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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:熊争妍 大小:6QpZG9me71626KB 下载:nO5G06Lj83423次
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日期:2020-08-09 22:21:34
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李泰祥

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Pyrrhus had quickely brought the Axe, and hewing downe the tree,so soone as the Lady saw it fall; turning her selfe to Nicostratus,she said. Now that I have seene mine honour and honesties enemy laidalong; mine anger is past, and Husband, I freely pardon you:intreating you heartily henceforward, not to presume or imagine,that my love eyther is, or can bee altred from you.
2.  Deare Ladies, the deceites used by men towards your sexe, butespecially Husbands, have bene so great and many, as when it hathsometime happened, or yet may, that husbands are requited in theself-same kinde: you need not finde fault at any such accident, eitherby knowledge thereof afterward, or hearing the same reported by anyone; but rather you should referre it to generall publication, tothe end, that immodest men may know, and finde it for trueth, thatif they have apprehension and capacity; women are therein not a joteinferiour to them. Which cannot but redound to your great benefite,because, when any one knoweth, that another is as cunning andsubtile as himselfe; he will not be so rashly adventurous indeceite. And who maketh any doubt, that if those sleights and trickes,whereof this dayes argument may give us occasion to speake, shouldafterwardes be put in execution by men: would it not minister justreason, of punishing themselves for beguiling you, knowing, that (ifyou please) you have the like abilitie in your owne power? Mine intenttherefore is to tell you, what a woman (though but of meanequalitie) did to her husband, upon a sodaine, and in a moment (as itwere) for her owne safety.
3.  The Provost belonging to the Cathedrall Church of Fiesola, fell inlove with a Gentlewoman, being a widdow, and named Piccarda, who hatedhim as much as he loved her. He imagining, that he lay with her: bythe Gentlewomans Bretheren, and the Byshop under whom he served, wastaken in bed with her Mayde, an ugly, foule, deformed Slut.
4.  THE SONG
5.  The youth gave them attentive hearing, and (in few words) returnedthem answer: That he would not give way to any such travaile,because he knew how to dispose of himselfe in Florence, as well asin any other place he should be sent too. Which when his Tutors heard,they reproved him with many severe speeches: and seeing they could winno other answer from him, they made returne thereof to his Mother. Shestorming extreamly thereat, yet not so much for denying the journey toParis, as in regard of his violent affection to the Maide; gave himvery bitter and harsh language. All which availing nothing, shebegan to speake in a more milde and gentle straine, entreating himwith flattering and affable words, to be governed in this case byhis Tutors good advice. And so farre (in the end) she prevailed withhim, that he yeelded to live at Paris for the space of a yeare, butfurther time he would not grant, and so all was ended.
6.  With these, and the like crosse entercourses, he often mockthimselfe, falling into the contrary, and then to this againe, and fromthe contrary, into another kind of alteration, wasting and consuminghimselfe, not only this day and the night following, but many moreafterward, til he lost both his feeding and sleepe, so that throughdebility of body, he was constrained to keepe his bed. Gisippus, whohad divers dayes noted his melancholly disposition, and now hisfalling into extreamitie of sicknesse, was very sorry to behold it:and with all meanes and inventions he could devise to use, hee bothquestioned the cause of this straunge alteration, and essayed everieway, how hee might best comfort him, never ceassing to demaunde areason, why he should become thus sad and sickely. But Titus afterinfinite importuning (which still he answered) with idle and frivolousexcuses, farre from the truth indeede, and (to the no meane afflictionof his friend) when he was able to use no more contradictions; atlength, in sighes and teares, thus he replyed.

计划指导

1.  The rather to confirme my former speeches, that they which beguilesuch wilfull foolish men; are not to bee blamed, but rather commended.And he unto whom the shame was done, was a Physitian, which camefrom Bologna to Florence; and returned thither againe like unto aBeast, notoriously baffulled and disgraced.
2.  But of all those rich and sumptuous Beds (if pride of mine owneopinion do not deceive me) them two provided for Buffalmaco and me,had hardly any equall: he having the Queene of France as his Ladyand Mistresse, and I, the renowned Queene of England, the onely twochoise beauties of the whole World, and wee appeared so pleasing intheir eyes, as they would have refused the greatest Monarkes on theearth, rather then to bee rejected by us. Now therefore, you mayeasily consider with your selfe, what great reason we have to livemore merrily, then any other men can doe: in regard we enjoy thegracious favour of two such Royall Queenes, receyving also from them(whensoever wee please to commaund them) a thousand or two thousandFlorines at the least, which are both truly and duly sent us. Enjoyingthus the benefit of this high happinesse, we that are companions ofthis Society, do tearme it in our vulgar Language, The Pyrats voyageto Corsica. Because, as Rovers or Pyrats robbe and take away thegoodes of such as they meete withall, even so do we: only thereremaineth this difference betweene us, that they never restore whatthey have taken: which we do immediately afterward, whether it berequired or no. And thus Master Doctor, as to my most endeered friend,I have now revealed the meaning of sayling to Corsica, after themanner of our private Pyracie, and how important the close retentionof the voiage is, you are best able your selfe to judge: In whichregarde, remember your Oathes and faithfull promises, or else I amundone for ever.
3.  Fresco da Celatico, counselled and advised his Neece Cesca: Thatif such as deserved to be looked on, were offensive to her eyes, asshe had often told him; she should forbeare to looke on any.
4.  After that Chappelet had received the Communion, and the otherCeremonies appointed for him; weakenesse encreasing on him more andmore, the very same day of his goodly confession, he died (not longafter) towards the evening. Whereupon the two Brethren tooke order,that all needefull things should be in a readinesse, to have himburied honourably; sending to acquaint the Fathers of the Conventtherewith, that they might come to say their Vigilles, according toprecedent custome, and then on the morrow to fetch the body. Thehonest Friar that had confessed him, hearing he was dead, went tothe Prior of the Convent, and by sound of the house Bell, caused allthe Brethren to assemble together, giving them credibly to understand,that Master Chappelet was a very holy man, as appeared by all theparts of his confession, and made no doubt, but that many miracleswould be wrought by his sanctified body, perswading them to fetch itthither with all devoute solemnity and reverence: whereto the Prior,and all the credulous Brethren presently condiscended very gladly.
5.  Chorus. My teares do plainly prove,
6.  Now by this meanes, he grew great in the grace of King Pedro, whoreplanted him in all the goods and honours which he had before, withverie high and eminent authority. Hereunto the Ambassador added,that hee was entertayned with extraordinary grace, and delivery ofpublike joy and exaltation, when his Wife and Sonne were knowne tobe living, of whom no tydings had at any time bene heard, since thehoure of his surprizall. Moreover, that a swift winged Bark was nowsent thither (upon the happy hearing of this newes) well furnishedwith noble Gentlemen, to attend till their returning backe. We needeto make no doubt concerning the tydings brought by this Ambassadour,nor of the Gentlemens welcome, thus sent to Madame Beritola andGeoffrey; who before they would sit downe at the Table, saluted MesserConrado and his kinde Lady (on the behalfe of Henriet) for all thegreat graces extended to her and her Sonne, with promise of any thing,lying in the power of Henriet, to rest continually at their command.The like they did to Signior Gasparino (whose liberall favours cameunlooked for) with certaine assurance, that when Henriet shouldunderstand what he had done for his other Sonne, the Poore expelled,there would be no defaylance of reciprocall courtesies.

推荐功能

1.  Ricciardo not unacquainted with this her jealous humour, as wellby credible hearing thereof, as also by daily observation, began towith himselfe, that it were best to consider for him, to dissembleamorous affection in some other place, and (henceforward) to set asideall hope, of ever enjoying the love of Madam Catulla, because he wasnow become the servant to another Gentlewoman, pretending (in herhonour) to performe many worthy actions of Armes, Joustes,Tournaments, and all such like noble exercises, as he was wont todoe for Madam Catulla. So that most of the people of Naples, butespecially Madam Catulla, becam perswaded, that his formerfruitlesse love to her was quite changed, and the new elected Lady hadall the glory of his best endevours, persevering so long in thisopinion, as now it passed absolutely for currant. Thus seemed he nowas meere a stranger to her, whose house before he familiarlyfrequented, yet as a neighbour gave her the daies salutations,according as he chanced to see her, or meet her.
2.  But, as excesse of delight is the Nurse to negligence, and begettethsuch an overpresuming boldnesse, as afterward proveth to be saucedwith repentance: so came it to passe with our over-fond Lovers, inbeing taken tardy through their owne folly. After they had manytimes met in this manner, the nights (according to the season) growingshorter and shorter, which their stolne delight made them lesserespective of, then was requisite in an adventure so dangerous: itfortuned, that their amorous pleasure had so farre transported them,and dulled their senses in such sort, by these their continuallnightly watchings; that they both fell fast asleepe, he having hishand closed in hers, and she one arme folded about his body, andthus they slept till broade day light. Old Messer Lizio, whocontinually was the morning Cocke to the whole House, going foorthinto his Garden, saw how his Daughter and Ricciardo were seated at thewindow. In he went againe, and going to his wives Chamber, saide toher. Rise quickly wife, and you shall see, what made your Daughterso desirous to lodge in the Garden Gallery. I perceive that shee lovedto heare the Nightingale, for she hath caught one, and holds himfast in her hand. Is it possible, saide the Mother, that ourDaughter should catch a live Nightingale in the darke? You shall seethat your selfe, answered Messer Lizio, if you will make hast, andgo with me.She, putting on her garments in great haste, followed her Husband,and being come to the Gallery doore, he opened it very softly, andgoing to the window, shewed her how they both sate fast asleepe, andin such manner as hath bene before declared: whereupon, sheeperceiving how Ricciardo and Catharina had both deceived her, wouldhave made an outcry, but that Messer Lizio spake thus to her. Wife, asyou love me, speake not a word, neither make any noyse: for, seeingshee hath loved Ricciardo without our knowledge, and they have hadtheir private meetings in this manner, yet free from any blamefuimputation; he shall enjoy her, and she him. Ricciardo is a Gentleman,well derived, and of rich possessions, it can be no disparagement tous, that Catharina match with him in mariage, which he neithershall, or dare deny to do, in regard of our Lawes severity; forclimbing up to my window with his Ladder of Ropes, whereby his life isforfeited to the Law, except our Daughter please to spare it, as itremaineth in her power to doe, by accepting him as her husband, oryeelding his life up to the Law, which surely she will not suffer,their love agreeing together in such mutuall manner, and headventuring so dangerously for her. Madam Jaquemina, perceiving thather husband spake very reasonably, and was no more offended at thematter; stept side with him behinde the drawne Curtaines, untillthey should awake of themselves. At the last, Ricciardo awaked, andseeing it was so farre in the day, thought himselfe halfe dead, andcalling to Catharina, saide.
3.  Messer Currado, in kinde love to the strangers that hee hadinvited to supper, gave over any further contestation; onely hesaid. Seeing thou assurest me, to let me see thy affirmation fortruth, by other of the same Fowles living (a thing which as yet Inever saw, or heard of) I am content to make proofe thereof tomorrow morning, till then I shall rest satisfied: but, upon my word,if I finde it otherwise, expect such a sound payment, as thy knaveryjustly deserveth, to make thee remember it all thy life time. Thecontention ceassing for the night season, Messer Currado, who thoughhe had slept well, remained still discontented in his minde: arosein the morning by breake of day, and puffing and blowing angerly,called for his horses, commanding Chichibio to mount on one of them;so riding on towards the River, where (earely every morning) he hadseene plenty of Cranes, he sayde to his man; We shall see anonSirra, whether thou or I lyed yesternight.
4.  Now began day-light to appeare, when he (having the rich Ring on hisfinger) wandred on hee knew not whether: till comming to the Sea side,he found the way directing to his Inne, where al his company were withhis Host, who had bene verie carefull for him.
5.   The youth gave them attentive hearing, and (in few words) returnedthem answer: That he would not give way to any such travaile,because he knew how to dispose of himselfe in Florence, as well asin any other place he should be sent too. Which when his Tutors heard,they reproved him with many severe speeches: and seeing they could winno other answer from him, they made returne thereof to his Mother. Shestorming extreamly thereat, yet not so much for denying the journey toParis, as in regard of his violent affection to the Maide; gave himvery bitter and harsh language. All which availing nothing, shebegan to speake in a more milde and gentle straine, entreating himwith flattering and affable words, to be governed in this case byhis Tutors good advice. And so farre (in the end) she prevailed withhim, that he yeelded to live at Paris for the space of a yeare, butfurther time he would not grant, and so all was ended.
6.  Let us now convert our lookes to Wales, to Perotto; being leftethere with the other Lord Marshall, who was the President of thatCountrey. On hee grew in yeeres, choisely respected by his Lord,because hee was most comely of person, and forward to all valiantattempts: so that in Tourneyes, joustes, and other actions of Armes,his like was not to bee found in all the Island, being named onelyPerotto the valiant Piccard, and so was he famed farre and neere. AsGod had not forgotten his Sister, so in mercy he became as mindefullof him; for, a contagious mortalitie hapning in the Country, thegreater part of the people perished thereby, the rest flying thenceinto other partes of the Land, whereby the whole Province becamedispeopled and desolate.

应用

1.  When notice heereof was given to the Potestate, he arose; and sheebeing brought foorth into the Hall before him, he questioned with her,how and by what meanes this accident happened. Beside, he sent fordivers Physitians, to be informed by them, whether the Gentlemanwere poysoned, or otherwise murthered? All of them affirmed thecontrarie, avouching rather, that some Impostumation had engenderedneere his heart, which sodainly breaking, occasioned his as sodainedeath. The Potestate hearing this, and perceiving that Andreana waslittle or nothing at all faulty in the matter, her beauty and goodcarriage, kindled a vitlanous and lustful desire in him towards her,provoking him to the immodest motion, that upon granting hisrequest, he would release her. But when he saw, that all hisperswasions were to no purpose, hee sought to compasse his will byviolence; which like a vertuous and valiant Virago, shee worthilywithstood, defending her honour Nobly, and reprooving him with manyinjurious speeches, such as a lustfull Letcher Justlie deserved.
2.  Having imparted all her fortunes to the good old Lady with whomshe dwelt; she told her beside, that she had an earnest desire tosee Thunis, to satisfie her eyes as well as her eares, concerningthe rumor blazed abroad. The good old Lady commended her desire, and(even as if she had bene her Mother) tooke her with her aboord aBarke, and so sayled thence to Thunis, where both she and Constancefound honourable welcome, in the house of a kinsman to the SarazinLady. Carapresa also went along with them thither, and her they sentabroad into the City, to understand the newes of Martuccio Gomito.After they knew for a certainty that he was living, and in greatauthority about the King, according as the former report went ofhim. Then the good old Lady, being desirous to let Martuccio know,that his faire friend Constance was come thither to see him; wenther selfe to the place of his abiding, and spake unto him in thismanner. Noble Martuccio, there is a servant of thine in my house,which came from Liparis, and requireth to have a little privateconference with thee: but because I durst not trust any other with themessage, my selfe (at her entreaty) am come to acquaint theetherewith. Martuccio gave her kinde and hearty thankes, and thenwent along with her to the house.
3.  That I should find no ease by day or night,
4、  Piero being a Prince, of most liberall and benigne nature, havingafterward divers times considered on the matters which Manutio hadrevealed to him, knowing also the yong Maiden, to bee bothbeautifull and vertuous: was so much moved with pitty of herextremitie, as mounting on horsebacke in the evening, and seeming asif he rode abroad for his private recreation; he went directly tothe Apothecaries house, where desiring to see a goodly garden,appertaining then to the Apothecarie, he dismounted from his horse.Walking into the garden, he began to question with Bernardo,demaunding him for his Daughter, and whether he had (as yet) marryedher, or no? My Gracious Lord, answered Bernardo, as yet shee is notmarryed, neither likely to bee, in regard shee hath had a long andtedious sickenesse: but since Dinner time, she is indifferentlyeased of her former violent paine, which we could not discerne thelike alteration in her, a long while before.
5、  Now for your better understanding the quality of the place, and whatensued thereupon, it is not unnecessary to describe it, according to acommon use, observed in those parts. There was a narrow passage orentrie, as often we see reserved betweene two houses, for eithersbenefit to such a needfull place; and boards loosely lay upon thejoynts, which such as were acquainted withall, could easily avoide anyperille in passing to or from the stoole. But our so newly createdBrother, not dreaming to find a Queane to his Sister, receiving sofoule a fall into the vault, and knowing not how to helpe himselfe,being sorrowfull beyond measure; cryed out to the boy for light andaide, who intended not to give him any. For the crafty wag, (a meeteattendant for so honest a Mistresse) no sooner heard him to be fallen,but presently he ran to enforme her thereof, and shee as speedilyreturned to the Chamber, where finding his cloathes under the bedshead, shee needed no instruction for search of his pockets. But havingfound the gold, which Andrea indiscreetely carried alwayes abouthim, as thinking it could no where else be so safe: This was allshee aymed at, and for which shee had ensnared him, faigning her selfeto be of Palermo, and Daughter to Piero of Perouse, so that notregarding him any longer, but making fast the house of Office doore,there she left him in that miserable taking.Poore Andrea perceiving, that his calles could get no answere fromthe Lad; cryed out louder, but all to no purpose: when seeing into hisowne simplicity, and understanding his error, though somewhat toolate, hee made such meanes constrainedly, that he got over a wall,which severed that foule sinke from the Worlds eye; and being in theopen streete, went to the doore of the House, which then he knew toowell to his cost, making loud exclaimes with rapping and knocking, butall as fruitelesse as before. Sorrowing exceedingly, and manifestlybeholding his misfortune; Alas (quoth he) how soone have I lost aSister, and five hundred Crownes besides? With many other words,loud calles, and beatings uppon the doore without intermission, theneighbours finding themselves disturbed, and unable to endure any suchceaselesse vexation, rose from their beddes, and called to him,desiring him to be gone, and let them rest. A Maide also of the samehouse, looking forth at the window, and seeming as newly raised fromsleepe, called to him, saying; What noyse is that beneath? WhyVirgin (answered Andrea) know you not me? I am Andrea de Piero,Brother to your Mistresse Fiordeliza. Thou art a drunken knave replyedthe Maide, more full of drinke then wit: goe sleepe, goe sleepe, andcome againe to morrow: for I know no Andrea de Piero, neither hathmy Mistresse any such Brother. Get thee gone go ie good man, andsuffer us to sleepe I prythee. How now (quoth Andrea) doest thou notunderstand what I say? Thou knowest that I supt with thy Mistressethis night; but if our Sicilian kindred be so soone forgot, Iprythee give mee my Cloathes which I left in my Chamber, and thenverie gladly will I get mee gone. Hereat the Maide laughing outaloude, saide; Surely the man is mad, or walketh the streetes in adreame: and so clasping fast the Window, away she went and left him.Now could Andrea assure himselfe, that his Golde and cloathes werepast recovery, which mooving him to the mor impatience, his formerintercessions became converted into furie, and what hee could notcompasse by faire intreats, he intended to winne by outrage andviolence: so that taking up a great stone in his hand, hee layedupon the doore verie powerfull strokes. The neighbors hearing thismollestation still, admitting them not the least respite of rest,reputed him for a troublesome fellow, and that he used thosecounterfet words, onely to disturbe the Mistresse of the house, andall that dwelled neere about her; looking againe out at theirwindowes, they altogether beganne to rate and reprove him, even likeso many bawling Curres, barking at a strange dog passing through thestreet. This is shamefull villany (quoth one) and not to besuffered, that honest women should thus be molested in their houses,with foolish idle words, and at such an unseasonable time of thenight. For Gods sake (good man) be gone, and let us sleepe; if thouhave any thing to say to the Gentlewoman of the house, come tomorrowin the daytime, and no doubt but she will make thee sufficient answer.

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网友评论(StpkFWf426215))

  • 邹进文 08-08

      This Song gave occasion to the whole Company, to imagine, thatsome new and pleasing apprehension of Love, constrained MadamePhilomena to sing in this manner. And because (by the discoursethereof) it plainely appeared, that shee had felt more then sheesaw, shee was so much the more happy, and the like was wished by allthe rest. Wherefore, after the Song was ended; the Queeneremembring, that the next day following was Friday, turning herselfe graciously to them all, thus she spake.

  • 刘洞天 08-08

      Now began Sir Simon to shrug, and scratch his head, thinking this tobe a fit convenient time, for him to goe visite Belcolore, and to maketriall of his fortune: wherefore, setting aside all other businesse,he stayed no where till he came to the house, whereinto beingentred, he saide: All happinesse be to them that dwell heere.Belcolore being then above in the Chamber, when she heard histongue, replyed. Sweet Sir Simon! you are heartely welcome, whetherare you walking, if the question may bee demaunded? Beleeve medainty Ducke, answered Sir Simon, I am come to sit a while withthee, because I met thy Husband going to the Citie. By this time,Belcolore was descended downe the stayres, and having once againegiven welcome to Sir Simon, she sate downe by him, cleansing ofColewort seeds from such other course chaffe, which her Husband hadprepared before his departure.

  • 张弘范 08-08

       At last Pedro tooke heart, and saide: I would this showre wouldnever cease, that I might be alwayes where I am. The like could Iwish, answered Violenta, so we were in a better place of safety. Thesewishes drew on other gentle language, with modest kisses and embraces,the onely ease to poore Lovers soules; so that the raine ceased not,till they had taken order for their oftner conversing, and absoluteplighting of their faiths together. By this time the storme wasfairely over-blowne, and they attending on the way, till the Motherand the rest were come, with whom they returned to Trapani, where bywise and provident meanes, they often conferred in private together,and enjoyed the benefit of their amorous desires, yet free from anyill surmise or suspition.

  • 李红军 08-08

      Anastasio, answered the Knight, I am of the same City as thou art,and do well remember, that thou wast a little Ladde, when I (who wasthen named Guido Anastasio, and thine Unckle) became as intirely inlove with this woman, as now thou art of Paulo Traversarioes daughter.But through her coy disdaine and cruelty, such was my heavy fate, thatdesperately I slew my selfe with this short sword which thou beholdestin mine hand: for which rash sinfull deede, I was, and am condemned toeternall punishment. This wicked woman, rejoycing immeasurably in mineunhappy death, remained no long time alive after me, and for hermercilesse sinne of cruelty, and taking pleasure in my oppressingtorments; dying unrepentant, and in pride of her scorne, she had thelike sentence of condemnation pronounced on her, and sent to thesame place where I was tormented.

  • 赖炳文 08-07

    {  THE HARME OF THE DEVISER

  • 何志毅 08-06

      This girl, a heathen in a place where many were Christian, usedoften to hear her neighbours extol the Christian faith and devotion tothe service of God; wherefore she asked one of them how God could bestbe served and with the least hindrance. She was told that they bestserved Him who removed themselves farthest from the things of theworld, as in particular the hermits who had withdrawn from the city tothe wilds of Thebais.}

  • 黄坦 08-06

      Now was Saladine and his Baschaes halfe astonyed with admiration, atthe magnificent minde of Signiour Thorello, who would not forget theleast part of courtesie towardes them, and greatly doubted (seeing thebeauty and riches of the Garments) least they were discovered byThorello. Neverthelesse, one of them thus answered the Lady. Beleeveme Madame, these are rich guiftes, not lightly either to be given,rich or receyved: but in regard of your strict imposition, we arenot able to deny them. This being done, with most gracious andcourteous demeanour, she departed from them, leaving her Husband tokeepe them still companie; who furnished their servants also, withdivers worthy necessaries fitting for their journey.

  • 叶时湘 08-06

      Brokers are continually there attending, being informed in thequality of the Merchandises stored, and likewise to what Merchantsthey appertaine: by meanes of these men, and according as the goodscome to their hands, they devise to have them exchaunged, trucked,vented, and such other kinds of dispatches, answerable to the mensminds, and worth of the Commodities. As in many other Kingdomes andCountries, so was this custome observed at Palermo in Sicily, wherelikewise then were, and (no doubt) now adayes are, store of Women,faire and comely of person, but yet vowed enemies to honesty.

  • 崔波 08-05

       Could have lesse heart-greeving,

  • 白云天 08-03

    {  The Launce that won him Honour, hath me slaine,

  • 盛世欣 08-03

      Nevertheless, purposing to make no apparance of his furtherintention, he did nothing else to him, but drawing forth a paire ofsheares, which purposely he brought thither with him, he clippedaway a part of his lockes, which (in those times) they used to wearevery long, to the end that he might the better know him the nextmorning, and so returned backe to his lodging againe. The Querry,who partly saw, but felt what was done to him; perceived plainely(being a subtill ingenious fellow) for what intent he was thus marked.Wherefore, without any longer dallying, up he rose, and taking a paireof sheares, wherewith they used to trim their Horses; softly he wentfrom bed to bed, where they all lay yet soundly sleeping, and cliptaway each mans locke from his right eare, in the selfe same manneras the King had done his, and being not perceived by any one ofthem, quietly he laide him downe againe.

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