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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:科比·布莱恩特 大小:2pmFGFul14273KB 下载:sUUGbqRI22161次
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日期:2020-08-05 04:10:35
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.
2.  "The ship ran before a fresh North wind till we had reached thesea that lies between Crete and Libya; there, however, Jove counselledtheir destruction, for as soon as we were well out from Crete andcould see nothing but sea and sky, he raised a black cloud over ourship and the sea grew dark beneath it. Then Jove let fly with histhunderbolts and the ship went round and round and was filled withfire and brimstone as the lightning struck it. The men fell all intothe sea; they were carried about in the water round the ship lookinglike so many sea-gulls, but the god presently deprived them of allchance of getting home again. I was all dismayed; Jove, however,sent the ship's mast within my reach, which saved my life, for I clungto it, and drifted before the fury of the gale. Nine days did Idrift but in the darkness of the tenth night a great wave bore me onto the Thesprotian coast. There Pheidon king of the Thesprotiansentertained me hospitably without charging me anything at all forhis son found me when I was nearly dead with cold and fatigue, whereonhe raised me by the hand, took me to his father's house and gave meclothes to wear.
3.  The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, butNeptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to setMars free again. "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as yourequire, that he shall pay you all the damages that are heldreasonable among the immortal gods."
4.  "Maids, servants of Ulysses who has so long been absent, go to thequeen inside the house; sit with her and amuse her, or spin, andpick wool. I will hold the light for all these people. They may staytill morning, but shall not beat me, for I can stand a great deal."
5.  "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.
6.  "For shame," replied Minerva, "why, any one else would trust a worseally than myself, even though that ally were only a mortal and lesswise than I am. Am I not a goddess, and have I not protected youthroughout in all your troubles? I tell you plainly that even thoughthere were fifty bands of men surrounding us and eager to kill us, youshould take all their sheep and cattle, and drive them away withyou. But go to sleep; it is a very bad thing to lie awake all night,and you shall be out of your troubles before long."

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1.  "Some things, Telemachus," answered Minerva, "will be suggested toyou by your own instinct, and heaven will prompt you further; for I amassured that the gods have been with you from the time of your birthuntil now."
2.  "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."
3.  With this he drove his goodly steeds back to the city of the Pyliansand soon reached his home, but Telemachus called the men togetherand gave his orders. "Now, my men," said he, "get everything inorder on board the ship, and let us set out home."
4.  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."
5.  "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."
6.  The suitors bit their lips and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; but Amphinomus the son of Nisus, who was son to Aretias, said,"Do not let us take offence; it is reasonable, so let us make noanswer. Neither let us do violence to the stranger nor to any ofUlysses' servants. Let the cupbearer go round with thedrink-offerings, that we may make them and go home to our rest. As forthe stranger, let us leave Telemachus to deal with him, for it is tohis house that he has come."

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1.  Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesyto your own children, or it may be worse for them. I can read theseomens myself much better than you can; birds are always flying aboutin the sunshine somewhere or other, but they seldom mean anything.Ulysses has died in a far country, and it is a pity you are not deadalong with him, instead of prating here about omens and adding fuel tothe anger of Telemachus which is fierce enough as it is. I suppose youthink he will give you something for your family, but I tell you-and it shall surely be- when an old man like you, who should knowbetter, talks a young one over till he becomes troublesome, in thefirst place his young friend will only fare so much the worse- he willtake nothing by it, for the suitors will prevent this- and in thenext, we will lay a heavier fine, sir, upon yourself than you willat all like paying, for it will bear hardly upon you. As forTelemachus, I warn him in the presence of you all to send his motherback to her father, who will find her a husband and provide her withall the marriage gifts so dear a daughter may expect. Till we shall goon harassing him with our suit; for we fear no man, and care neitherfor him, with all his fine speeches, nor for any fortune-telling ofyours. You may preach as much as you please, but we shall only hateyou the more. We shall go back and continue to eat up Telemachus'sestate without paying him, till such time as his mother leaves offtormenting us by keeping us day after day on the tiptoe ofexpectation, each vying with the other in his suit for a prize of suchrare perfection. Besides we cannot go after the other women whom weshould marry in due course, but for the way in which she treats us."
2.  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. I saw thatheaven meant us a mischief and said, 'You force me to yield, for youare many against one, but at any rate each one of you must take hissolemn oath that if he meet with a herd of cattle or a large flockof sheep, he will not be so mad as to kill a single head of either,but will be satisfied with the food that Circe has given us.'
3.  "As for me I live out of the way here with the pigs, and never go tothe town unless when Penelope sends for me on the arrival of some newsabout Ulysses. Then they all sit round and ask questions, both thosewho grieve over the king's absence, and those who rejoice at itbecause they can eat up his property without paying for it. For my ownpart I have never cared about asking anyone else since the time when Iwas taken in by an Aetolian, who had killed a man and come a longway till at last he reached my station, and I was very kind to him. Hesaid he had seen Ulysses with Idomeneus among the Cretans, refittinghis ships which had been damaged in a gale. He said Ulysses wouldreturn in the following summer or autumn with his men, and that hewould bring back much wealth. And now you, you unfortunate old man,since fate has brought you to my door, do not try to flatter me inthis way with vain hopes. It is not for any such reason that I shalltreat you kindly, but only out of respect for Jove the god ofhospitality, as fearing him and pitying you."
4.  "Hear me," she cried, "Daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove,unweariable. If ever Ulysses while he was here burned you fat thighbones of sheep or heifer, bear it in mind now as in my favour, andsave my darling son from the villainy of the suitors."
5.   Then he went downstairs again, leaving Penelope in an agony ofgrief. There were plenty of seats in the house, but she. had noheart for sitting on any one of them; she could only fling herselfon the floor of her own room and cry; whereon all the maids in thehouse, both old and young, gathered round her and began to cry too,till at last in a transport of sorrow she exclaimed,
6.  BOOK IX.

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1.  "When at last we got to the island where we had left the rest of ourships, we found our comrades lamenting us, and anxiously awaitingour return. We ran our vessel upon the sands and got out of her onto the sea shore; we also landed the Cyclops' sheep, and dividedthem equitably amongst us so that none might have reason tocomplain. As for the ram, my companions agreed that I should have itas an extra share; so I sacrificed it on the sea shore, and burned itsthigh bones to Jove, who is the lord of all. But he heeded not mysacrifice, and only thought how he might destroy my ships and mycomrades.
2.  And Menelaus answered, "Telemachus, if you insist on going I willnot detain you. not like to see a host either too fond of his guest ortoo rude to him. Moderation is best in all things, and not letting aman go when he wants to do so is as bad as telling him to go if hewould like to stay. One should treat a guest well as long as he isin the house and speed him when he wants to leave it. Wait, then, tillI can get your beautiful presents into your chariot, and till you haveyourself seen them. I will tell the women to prepare a sufficientdinner for you of what there may be in the house; it will be at oncemore proper and cheaper for you to get your dinner before settingout on such a long journey. If, moreover, you have a fancy formaking a tour in Hellas or in the Peloponnese, I will yoke myhorses, and will conduct you myself through all our principalcities. No one will send us away empty handed; every one will giveus something- a bronze tripod, a couple of mules, or a gold cup."
3.  SO HERE Ulysses slept, overcome by sleep and toil; but Minervawent off to the country and city of the Phaecians- a people who usedto live in the fair town of Hypereia, near the lawless Cyclopes. Nowthe Cyclopes were stronger than they and plundered them, so their kingNausithous moved them thence and settled them in Scheria, far from allother people. He surrounded the city with a wall, built houses andtemples, and divided the lands among his people; but he was dead andgone to the house of Hades, and King Alcinous, whose counsels wereinspired of heaven, was now reigning. To his house, then, didMinerva hie in furtherance of the return of Ulysses.
4、  As she spoke the goddess dispersed the mist and the land appeared.Then Ulysses rejoiced at finding himself again in his own land, andkissed the bounteous soil; he lifted up his hands and prayed to thenymphs, saying, "Naiad nymphs, daughters of Jove, I made sure that Iwas never again to see you, now therefore I greet you with allloving salutations, and I will bring you offerings as in the old days,if Jove's redoubtable daughter will grant me life, and bring my son tomanhood."
5、  "'Mother,' said I, 'I was forced to come here to consult the ghostof the Theban prophet Teiresias. I have never yet been near theAchaean land nor set foot on my native country, and I have had nothingbut one long series of misfortunes from the very first day that Iset out with Agamemnon for Ilius, the land of noble steeds, to fightthe Trojans. But tell me, and tell me true, in what way did you die?Did you have a long illness, or did heaven vouchsafe you a gentle easypassage to eternity? Tell me also about my father, and the son whomI left behind me; is my property still in their hands, or has some oneelse got hold of it, who thinks that I shall not return to claim it?Tell me again what my wife intends doing, and in what mind she is;does she live with my son and guard my estate securely, or has shemade the best match she could and married again?'

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  • 梁志敏 08-04

      All this he told, but Ulysses was overcome as he heard him, andhis cheeks were wet with tears. He wept as a woman weeps when shethrows herself on the body of her husband who has fallen before hisown city and people, fighting bravely in defence of his home andchildren. She screams aloud and flings her arms about him as he liesgasping for breath and dying, but her enemies beat her from behindabout the back and shoulders, and carry her off into slavery, to alife of labour and sorrow, and the beauty fades from her cheeks-even so piteously did Ulysses weep, but none of those presentperceived his tears except Alcinous, who was sitting near him, andcould hear the sobs and sighs that he was heaving. The king,therefore, at once rose and said:

  • 吕爱月 08-04

      She did not say a word about her own wedding, for she did not liketo, but her father knew and said, "You shall have the mules, mylove, and whatever else you have a mind for. Be off with you, andthe men shall get you a good strong waggon with a body to it that willhold all your clothes."

  • 沈剑 08-04

       WHEN the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus bound on his sandals and took a strong spear that suitedhis hands, for he wanted to go into the city. "Old friend," said he tothe swineherd, "I will now go to the town and show myself to mymother, for she will never leave off grieving till she has seen me. Asfor this unfortunate stranger, take him to the town and let him begthere of any one who will give him a drink and a piece of bread. Ihave trouble enough of my own, and cannot be burdened with otherpeople. If this makes him angry so much the worse for him, but Ilike to say what I mean."

  • 陈博文 08-04

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "The stranger is quitereasonable. He is avoiding the suitors, and is only doing what any oneelse would do. He asks you to wait till sundown, and it will be muchbetter, madam, that you should have him all to yourself, when youcan hear him and talk to him as you will."

  • 莱万多夫斯基 08-03

    {  She did not say a word about her own wedding, for she did not liketo, but her father knew and said, "You shall have the mules, mylove, and whatever else you have a mind for. Be off with you, andthe men shall get you a good strong waggon with a body to it that willhold all your clothes."

  • 褚英娣 08-02

      As she spoke Minerva touched him with her wand and covered himwith wrinkles, took away all his yellow hair, and withered the fleshover his whole body; she bleared his eyes, which were naturally veryfine ones; she changed his clothes and threw an old rag of a wrapabout him, and a tunic, tattered, filthy, and begrimed with smoke; shealso gave him an undressed deer skin as an outer garment, andfurnished him with a staff and a wallet all in holes, with a twistedthong for him to sling it over his shoulder.}

  • 谭少群 08-02

      "And now for yourself- stay here some ten or twelve days longer, andI will then speed you on your way. I will make you a noble presentof a chariot and three horses. I will also give you a beautifulchalice that so long as you live you may think of me whenever you makea drink-offering to the immortal gods."

  • 罗剑 08-02

      "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, he againlit his fire, milked his goats and ewes, all quite rightly, and thenlet each have her own young one; as soon as he had got through withall his work, he clutched up two more of my men, and began eating themfor his morning's meal. Presently, with the utmost ease, he rolled thestone away from the door and drove out his sheep, but he at once putit back again- as easily as though he were merely clapping the lidon to a quiver full of arrows. As soon as he had done so he shouted,and cried 'Shoo, shoo,' after his sheep to drive them on to themountain; so I was left to scheme some way of taking my revenge andcovering myself with glory.

  • 王忠明 08-01

       Telemachus gave him no heed, but sat silently watching his father,expecting every moment that he would begin his attack upon thesuitors.

  • 黎晓兵 07-30

    {  So Eteoneus bustled back and bade other servants come with him. Theytook their sweating hands from under the yoke, made them fast to themangers, and gave them a feed of oats and barley mixed. Then theyleaned the chariot against the end wall of the courtyard, and ledthe way into the house. Telemachus and Pisistratus were astonishedwhen they saw it, for its splendour was as that of the sun and moon;then, when they had admired everything to their heart's content,they went into the bath room and washed themselves.

  • 肖岭 07-30

      "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."

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