pleasures; because thy souleaffecting mine so truly, cannot walke alone, without his dearecompanion.

  • 席志江 08-07

      All unsuspecting, the girl answered. him: "My father, since I havethis Hell, let the thing be done when thou desirest it."

  • 高孔廉 08-06

    {  When the King had survayed all, and the house likewise, he commendedit beyond all other comparison, and the Tables being placed by thePonds side, he washed his hands therin, and then sat down at the theCount, Sir Guy de Montforte (who was one of them which came in hiscompany) to sitte downe by him, and Signior Neri on his other side. Asfor the other three of the traine, hee commaunded them to attend onhis service, as Signior Neri had given order. There wanted noexquisite Viandes and excellent Wines, all performed in most decentmanner, and without the least noise or disturbance, wherein the Kingtooke no little delight.

  • 林文娟 08-05

      Calandrino, every minute ready to sinke under his weightieburthen, entred into his owne house, where (by great ill luck) hiswife, being a comely and very honest woman, and named Monna Trista,was standing aloft on the stayres head. She being somewhat angry forhis so long absence, and seeing him come in grunting and groaning,frowningly said. I thought that the divell would never let thee comehome, all the whole Citie have dined, and yet wee must remaine withoutour dinner. When Calandrino heard this, and perceived that he wasnot invisible to his Wife: full of rage and wroth, hee began to raile,saying. Ah thou wicked woman, where art thou? Thou hast utterly undoneme: but (as I live) I will pay thee soundly for it. Up the staireshe ascended into a small Parlour, where when he hadde spred all hisburthen of stones on the floore: he ran to his wife, catching frerby the haire of the head, and throwing her at his feete; giving her somany spurns and cruel blowes, as shee was not able to moove eitherarmes or legges, notwithstanding all her teares, and humblesubmission.}

  • 张志清 08-05

      Upon this his private frequentation with the Abbot, at last heobserved, that Ferando had a very beautifull woman to his Wife, withwhom he grew so deeply in love, as he had no other meditationseither by day or night, but how to become acceptable in her favour.Neverthelesse, he concealed his amorous passions privately tohimselfe, and could plainely perceive, that although Ferando (in allthings else) was meerely a simple fellow, and more like an Idiot, thenof any sensible apprehension: yet was he wise enough in loving hisWife, keeping her carfully out of all company, as one (indeede) veryjealous, least any should kisse her, but onely himselfe, which drovethe Abbot into despaire, for ever attaining the issue of his desire.Yet being subtill, crafty, and cautelous, he wrought so on theflexible nature of Ferando, that hee brought his wife with himdivers dayes to the Monasterie; where they walked in the goodlyGarden, discoursing on the beatitudes of eternall life, as also themost holy deedes of men and women, long since departed out of thislife, in mervailous civill and modest manner. Yet all these were buttraines to a further intention, for the Abbot must needes be herghostly Father, and she come to be confessed by him; which the fooleFerando tooke as an especiall favour, and therefore he gave hisconsent the sooner.

  • 高翔 08-05

      Sir, yesternight I would have had a fewe speeches with you: but,in regard of your wearinesse and early going to bed, I could nothave any opportunity. Now, this time and place being mostconvenient, I desire to bee resolved by you: Among all the menretained into your service; which of them do you thinke to be thebest, most loyall, and worthiest to enjoy your love? Egano answeredthus: Wife, why should you move such a question to me? Do not youknow, that I never had any servant heeretofore, or ever shall haveheereafter, in whom I reposed the like trust as I have done, and do inAnichino? But to what end is this motion of yours? I will tell you Sir(quoth she) and then be Judge your self, whether I have reason to movethis question, or no. Mine opinion every way equalled yours,concerning Anichino, and that he was more just and faithfull to you,then any could be amongest all the rest: But Husband, like as wherethe water runneth stillest, the Foord is deepest, even so, hissmooth lookes have beguiled both you and me. For, no longer agoe, thenthis verie day, no sooner were you ridden foorth on Hauking, but he(belike purposely) tarrying at home, watching such a leysure as bestfitted his intent: was not ashamed to solicite mee, both to abuse yourbed, and mine owne spotlesse honor.

  • 郭文已 08-04

       When night was come, they went all to visit the dead body ofMaster Chappelet, where they used an especiall and solemne Vigill; andon the morrow, apparelled in their richest Coapes and Vestiments, withbookes in their hands, and the Crosse borne before them, singing inthe forme of a very devoute procession, they brought the bodypompeously into their Church, accompanied with all the people of theTowne, both men and women. The Father Confessor, ascending up into thePulpit, preached wonderfull things of him, and the rare holinesse ofhis life; his fastes, his virginity, simplicity, innocency, and truesanctity, recounting also (among other especiall observations) whatChappelet had confessed, as this most great and greevous sinne, andhow hardly he could be perswaded, that God would grant him pardonfor it. Whereby he tooke occasion to reprove the people thenpresent, saying; And you (accursed of God) for the verie least andtrifling matter hapning, will not spare to blaspheme God, hisblessed Mother, and the whole Court of heavenly Paradise: Oh, takeexample by this singular man, this Saint-like man, nay, a very Saintindeede.

  • 张晓璐 08-02

    {  They which tarried, when they were gone, considering partly on thereasons alleadged by Titus, and partly terrified by his latestspeeches; became induced, to like well of his alliance and amitie,as (with common consent) they concluded: that it was much better toaccept Titus as their kinsman (seeing Gisippus had made manifestrefusall thereof) than to lose the kinred of the one, and procurethe hatred of the other. Wherefore they went to seeke Titus, andsaid unto him, they were very well contented that Sophronia should beehis Wife, hee their deare and loving kinsman, and Gisippus toremaine their much respected friend. And embracing one another, makinga solemne feast, such as in the like cases is necessarilie required,they departed from him, presently sending Sophronia to him, who makinga vertue of necessity, converted her love (in short time after) toTitus, in as effectuall manner, as formerly shee had done to Gisippus,and so was sent away with him to Rome, where she was received andwelcommed with very great honour.

  • 黄土塬 08-02

      Wherefore, young ladies, I beseech you if you would deserve Heaven'sgrace, lend yourselves to the putting of the Devil in Hell; for itis a thing beloved of God, pleasing to the participants, and onefrom which much good comes and ensues.

提交评论