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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:洪某赠 大小:qtGpYmND91934KB 下载:Ae8Nrwiv30876次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:VutcG3rw51391条
日期:2020-08-10 01:45:06
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陈德容

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  When he had said this, he seated himself beside Alcinous. Supper wasthen served, and the wine was mixed for drinking. A servant led in thefavourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company,near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he mightlean against it. Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork withplenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and saidto a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tellhim to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salutehim none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout theworld, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."
2.  As he spoke he made a sign with his eyebrows, and Telemachusgirded on his sword, grasped his spear, and stood armed beside hisfather's seat.
3.  "'First he will look over all his seals, and count them; then,when he has seen them and tallied them on his five fingers, he will goto sleep among them, as a shepherd among his sheep. The moment you seethat he is asleep seize him; put forth all your strength and holdhim fast, for he will do his very utmost to get away from you. He willturn himself into every kind of creature that goes upon the earth, andwill become also both fire and water; but you must hold him fast andgrip him tighter and tighter, till he begins to talk to you andcomes back to what he was when you saw him go to sleep; then you mayslacken your hold and let him go; and you can ask him which of thegods it is that is angry with you, and what you must do to reachyour home over the seas.'
4.  When Ulysses and Penelope had had their fill of love they felltalking with one another. She told him how much she had had to bear inseeing the house filled with a crowd of wicked suitors who hadkilled so many sheep and oxen on her account, and had drunk so manycasks of wine. Ulysses in his turn told her what he had suffered,and how much trouble he had himself given to other people. He told hereverything, and she was so delighted to listen that she never wentto sleep till he had ended his whole story.
5.  Irus began to be very uneasy as he heard them, but the servantsgirded him by force, and brought him [into the open part of the court]in such a fright that his limbs were all of a tremble. Antinousscolded him and said, "You swaggering bully, you ought never to havebeen born at all if you are afraid of such an old broken-down creatureas this tramp is. I say, therefore- and it shall surely be- if hebeats you and proves himself the better man, I shall pack you off onboard ship to the mainland and send you to king Echetus, who killsevery one that comes near him. He will cut off your nose and ears, anddraw out your entrails for the dogs to eat."
6.  "She came to me one day when I was by myself, as I often was, forthe men used to go with their barbed hooks, all over the island in thehope of catching a fish or two to save them from the pangs ofhunger. 'Stranger,' said she, 'it seems to me that you like starvingin this way- at any rate it does not greatly trouble you, for youstick here day after day, without even trying to get away thoughyour men are dying by inches.'

计划指导

1.  "And what, Telemachus, has led you to take this long sea voyage toLacedaemon? Are you on public or private business? Tell me all aboutit."
2.  "'Stay here, my brave fellows,' said I, 'all the rest of you,while I go with my ship and exploit these people myself: I want to seeif they are uncivilized savages, or a hospitable and humane race.'
3.  They put on their armour as fast as they could- that is to sayUlysses, his three men, and the six sons of Dolius. Laertes also andDolius did the same- warriors by necessity in spite of their greyhair. When they had all put on their armour, they opened the gateand sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way.
4.  Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacianswere charmed as they heard him.
5.  With these words he moved the heart of Penelope. Then Theoclymenussaid to her:
6.  The swineherd now took up the bow and was for taking it toUlysses, but the suitors clamoured at him from all parts of thecloisters, and one of them said, "You idiot, where are you takingthe bow to? Are you out of your wits? If Apollo and the other godswill grant our prayer, your own boarhounds shall get you into somequiet little place, and worry you to death."

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1.  "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?
2.  With these words he picked up the sword that Agelaus had droppedwhen he was being killed, and which was lying upon the ground. Then hestruck Leiodes on the back of his neck, so that his head fellrolling in the dust while he was yet speaking.
3.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, the sons ofAutolycus went out with their hounds hunting, and Ulysses went too.They climbed the wooded slopes of Parnassus and soon reached itsbreezy upland valleys; but as the sun was beginning to beat upon thefields, fresh-risen from the slow still currents of Oceanus, they cameto a mountain dell. The dogs were in front searching for the tracks ofthe beast they were chasing, and after them came the sons ofAutolycus, among whom was Ulysses, close behind the dogs, and he had along spear in his hand. Here was the lair of a huge boar among somethick brushwood, so dense that the wind and rain could not get throughit, nor could the sun's rays pierce it, and the ground underneathlay thick with fallen leaves. The boar heard the noise of the men'sfeet, and the hounds baying on every side as the huntsmen came up tohim, so rushed from his lair, raised the bristles on his neck, andstood at bay with fire flashing from his eyes. Ulysses was the firstto raise his spear and try to drive it into the brute, but the boarwas too quick for him, and charged him sideways, ripping him above theknee with a gash that tore deep though it did not reach the bone. Asfor the boar, Ulysses hit him on the right shoulder, and the pointof the spear went right through him, so that he fell groaning in thedust until the life went out of him. The sons of Autolycus busiedthemselves with the carcass of the boar, and bound Ulysses' wound;then, after saying a spell to stop the bleeding, they went home asfast as they could. But when Autolycus and his sons had thoroughlyhealed Ulysses, they made him some splendid presents, and sent himback to Ithaca with much mutual good will. When he got back, hisfather and mother were rejoiced to see him, and asked him all aboutit, and how he had hurt himself to get the scar; so he told them howthe boar had ripped him when he was out hunting with Autolycus and hissons on Mount Parnassus.
4.  She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.
5.   "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'
6.  "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'

应用

1.  There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having puton their armour they closed the door behind them and went back to taketheir places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the four men stood in thecloister, fierce and full of fury; nevertheless, those who were in thebody of the court were still both brave and many. Then Jove's daughterMinerva came up to them, having assumed the voice and form ofMentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her and said, "Mentor, lend meyour help, and forget not your old comrade, nor the many good turns hehas done you. Besides, you are my age-mate."
2.  Then the queen went back to her room upstairs, and her maids broughtthe presents after her. Meanwhile the suitors took to singing anddancing, and stayed till evening came. They danced and sang till itgrew dark; they then brought in three braziers to give light, andpiled them up with chopped firewood very and dry, and they lit torchesfrom them, which the maids held up turn and turn about. Then Ulyssessaid:
3.  Presently the sun set and it became dark, whereon the pair retiredinto the inner part of the cave and went to bed.
4、  "Phemius," she cried, "you know many another feat of gods andheroes, such as poets love to celebrate. Sing the suitors some oneof these, and let them drink their wine in silence, but cease this sadtale, for it breaks my sorrowful heart, and reminds me of my losthusband whom I mourn ever without ceasing, and whose name was greatover all Hellas and middle Argos."
5、  This was his story, but Ulysses went on eating and drinkingravenously without a word, brooding his revenge. When he had eatenenough and was satisfied, the swineherd took the bowl from which heusually drank, filled it with wine, and gave it to Ulysses, who waspleased, and said as he took it in his hands, "My friend, who was thismaster of yours that bought you and paid for you, so rich and sopowerful as you tell me? You say he perished in the cause of KingAgamemnon; tell me who he was, in case I may have met with such aperson. Jove and the other gods know, but I may be able to give younews of him, for I have travelled much."

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网友评论(Dm2xmMqY84167))

  • 刘斯朗 08-09

      Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."

  • 王海啸 08-09

      So Eumaeus went up to him and said, "Stranger, Telemachus sendsyou this, and says you are to go the round of the suitors begging, forbeggars must not be shamefaced."

  • 赵兰婷 08-09

       "'And I will tell you of all the wicked witchcraft that Circe willtry to practise upon you. She will mix a mess for you to drink, andshe will drug the meal with which she makes it, but she will not beable to charm you, for the virtue of the herb that I shall give youwill prevent her spells from working. I will tell you all about it.When Circe strikes you with her wand, draw your sword and springupon her as though you were goings to kill her. She will then befrightened and will desire you to go to bed with her; on this you mustnot point blank refuse her, for you want her to set your companionsfree, and to take good care also of yourself, but you make her swearsolemnly by all the blessed that she will plot no further mischiefagainst you, or else when she has got you naked she will unman you andmake you fit for nothing.'

  • 雷维善 08-09

      "But the cruel wretch said, 'Then I will eat all Noman's comradesbefore Noman himself, and will keep Noman for the last. This is thepresent that I will make him.'

  • 帕拉米韦 08-08

    {  To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible,well-disposed person. There is no accounting for luck; Jove givesprosperity to rich and poor just as he chooses, so you must takewhat he has seen fit to send you, and make the best of it. Now,however, that you have come to this our country, you shall not wantfor clothes nor for anything else that a foreigner in distress mayreasonably look for. I will show you the way to the town, and willtell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I amdaughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested."

  • 王子江 08-07

      "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."}

  • 郝思远 08-07

      "Do not wake her yet," answered Ulysses, "but tell the women whohave misconducted themselves to come to me."

  • 久德普尔 08-07

      Immediately afterwards Ulysses came inside, looking like a poormiserable old beggar, leaning on his staff and with his clothes all inrags. He sat down upon the threshold of ash-wood just inside the doorsleading from the outer to the inner court, and against abearing-post of cypress-wood which the carpenter had skillfullyplaned, and had made to join truly with rule and line. Telemachus tooka whole loaf from the bread-basket, with as much meat as he could holdin his two hands, and said to Eumaeus, "Take this to the stranger, andtell him to go the round of the suitors, and beg from them; a beggarmust not be shamefaced."

  • 邢捕头 08-06

       Aegyptius, a man bent double with age, and of infinite experience,the first to speak His son Antiphus had gone with Ulysses to Ilius,land of noble steeds, but the savage Cyclops had killed him whenthey were all shut up in the cave, and had cooked his last dinnerfor him, He had three sons left, of whom two still worked on theirfather's land, while the third, Eurynomus, was one of the suitors;nevertheless their father could not get over the loss of Antiphus, andwas still weeping for him when he began his speech.

  • 龚伟芳 08-04

    {  "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."

  • 林希妤 08-04

      Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.

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