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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘东生 大小:eaKl8Hht52530KB 下载:jaOCYBgU55363次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:dbCadCpc89454条
日期:2020-08-06 22:19:54
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  With these words he picked up the sword that Agelaus had droppedwhen he was being killed, and which was lying upon the ground. Then hestruck Leiodes on the back of his neck, so that his head fellrolling in the dust while he was yet speaking.
2.  "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'
3.  With this he got up and made a bed for Ulysses by throwing somegoatskins and sheepskins on the ground in front of the fire. HereUlysses lay down, and Eumaeus covered him over with a great heavycloak that he kept for a change in case of extraordinarily badweather.
4.  THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.
5.  "The ship ran before a fresh North wind till we had reached thesea that lies between Crete and Libya; there, however, Jove counselledtheir destruction, for as soon as we were well out from Crete andcould see nothing but sea and sky, he raised a black cloud over ourship and the sea grew dark beneath it. Then Jove let fly with histhunderbolts and the ship went round and round and was filled withfire and brimstone as the lightning struck it. The men fell all intothe sea; they were carried about in the water round the ship lookinglike so many sea-gulls, but the god presently deprived them of allchance of getting home again. I was all dismayed; Jove, however,sent the ship's mast within my reach, which saved my life, for I clungto it, and drifted before the fury of the gale. Nine days did Idrift but in the darkness of the tenth night a great wave bore me onto the Thesprotian coast. There Pheidon king of the Thesprotiansentertained me hospitably without charging me anything at all forhis son found me when I was nearly dead with cold and fatigue, whereonhe raised me by the hand, took me to his father's house and gave meclothes to wear.
6.  "'When your crew have taken you past these Sirens, I cannot give youcoherent directions as to which of two courses you are to take; I willlay the two alternatives before you, and you must consider them foryourself. On the one hand there are some overhanging rocks againstwhich the deep blue waves of Amphitrite beat with terrific fury; theblessed gods call these rocks the Wanderers. Here not even a birdmay pass, no, not even the timid doves that bring ambrosia to FatherJove, but the sheer rock always carries off one of them, and FatherJove has to send another to make up their number; no ship that everyet came to these rocks has got away again, but the waves andwhirlwinds of fire are freighted with wreckage and with the bodiesof dead men. The only vessel that ever sailed and got through, was thefamous Argo on her way from the house of Aetes, and she too would havegone against these great rocks, only that Juno piloted her past themfor the love she bore to Jason.

计划指导

1.  And in like manner Eumaeus prayed that Ulysses might return home.
2.  As he spoke he lashed his horses and they started off at fullspeed through the town towards the open country. They swayed theyoke upon their necks and travelled the whole day long till the sunset and darkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae,where Diocles lived who was son of Ortilochus, the son of Alpheus.There they passed the night and were treated hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and their places in the chariot. They drove out through theinner gateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court. ThenPisistratus lashed his horses on and they flew forward nothingloath; ere long they came to Pylos, and then Telemachus said:
3.  The bard inspired of heaven took up the story at the point wheresome of the Argives set fire to their tents and sailed away whileothers, hidden within the horse, were waiting with Ulysses in theTrojan place of assembly. For the Trojans themselves had drawn thehorse into their fortress, and it stood there while they sat incouncil round it, and were in three minds as to what they should do.Some were for breaking it up then and there; others would have itdragged to the top of the rock on which the fortress stood, and thenthrown down the precipice; while yet others were for letting it remainas an offering and propitiation for the gods. And this was how theysettled it in the end, for the city was doomed when it took in thathorse, within which were all the bravest of the Argives waiting tobring death and destruction on the Trojans. Anon he sang how thesons of the Achaeans issued from the horse, and sacked the town,breaking out from their ambuscade. He sang how they over ran thecity hither and thither and ravaged it, and how Ulysses went raginglike Mars along with Menelaus to the house of Deiphobus. It wasthere that the fight raged most furiously, nevertheless by Minerva'shelp he was victorious.
4.  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
5.  Ulysses answered, "Take heart and do not trouble yourself aboutthat, but let us go into the house hard by your garden. I have alreadytold Telemachus, Philoetius, and Eumaeus to go on there and get dinnerready as soon as possible."
6.  She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."

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1.  Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."
2.  "'Be sure, therefore,' continued Agamemnon, 'and not be too friendlyeven with your own wife. Do not tell her all that you know perfectlywell yourself. Tell her a part only, and keep your own counsel aboutthe rest. Not that your wife, Ulysses, is likely to murder you, forPenelope is a very admirable woman, and has an excellent nature. Weleft her a young bride with an infant at her breast when we set outfor Troy. This child no doubt is now grown up happily to man's estate,and he and his father will have a joyful meeting and embrace oneanother as it is right they should do, whereas my wicked wife didnot even allow me the happiness of looking upon my son, but killedme ere I could do so. Furthermore I say- and lay my saying to yourheart- do not tell people when you are bringing your ship to Ithaca,but steal a march upon them, for after all this there is no trustingwomen. But now tell me, and tell me true, can you give me any newsof my son Orestes? Is he in Orchomenus, or at Pylos, or is he atSparta with Menelaus- for I presume that he is still living.'
3.  But Theoclymenus said, "Eurymachus, you need not send any one withme. I have eyes, ears, and a pair of feet of my own, to say nothing ofan understanding mind. I will take these out of the house with me, forI see mischief overhanging you, from which not one of you men whoare insulting people and plotting ill deeds in the house of Ulysseswill be able to escape."
4.  Laertes answered, "Would, by Father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo,that I were the man I was when I ruled among the Cephallenians, andtook Nericum, that strong fortress on the foreland. If I were stillwhat I then was and had been in our house yesterday with my armour on,I should have been able to stand by you and help you against thesuitors. I should have killed a great many of them, and you would haverejoiced to see it."
5.   Menelaus was thinking what would be the most proper answer for himto make, but Helen was too quick for him and said, "I will read thismatter as heaven has put it in my heart, and as I doubt not that itwill come to pass. The eagle came from the mountain where it wasbred and has its nest, and in like manner Ulysses, after havingtravelled far and suffered much, will return to take his revenge- ifindeed he is not back already and hatching mischief for the suitors."
6.  "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.

应用

1.  "But Polyphemus shouted to them from inside the cave, 'Noman iskilling me by fraud! Noman is killing me by force!'
2.  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."
3.  "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."
4、  "As we two sat weeping and talking thus sadly with one another theghost of Achilles came up to us with Patroclus, Antilochus, and Ajaxwho was the finest and goodliest man of all the Danaans after theson of Peleus. The fleet descendant of Aeacus knew me and spokepiteously, saying, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, what deed of daringwill you undertake next, that you venture down to the house of Hadesamong us silly dead, who are but the ghosts of them that can labour nomore?'
5、  "By this time my deep sleep had left me, and I turned back to theship and to the sea shore. As I drew near I began to smell hot roastmeat, so I groaned out a prayer to the immortal gods. 'Father Jove,' Iexclaimed, 'and all you other gods who live in everlasting bliss,you have done me a cruel mischief by the sleep into which you havesent me; see what fine work these men of mine have been making in myabsence.'

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  • 薛建雄 08-05

      "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'

  • 崔小粟 08-05

      "Father, let me bring you a shield, two spears, and a brass helmetfor your temples. I will arm myself as well, and will bring otherarmour for the swineherd and the stockman, for we had better bearmed."

  • 窦靖童 08-05

       To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible,well-disposed person. There is no accounting for luck; Jove givesprosperity to rich and poor just as he chooses, so you must takewhat he has seen fit to send you, and make the best of it. Now,however, that you have come to this our country, you shall not wantfor clothes nor for anything else that a foreigner in distress mayreasonably look for. I will show you the way to the town, and willtell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I amdaughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested."

  • 王喆 08-05

      Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."

  • 贝淡宁 08-04

    {  "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."

  • 袁淼 08-03

      "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:}

  • 郝洛钒 08-03

      Penelope, who was sleeping sweetly at the gates of dreamland,answered, "Sister, why have you come here? You do not come very often,but I suppose that is because you live such a long way off. Am I,then, to leave off crying and refrain from all the sad thoughts thattorture me? I, who have lost my brave and lion-hearted husband, whohad every good quality under heaven, and whose name was great over allHellas and middle Argos; and now my darling son has gone off onboard of a ship- a foolish fellow who has never been used toroughing it, nor to going about among gatherings of men. I am evenmore anxious about him than about my husband; I am all in a tremblewhen I think of him, lest something should happen to him, eitherfrom the people among whom he has gone, or by sea, for he has manyenemies who are plotting against him, and are bent on killing himbefore he can return home."

  • 普列夫内利耶夫 08-03

      Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."

  • 吕作武 08-02

       "In the third watch of the night when the stars had shifted theirplaces, Jove raised a great gale of wind that flew a hurricane so thatland and sea were covered with thick clouds, and night sprang forthout of the heavens. When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn,appeared, we brought the ship to land and drew her into a cave whereinthe sea-nymphs hold their courts and dances, and I called the mentogether in council.

  • 李谷建 07-31

    {  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:

  • 李小宝 07-31

      MEANWHILE Ulysses and the swineherd had lit a fire in the hut andwere were getting breakfast ready at daybreak for they had sent themen out with the pigs. When Telemachus came up, the dogs did not bark,but fawned upon him, so Ulysses, hearing the sound of feet andnoticing that the dogs did not bark, said to Eumaeus:

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