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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:曹裕江 大小:TVzLYaAF29592KB 下载:TIyoyYbr96970次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Z89hweoz24979条
日期:2020-08-03 15:08:28
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孙宪忠

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "But I rushed at her with my sword drawn as though I would kill her,whereon she fell with a loud scream, clasped my knees, and spokepiteously, saying, 'Who and whence are you? from what place and peoplehave you come? How can it be that my drugs have no power to charm you?Never yet was any man able to stand so much as a taste of the herb Igave you; you must be spell-proof; surely you can be none other thanthe bold hero Ulysses, who Mercury always said would come here someday with his ship while on his way home form Troy; so be it then;sheathe your sword and let us go to bed, that we may make friendsand learn to trust each other.'
2.  'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."
3.  "I will tell you truly," answered Nestor, "and indeed you haveyourself divined how it all happened. If Menelaus when he got backfrom Troy had found Aegisthus still alive in his house, there wouldhave been no barrow heaped up for him, not even when he was dead,but he would have been thrown outside the city to dogs and vultures,and not a woman would have mourned him, for he had done a deed ofgreat wickedness; but we were over there, fighting hard at Troy, andAegisthus who was taking his ease quietly in the heart of Argos,cajoled Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra with incessant flattery.
4.  "We waited the whole morning and made the best of it, watching theseals come up in hundreds to bask upon the sea shore, till at noon theold man of the sea came up too, and when he had found his fat seals hewent over them and counted them. We were among the first he counted,and he never suspected any guile, but laid himself down to sleep assoon as he had done counting. Then we rushed upon him with a shout andseized him; on which he began at once with his old tricks, and changedhimself first into a lion with a great mane; then all of a sudden hebecame a dragon, a leopard, a wild boar; the next moment he wasrunning water, and then again directly he was a tree, but we stuckto him and never lost hold, till at last the cunning old creaturebecame distressed, and said, Which of the gods was it, Son ofAtreus, that hatched this plot with you for snaring me and seizingme against my will? What do you want?'
5.  Telemachus gave him no heed, but sat silently watching his father,expecting every moment that he would begin his attack upon thesuitors.
6.  As she spoke Minerva touched him with her wand and covered himwith wrinkles, took away all his yellow hair, and withered the fleshover his whole body; she bleared his eyes, which were naturally veryfine ones; she changed his clothes and threw an old rag of a wrapabout him, and a tunic, tattered, filthy, and begrimed with smoke; shealso gave him an undressed deer skin as an outer garment, andfurnished him with a staff and a wallet all in holes, with a twistedthong for him to sling it over his shoulder.

计划指导

1.  On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.
2.  "And what, Telemachus, has led you to take this long sea voyage toLacedaemon? Are you on public or private business? Tell me all aboutit."
3.  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.
4.  On this Antinous began to abuse the swineherd. "You precious idiot,"he cried, "what have you brought this man to town for? Have we nottramps and beggars enough already to pester us as we sit at meat? Doyou think it a small thing that such people gather here to wasteyour master's property and must you needs bring this man as well?"
5.  "'Is there no way,' said I, 'of escaping Charybdis, and at thesame time keeping Scylla off when she is trying to harm my men?'
6.  MINERVA now put it in Penelope's mind to make the suitors trytheir skill with the bow and with the iron axes, in contest amongthemselves, as a means of bringing about their destruction. She wentupstairs and got the store room key, which was made of bronze andhad a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the storeroom at the end of the house, where her husband's treasures of gold,bronze, and wrought iron were kept, and where was also his bow, andthe quiver full of deadly arrows that had been given him by a friendwhom he had met in Lacedaemon- Iphitus the son of Eurytus. The twofell in with one another in Messene at the house of Ortilochus,where Ulysses was staying in order to recover a debt that was owingfrom the whole people; for the Messenians had carried off threehundred sheep from Ithaca, and had sailed away with them and withtheir shepherds. In quest of these Ulysses took a long journey whilestill quite young, for his father and the other chieftains sent him ona mission to recover them. Iphitus had gone there also to try andget back twelve brood mares that he had lost, and the mule foalsthat were running with them. These mares were the death of him inthe end, for when he went to the house of Jove's son, mighty Hercules,who performed such prodigies of valour, Hercules to his shame killedhim, though he was his guest, for he feared not heaven's vengeance,nor yet respected his own table which he had set before Iphitus, butkilled him in spite of everything, and kept the mares himself. Itwas when claiming these that Iphitus met Ulysses, and gave him the bowwhich mighty Eurytus had been used to carry, and which on his deathhad been left by him to his son. Ulysses gave him in return a swordand a spear, and this was the beginning of a fast friendship, althoughthey never visited at one another's houses, for Jove's son Herculeskilled Iphitus ere they could do so. This bow, then, given him byIphitus, had not been taken with him by Ulysses when he sailed forTroy; he had used it so long as he had been at home, but had left itbehind as having been a keepsake from a valued friend.

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1.  Eurynome brought the seat at once and set a fleece upon it, and assoon as Ulysses had sat down Penelope began by saying, "Stranger, Ishall first ask you who and whence are you? Tell me of your town andparents."
2.  "Heaven and the immortal gods," he exclaimed, "forbid that youshould leave my house to go on board of a ship. Do you think I am sopoor and short of clothes, or that I have so few cloaks and as to beunable to find comfortable beds both for myself and for my guests? Letme tell you I have store both of rugs and cloaks, and shall not permitthe son of my old friend Ulysses to camp down on the deck of a ship-not while I live- nor yet will my sons after me, but they will keepopen house as have done."
3.  Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."
4.  "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."
5.   "This may not be, Agelaus," answered Melanthius, "the mouth of thenarrow passage is dangerously near the entrance to the outer court.One brave man could prevent any number from getting in. But I knowwhat I will do, I will bring you arms from the store room, for I amsure it is there that Ulysses and his son have put them."
6.  So here Ulysses stood for a while and looked about him, but whenhe had looked long enough he crossed the threshold and went within theprecincts of the house. There he found all the chief people amongthe Phaecians making their drink-offerings to Mercury, which theyalways did the last thing before going away for the night. He wentstraight through the court, still hidden by the cloak of darkness inwhich Minerva had enveloped him, till he reached Arete and KingAlcinous; then he laid his hands upon the knees of the queen, and atthat moment the miraculous darkness fell away from him and he becamevisible. Every one was speechless with surprise at seeing a man there,but Ulysses began at once with his petition.

应用

1.  "Alcinous," said he, "it is not creditable to you that a strangershould be seen sitting among the ashes of your hearth; every one iswaiting to hear what you are about to say; tell him, then, to rise andtake a seat on a stool inlaid with silver, and bid your servants mixsome wine and water that we may make a drink-offering to Jove the lordof thunder, who takes all well-disposed suppliants under hisprotection; and let the housekeeper give him some supper, ofwhatever there may be in the house."
2.  They all held their peace until Amphinomus rose to speak. He was theson of Nisus, who was son to king Aretias, and he was foremost amongall the suitors from the wheat-growing and well grassed island ofDulichium; his conversation, moreover, was more agreeable toPenelope than that of any of the other for he was a man of goodnatural disposition. "My friends," said he, speaking to them plainlyand in all honestly, "I am not in favour of killing Telemachus. Itis a heinous thing to kill one who is of noble blood. Let us firsttake counsel of the gods, and if the oracles of Jove advise it, I willboth help to kill him myself, and will urge everyone else to do so;but if they dissuade us, I would have you hold your hands."
3.  The others applauded what Antinous had said, and each one sent hisservant to bring his present. Antinous's man returned with a large andlovely dress most exquisitely embroidered. It had twelve beautifullymade brooch pins of pure gold with which to fasten it. Eurymachusimmediately brought her a magnificent chain of gold and amber beadsthat gleamed like sunlight. Eurydamas's two men returned with someearrings fashioned into three brilliant pendants which glistenedmost beautifully; while king Pisander son of Polyctor gave her anecklace of the rarest workmanship, and every one else brought her abeautiful present of some kind.
4、  Then he went downstairs again, leaving Penelope in an agony ofgrief. There were plenty of seats in the house, but she. had noheart for sitting on any one of them; she could only fling herselfon the floor of her own room and cry; whereon all the maids in thehouse, both old and young, gathered round her and began to cry too,till at last in a transport of sorrow she exclaimed,
5、  On this Telemachus strode off through the yards, brooding hisrevenge upon the When he reached home he stood his spear against abearing-post of the cloister, crossed the stone floor of thecloister itself, and went inside.

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  • 蔡学儒 08-02

      She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.

  • 李涯 08-02

      "So be it, old friend," answered Telemachus, "but I am come nowbecause I want to see you, and to learn whether my mother is stillat her old home or whether some one else has married her, so thatthe bed of Ulysses is without bedding and covered with cobwebs."

  • 彼得·詹姆斯 08-02

       "Take heart, and do not trouble yourself about that," rejoinedMinerva, "let us rather set about stowing your things at once in thecave, where they will be quite safe. Let us see how we can best manageit all."

  • 袁代福 08-02

      BOOK IV.

  • 查尔顿 08-01

    {  "On this the ghost of Teiresias went back to the house of Hades, forhis prophecyings had now been spoken, but I sat still where I wasuntil my mother came up and tasted the blood. Then she knew me at onceand spoke fondly to me, saying, 'My son, how did you come down to thisabode of darkness while you are still alive? It is a hard thing forthe living to see these places, for between us and them there aregreat and terrible waters, and there is Oceanus, which no man cancross on foot, but he must have a good ship to take him. Are you allthis time trying to find your way home from Troy, and have you neveryet got back to Ithaca nor seen your wife in your own house?'

  • 阮某 07-31

      "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."}

  • 摩洛哥塔弗拉尔特 07-31

      His father shed tears and answered, "Sir, you have indeed come tothe country that you have named, but it is fallen into the hands ofwicked people. All this wealth of presents has been given to nopurpose. If you could have found your friend here alive in Ithaca,he would have entertained you hospitably and would have requiredyour presents amply when you left him- as would have been only rightconsidering what you have already given him. But tell me, and tellme true, how many years is it since you entertained this guest- myunhappy son, as ever was? Alas! He has perished far from his owncountry; the fishes of the sea have eaten him, or he has fallen a preyto the birds and wild beasts of some continent. Neither his mother,nor I his father, who were his parents, could throw our arms about himand wrap him in his shroud, nor could his excellent and richly doweredwife Penelope bewail her husband as was natural upon his death bed,and close his eyes according to the offices due to the departed. Butnow, tell me truly for I want to know. Who and whence are you- tell meof your town and parents? Where is the ship lying that has brought youand your men to Ithaca? Or were you a passenger on some other man'sship, and those who brought you here have gone on their way and leftyou?"

  • 唐新亮 07-31

      "'Of these two rocks the one reaches heaven and its peak is lostin a dark cloud. This never leaves it, so that the top is neverclear not even in summer and early autumn. No man though he had twentyhands and twenty feet could get a foothold on it and climb it, forit runs sheer up, as smooth as though it had been polished. In themiddle of it there is a large cavern, looking West and turnedtowards Erebus; you must take your ship this way, but the cave is sohigh up that not even the stoutest archer could send an arrow into it.Inside it Scylla sits and yelps with a voice that you might take to bethat of a young hound, but in truth she is a dreadful monster and noone- not even a god- could face her without being terror-struck. Shehas twelve mis-shapen feet, and six necks of the most prodigiouslength; and at the end of each neck she has a frightful head withthree rows of teeth in each, all set very close together, so that theywould crunch any one to death in a moment, and she sits deep withinher shady cell thrusting out her heads and peering all round the rock,fishing for dolphins or dogfish or any larger monster that she cancatch, of the thousands with which Amphitrite teems. No ship everyet got past her without losing some men, for she shoots out all herheads at once, and carries off a man in each mouth.

  • 李国民 07-30

       When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Ulysses puton his shirt and cloak, while the goddess wore a dress of a lightgossamer fabric, very fine and graceful, with a beautiful goldengirdle about her waist and a veil to cover her head. She at once setherself to think how she could speed Ulysses on his way. So she gavehim a great bronze axe that suited his hands; it was sharpened on bothsides, and had a beautiful olive-wood handle fitted firmly on to it.She also gave him a sharp adze, and then led the way to the far end ofthe island where the largest trees grew- alder, poplar and pine,that reached the sky- very dry and well seasoned, so as to saillight for him in the water. Then, when she had shown him where thebest trees grew, Calypso went home, leaving him to cut them, whichhe soon finished doing. He cut down twenty trees in all and adzed themsmooth, squaring them by rule in good workmanlike fashion. MeanwhileCalypso came back with some augers, so he bored holes with them andfitted the timbers together with bolts and rivets. He made the raft asbroad as a skilled shipwright makes the beam of a large vessel, and hefiled a deck on top of the ribs, and ran a gunwale all round it. Healso made a mast with a yard arm, and a rudder to steer with. Hefenced the raft all round with wicker hurdles as a protectionagainst the waves, and then he threw on a quantity of wood. By andby Calypso brought him some linen to make the sails, and he made thesetoo, excellently, making them fast with braces and sheets. Last ofall, with the help of levers, he drew the raft down into the water.

  • 米歇尔奥巴马 07-28

    {  "So she swore at once as I had told her, and when she hadcompleted her oath then I went to bed with her.

  • 张林栋 07-28

      "See now, how men lay blame upon us gods for what is after allnothing but their own folly. Look at Aegisthus; he must needs makelove to Agamemnon's wife unrighteously and then kill Agamemnon, thoughhe knew it would be the death of him; for I sent Mercury to warn himnot to do either of these things, inasmuch as Orestes would be sure totake his revenge when he grew up and wanted to return home. Mercurytold him this in all good will but he would not listen, and now he haspaid for everything in full."

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