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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:胡安明 大小:83aSkoap76650KB 下载:rpueBsJW51297次
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日期:2020-08-10 07:27:29
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  By this time Madam Philomena, at command of the King, (MadamPampinea ceasing) prepared to follow next in order, whereupon thus shebegan. What is it (Gracious Ladies) that Kings cannot do (if theylist) in matters of greatest importance, and especially unto such asmost they should declare their magnificence? He then that performethwhat he ought to do, when it is within his owne power, doth well.But it is not so much to bee admired, neither deserveth halfe thecommendations, as when one man doth good to another, when least itis expected, as being out of his power, and yet performed. In whichrespect, because you have so extolled king Piero, as appearing notmeanly meritorious in your judgements; I make no doubt but you will bemuch more pleased, when the actions of our equals are duly considered,and shal paralell any of the greatest Kings. Wherefore I purpose totell you a Novel, concerning an honorable curtesie of two worthyfriends.
2.  Within a while after, pretending to have some speech withGianetta, and holding the Gentleman still by the arme, the Physicioncaused her to be sent for; and immediately shee came. Upon her veryentrance into the Chamber, the pulse began to beate againe extreamely,and when shee departed, it presently ceased. Now was he thorowlyperswaded, that he had found the true effect of his sicknesse, whentaking the Father and mother aside, thus he spake to them. If you bedesirous of your Sons health, it consisteth not either in Physicion orphysicke, but in the mercy of your faire Maide Gianetta; formanifest signes have made it knowne to me, and he loveth theDamosell very dearely: yet (for ought I can perceive, the Maide dothnot know it:) now if you have respect of his life, you know (in thiscase) what is to be done. The Nobleman and his Wife hearing this,became somewhat satisfied, because there remained a remedy to preservehis life: but yet it was no meane griefe to them, if it should sosucceede, as they feared, namely, the marriage betweene this theirSonne and Gianetta.
3.  A comely youthfull Gentleman of our City, became amorouslyaffected to the Damosell, resorting thither divers times as heetravelled on the way, to expresse how much he did respect her. And sheaccounting her fortune none of the meanest, to bee beloved by soyouthfull a Gallant, declared such vertuous and modest demeanour, asmight deserve his best opinion of her: so that their love grew to anequall simpathy, and mutuall contentment of them both, inexpectation of further effects; he being named Panuccio, and sheNicholletta.
4.  Last of all consider also, how difficult a thing it is for awoman, so sodainly to raise the summe of a thousand golden Florines,when one friend promiseth, and performeth not; another protesteth, yethath no such meaning; a third sweareth, and yet proveth a falseLyar: so that by being thus ungently used, a breach is made betweenethe best frends living. From hence it proceeded, and no other defectelse, that I made not due returne of your five hundred Florins. Nosooner were you departed her but I had them readie, and as manymore, and could I have knowne whither to send them, they had bene withyou long time since, which because I could not (by any meanes)compasse, I kept them still for you in continuall readinesse, ashoping of your comming hither againe. So causing a purse to bebrought, wherein the same Florines were, which hee had deliveredher; she gave it into his hand, and prayed him to count them over,whether there were so many, or no.
5.  Adam Philomena having concluded her discourse, and the rareacknowledgement, which Titus made of his esteemed friend Gisippus,extolled justly as it deserved by all the Company: the King, reservingthe last office to Dioneus (as it was at the first granted him)began to speake thus. Without all question to the contrary (worthyLadies) nothing can be more truely said, then what Madame Philomena,hath delivered, concerning Amity, and her complaint in theconclusion of her Novell, is not without great reason, to see it soslenderly reverenced and respected (now a dayes) among all men. But ifwe had met here in duty onely for correcting the abuses of iniquity,and the malevolent courses of this preposterous age; I could proceedfurther in this just cause of complaint. But because our end aimeth atmatters of other nature, it commeth to my memory to tel you of aHistory, which (perhaps) may seeme somewhat long, but altogetherpleasant, concerning a magnificent act of great Saladine: to theend, that by observing those things which you shall heare in myNovell, if we cannot (by reason of our manifold imperfections)intirely compasse the amity of any one; yet (at least) we may takedelight, in stretching our kindnesse (in good deeds) so farre as weare able, in hope one day after, some worthy reward will ensuethereon, as thereto justly appertaining.
6.  And welcome now those sad annoies

计划指导

1.  When day appeared, and the violent stormes were more mildly appeasedthe Ladie, who seemed well-neere dead, lifted up her head, and began(weake as she was) to call first one, and then another: but sheecalled in vaine, for such as she named were farre enough from her.Wherefore, hearing no answere, nor seeing any one, she wondredgreatly, her feares encreasing then more and more. Raising her selfeso well as shee could, she beheld the Ladies that were of her company,and some other of her women, lying still without any stirring:whereupon, first jogging one, and then another, and calling themseverally by their names; shee found them bereft of understanding, andeven as if they were dead, their hearts were so quayled, and theirfeare so over-ruling, which was no meane dismay to the poore Ladyher selfe. Neverthelesse, necessity now being her best counsellor,seeing her selfe thus all alone, and not knowing in what place sheewas, shee used such meanes to them that were living, that (at thelast) they came to better knowledge of themselves. And being unable toguesse, what was become of the men and Marriners, seeing the Ship alsodriven on the sands, and filled with water, she began with them tolament most greevously: and now it was about the houre of mid day,before they could descry any person on the shore, or any els to pitythem in so urgent a necessity.
2.  Daughter, I could have wisht, that thou hadst taken such an Husband,as (in my judgement) had bene best fitting for thee: yet if thoumadest election of one answerable to thine owne good liking, I have nojust reason to be offended therewith. My greatest cause of complaintis, thy too severe concealing it from me, and the small trust thoudidst repose in me, because thou hast lost him before I knew him.Neverthelesse, seeing these occasions are thus come to passe, andaccidents already ended, cannot possibly be re-called, it is mywill, that as I would gladly have contented thee, by making him my Sonin Law if he had lived, so I wil expresse the like love to him nowhe is dead. And so turning himselfe to his kindred and friends,lovingly requested of them, that they would grace Gabriello withmost honourable obsequies.
3.  The answer of Lisana pleased the Queene exceedingly, in findingher to be so wise and faire, as the King himself had before informedher: who instantly called for her Father and Mother, and knowingthey would be well pleased with whatsoever he did; he called for aproper yong Gentleman, but somewhat poore, being named Perdicano,and putting certaine Rings into his hand, which he refused not toreceive, caused him there to espouse Lisana. To whome the King gaveimmediately (besides Chaines and jewels of inestimable valew,delivered by the Queene to the Bride) Ceffala and Calatabelotta, twogreat territories abounding in divers wealthy possessions, saying toPerdicano. These wee give thee, as a dowry in marriage with thisbeautifull Maid, and greater gifts we will bestow on thee hereafter,as we shal perceive thy love and kindnesse to her.
4.  But, seeing thou art so constant in thy pernitious resolve, asneither thine owne good Nature, nor this lamentable sufferance inme, are able to alter thee: I will prepare my self for deathpatiently, to the end, that Heaven may be mercifull to my soul, andreward thee justly, according to thy cruelty. Which words being ended,she withdrew her selfe towards the middest of the Tarras, despairingof escaping (with life)
5.  True it is, that if it be spoken by way of answer, and theanswerer biteth doggedly, because himselfe was bitten in the samemanner before: he is the lesse to bee blamed, because hee makethpayment but with coine of the same stampe. In which respect, anespeciall care is to bee had, how, when, with whom, and where wejest or gibe, whereof very many proove too unmindfull, as appeared(not long since) by a Prelate of ours, who met with a byting, no lessesharpe and bitter, then had first come from himselfe before, asverie briefely I intend to tell you how.
6.  One in the company constantly avouched, that of all the Women bythem so generally observed, there was not any comparable to the Wifeof Egano de Galluzzi, dwelling in Bologna, and her name Madam Beatrix,reputed to be the onely faire woman of the world. Many of the restmaintained as much, having bin at Bologna, and likewise seene her.Lodovico hearing the woman to be so highly commended, and never (asyet) feeling any thought of amorous inclination; became sodainelytoucht with an earnest desire of seeing her, and his minde couldentertaine no other matter, but onely of travailing thither to seeher, yea, and to continue there, if occasion so served. The reason forhis journey urged to his Father, was to visit Jerusalem, and theholy Sepulcher, which with much difficulty, at length he obtainedhis leave.

推荐功能

1.  Marcus Varro stood like a man confounded with admiration, being verysorrie, for that which the whole assistants had both seene andheard, yet hee could not (with honour) desist from what must needsbe done, but would performe the Lawes severe injunction. And sendingfor condemned Gisippus backe againe, in the presence of Titus, thus hespake to him. How becamest thou so madly incensed, as (without anytorment inflicted on thee) to confesse an offence by thee nevercommitted? Art thou wearie of thy life? Thou chargest thy selfefalsly, to be the person who this last night murdered the man in theCave, and there is another that voluntarily also doth confesse hisguiltinesse.
2.  The King, who (till then) had beene very bad, dull, and slothfull,even as sleeping out his time of governement; beganne to revenge thewrongs done to this Gentlewoman very severely, and (thence forward)became a most sharpe Justicer, for the least offence offered againstthe honour of his Crowne, or to any of his subjects beside.
3.  Can I never finde
4.  Finding his doore to be fast lockt, and he having knockt softlieonce or twice, he spake in this manner to himselfe. Fortune I thankethee, for albeit thou hast made mee poore, yet thou hast bestowed abetter blessing on me, in matching me with so good, honest, and lovinga Wife. Behold, though I went early out of my house, her selfe hathrisen in the cold to shut the doore, to prevent the entrance oftheeves, or any other that might offend us. Peronella having heardwhat her husband sayde, and knowing the manner of his knocke, saidfearfully to Striguario. Alas deare friend, what shall wee doe? I amlittle lesse then a dead Woman: For, Lazaro my Husband is come backeagain, and I know not what to do or say. He never returned in thisorder before now, doubtlesse, hee saw when you entred the doore; andfor the safety of your honour and mine: creepe under this brewing Fat,till I have opened the doore, to know the reason of his so soonereturning.
5.   HONOURABLE OCCASION
6.  So gently as possible he could, and with the helpe of his man, hetooke her forth of the monument, and layingher softly on his horsebefore him, conveighed her closely to his house in Bologna. SigniorGentile had a worthy Lady to his Mother, a woman of great wisdomeand vertue, who understanding by her Sonne, how matters hadhappened, moved with compassion, and suffering no one in the houseto know what was done, made a good fire, and very excellent Bathe,which recalled back againe wrongwandering life. Then fetching avehement sigh, opening her eyes, and looking very strangly abouther, she said. Alas! where am I now? whereto the good old Ladykindly replyed, saying. Comfort your selfe Madame, for you are in agood place.

应用

1.  Often she would come to Rustico and say: "Father, I came hither toserve God, not to stand idle. Let us go put the Devil in Hell." Andonce, when it had been done, she asked: "Rustico, why does he wantto get out of Hell? If only he would stay there as willingly as Helltakes him in and holds him, he would never want to come out at all."By thus constantly egging him on and exhorting him to God's servicethe girl so preyed upon Rustico that he shivered with cold whenanother man would have sweated. He had perforce to tell her that itwas not just to punish the Devil by putting him in Hell save when hehad lifted his head in pride; and that by God's mercy they had sochastened him that he only implored Heaven to be left in peace. Thusfor a time he silenced her.
2.  That I should find no ease by day or night,
3.  When the Pilgrim had finished his speeches, the Gentlewoman whohad listned to them very attentively (because all the edged reasonsappeared to be plainly true) became verily perswaded, that all theseafictions had falne on her and her father, for the ingratefull offenceby her committed, and therefore thus is replied. Worthy man, and thefriend to goodnesse, I know undoubtedly, that the words which you havespoken are true, and also I understand by your demonstration, whatmanner of people some of those religious persons are, whomheretofore I have reputed to be Saints, but find them now to be farotherwise. And to speake truly, I perceive the fault to be great andgreevous, wherein I have offended against Theobaldo, and would (if Icould) willingly make amends, even in such manner as you have advised.But how is it possible to be done? Theobaldo being dead, can be [no]more recalled to this life; and therefore, I know not what promise Ishould make, in a matter which is not to bee performed. Whereto thePilgrime without any longer pausing, thus answered.
4、  No soule so comfortlesse, etc.
5、  What can now be saide to the contrary, but that poore CountryCottages, may yeeld as divine and excellent spirits, as the moststately and Royall mansions, which breed and bring uppe some, moreworthy to be Hog-rubbers, then hold any soveraignty over men? Where isany other (beside Grizelda) who not only without a wet eye, butimboldned by a valiant and invincible courage: that can suffer thesharpe rigors, and (never the like heard of proofes) made by theMarquesse? Perhaps he might have met with another, who would havequitted him in a contrary kinde, and for thrusting her forth of dooresin her smocke, could have found better succor somewhere else, ratherthen walke so nakedly in the cold streets.

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  • 西安—泰国甲米岛 08-09

      Aniolliero chancing to awake, arose and made him ready, withoutany servant to helpe him; then calling for Fortarigo, and nothearing any tydings of him: he began immediately to imagine, that hewas become drunke, and so had falne asleepe in one place or other,as very often he was wont to doe. Wherefore, determining so to leavehim, he caused the male and Saddle to be set on his horse, and so tofurnish himselfe with a more honest servant at Corsignano.

  • 陈竞超 08-09

      Now for your better understanding the quality of the place, and whatensued thereupon, it is not unnecessary to describe it, according to acommon use, observed in those parts. There was a narrow passage orentrie, as often we see reserved betweene two houses, for eithersbenefit to such a needfull place; and boards loosely lay upon thejoynts, which such as were acquainted withall, could easily avoide anyperille in passing to or from the stoole. But our so newly createdBrother, not dreaming to find a Queane to his Sister, receiving sofoule a fall into the vault, and knowing not how to helpe himselfe,being sorrowfull beyond measure; cryed out to the boy for light andaide, who intended not to give him any. For the crafty wag, (a meeteattendant for so honest a Mistresse) no sooner heard him to be fallen,but presently he ran to enforme her thereof, and shee as speedilyreturned to the Chamber, where finding his cloathes under the bedshead, shee needed no instruction for search of his pockets. But havingfound the gold, which Andrea indiscreetely carried alwayes abouthim, as thinking it could no where else be so safe: This was allshee aymed at, and for which shee had ensnared him, faigning her selfeto be of Palermo, and Daughter to Piero of Perouse, so that notregarding him any longer, but making fast the house of Office doore,there she left him in that miserable taking.Poore Andrea perceiving, that his calles could get no answere fromthe Lad; cryed out louder, but all to no purpose: when seeing into hisowne simplicity, and understanding his error, though somewhat toolate, hee made such meanes constrainedly, that he got over a wall,which severed that foule sinke from the Worlds eye; and being in theopen streete, went to the doore of the House, which then he knew toowell to his cost, making loud exclaimes with rapping and knocking, butall as fruitelesse as before. Sorrowing exceedingly, and manifestlybeholding his misfortune; Alas (quoth he) how soone have I lost aSister, and five hundred Crownes besides? With many other words,loud calles, and beatings uppon the doore without intermission, theneighbours finding themselves disturbed, and unable to endure any suchceaselesse vexation, rose from their beddes, and called to him,desiring him to be gone, and let them rest. A Maide also of the samehouse, looking forth at the window, and seeming as newly raised fromsleepe, called to him, saying; What noyse is that beneath? WhyVirgin (answered Andrea) know you not me? I am Andrea de Piero,Brother to your Mistresse Fiordeliza. Thou art a drunken knave replyedthe Maide, more full of drinke then wit: goe sleepe, goe sleepe, andcome againe to morrow: for I know no Andrea de Piero, neither hathmy Mistresse any such Brother. Get thee gone go ie good man, andsuffer us to sleepe I prythee. How now (quoth Andrea) doest thou notunderstand what I say? Thou knowest that I supt with thy Mistressethis night; but if our Sicilian kindred be so soone forgot, Iprythee give mee my Cloathes which I left in my Chamber, and thenverie gladly will I get mee gone. Hereat the Maide laughing outaloude, saide; Surely the man is mad, or walketh the streetes in adreame: and so clasping fast the Window, away she went and left him.Now could Andrea assure himselfe, that his Golde and cloathes werepast recovery, which mooving him to the mor impatience, his formerintercessions became converted into furie, and what hee could notcompasse by faire intreats, he intended to winne by outrage andviolence: so that taking up a great stone in his hand, hee layedupon the doore verie powerfull strokes. The neighbors hearing thismollestation still, admitting them not the least respite of rest,reputed him for a troublesome fellow, and that he used thosecounterfet words, onely to disturbe the Mistresse of the house, andall that dwelled neere about her; looking againe out at theirwindowes, they altogether beganne to rate and reprove him, even likeso many bawling Curres, barking at a strange dog passing through thestreet. This is shamefull villany (quoth one) and not to besuffered, that honest women should thus be molested in their houses,with foolish idle words, and at such an unseasonable time of thenight. For Gods sake (good man) be gone, and let us sleepe; if thouhave any thing to say to the Gentlewoman of the house, come tomorrowin the daytime, and no doubt but she will make thee sufficient answer.

  • 劳伦斯·皮欧 08-09

       And for your better information in every particulare; a Beaste,blacke and horned, but of no great stature, will come to fetch you:perhaps he will use some gastly noises, straunge leapes, and loftietrickes, onely to terrifie and affright you: but when he perceiveththat he cannot daunt you, hee will gently come neere you, which whenhe hath done, you may descend from off the Tombe; and, withoutnaming or thinking on God, or any of his Saintes, mount boldly onhis backe, for he will stand ready to receive you. Being so seated,crosse your armes over your brest, without presuming to touch orhandle the Beast, for he will carry you thence softly, and so bringyou along to the company. But if in all this time of your travaile,you call on heaven, any Saint, or bee possessed with the least thoughtof feare: I must plainely tell you, that either hee will cast youdangerously, or throw you into some noysom place. And therefore, ifyou know your selfe, not to be of a constant courage, and sprightlybold, to undertake such an adventure as this: never presume anyfurther, because you may doe us a great deale of injurie, withoutany gaine or benefite to your selfe, but rather such wrong, as wewould be very sorry should happen unto so deere a Friend.

  • 何多苓 08-09

      Joy and Delight

  • 孙徐骥 08-08

    {  Where the Queen, looking on Madam Philomena, gave her the honor ofbeginning the first Novell for that day: whereto shee dutifullycondiscending, began as followeth.

  • 符章林 08-07

      But when the affayres were fully concluded, for which they werthus sent to Florence, and their parting preparation in duereadinesse: Messer Geri made a very sumptuous Feast for them, invitingthereto the most part of the honourablest Citizens, and Cistio to beone amongst them; who (by no meanes) would bee seene in an assembly ofsuch State and pompe, albeit he was thereto (by the saide Messer Geri)most earnestly entreated.}

  • 郝黎 08-07

      STRAITE IN ANY OF HIS ATTEMPTS; YET HEE CAN

  • 李春妮 08-07

      Alessandro, his Princesse and her traine thus leaving Rome, theywould needes visite Florence, where the newes of this accident was(long before) noysed, and they received by the Citizens in royallmanner. There did shee deliver the three brethren out of prison,having first payed all their debts, and reseated them againe (withtheir wives) in their former inheritances and possessions.Afterward, departing from Florence, and Agolanto, one of the Unclestravailing with them to Paris; they were there also most honourablyentertained by the King of France. From whence the two Knights wentbefore for England, and prevailed so successefully with the King; thathee received his daughter into grace and favour, as also his Sonnein law her husband, to whom hee gave the order of Knighthoode, and(for his greater dignitie) created him Earle of Cornewall.

  • 罗赛 08-06

       The magnificence and Royall bounty, which King Alphonso bestowedon the Florentine knight, passed through the whole assembly withmean applause, and the King (who gave the greatest praise of al)commanded Madame Eliza, to take the second turne in order;whereupon, thus she began. Faire Ladies, if a king shewed himselfemagnificently minded, and expressed his liberall bounty to such a man,as had done him good and honourable services: it can be termed no morethen a vertuous deed well done, and becomming a King. But what will wesay, when we heare that a Prelate of the Church, shewed himselfewondrously magnificent, and to such a one as was his enemy: can anymalicious tongue speake ill of him? Undoubtedly, no other answere isto be made, but the action of the King was meerely vertue, and that ofthe Prelate, no lesse then a miracle: for how can it be otherwise,when they are more greedily covetous then women, and deadly enemies toall liberality? And although every man (naturally) desireth revengefor injuries and abuses done unto him: yet men of the Church, inregard that dayly they preached patience, and commaund (above allthings else) remission of sinnes: it would appeare a mighty blemish inthem, to be more froward and furious then other men. But I am tospeake of a reverend Prelate of the Church, as also concerning hismunificent bounty, to one that was his enemy, and yet became hisreconciled friend, as you shall perceive by my Novell.

  • 图—阿灿 08-04

    {  Bruno, as heaven knoweth, there is not this day any creature living,for whom I would gladly do more, then for thee, and the very leastword of thy mouth, hath power to commaund mee to goe bare-footed, evenfrom hence so farre as to Peretola, and account my labour wellemployed for thy sake: wherefore, never wonder at my continuallkindnesse towards thee, using thee as my Domesticke companion, andembracing thee as my bosome friend, and therefore I am the bolder inmooving one request unto thee. As thou well knowest, it is no longwhile since, when thou diddest acquaint me with the behaviour of theCorsicane Roving Company, to be one in so rare and excellent aSociety, such hath bin my earnest longing ever since, as day nor nighthave I enjoyed anie rest, but should thinke my felicity beyond allcompare, if I could be entertained in fellowship among you.

  • 王怡华 08-04

      Alas sweete Belcolore answered Sir Simon, I never beare any such sumabout me, for men of our profession, doe seldome carry any money atall: but beleeve me on my word, before Saturday come, I will not faileto bring them hither. Oh Sir (quoth Belcolore) you men are quickepromisers, but slow performers. Doe you thinke to use me, as pooreBillezza was, who trusted to as faire words, and found her selfedeceived? Now Sir Simon, her example in being made scandall to theworld, is a sufficient warning for me: if you be not so provided,goe and make use of your friend, for I am not otherwise to be moved.Nay Belcolore (quoth he) I hope you will not serve me so, but myword shall be of better worth with you. Consider the conveniency oftime, wee being so privately here alone: whereas at my returninghither againe, some hinderance may thwart me, and the like opportunitybe never obtained. Sir, she) you have heard my resolution; if you willfetche the Florines, doe; otherwise, walke about your businesse, for Iam a woman of my word.

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