0 莆田棋牌迷游戏-APP安装下载命运待这些人不公,但他们却选择笑着面对

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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:周原泽 大小:16DBnUzM74918KB 下载:osJmlrt417778次
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日期:2020-08-12 12:48:34
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Faire Daughter (quoth he) whether wander you at such an unseasonablehoure, and all alone in a place so desolate? The Damosell weeping,replied; that she had lost her company in the Forrest, and enquiredhow neere shee was to Alagna. Daughter (answered the old man) thisis not the way to Alagna, for it is above six leagues hence. Then sheedesired to know, how farre off she was from such houses, where shemight have any reasonable lodging? There are none so neere, said theold man, that day light will give you leave to reach. May it pleaseyou then good Father (replied Angelina) seeing I cannot travalle anywhether else; for Gods sake, to et me remaine heere with you thisnight. Daughter answered the good old man, we can gladly give youentertainement here, for this night, in such poore manner as yousee: but let mee tell you withall, that up and downe these woods (aswell by night as day) walke companies of all conditions, and ratherenemies then friends, who do us many greevous displeasures and harmes.Now if by misfortune, you being here, any such people should come, andseeing you so lovely faire, as indeed you are, offer you any shameor injurie: Alas you see, it lies not in our power to lend you anyhelp or succour. I thought it good (therefore) to acquaint youheerewith, because if any such mischance do happen, you should notafterward complaine of us.
2.  MAKE SALE OF THEIR HONESTY FOR COYNE. A WARNING ALSO FOR MEN,
3.  She, on the morrow morning, pretending to her waiting woman, thatshe was scarsly well, and therefore would not be diseased the mostpart of that day; commanded them to leave her alone in her Chamber,and not to returne untill she called for them, locking the doore herselfe for better security. Then opened she the doore of the cave,and going downe the staires, found there her amorous friend Guiscardo,whom she saluting with a chaste and modest kisse; causing him toascend up the stayres with her into her Chamber. This long desired,and now obtained meeting, caused the two deerely affected Lovers, inkinde discourse of amorous argument (without incivill or rudedemeanor) to spend there the most part of that day, to their heartsjoy and mutuall contentment. And having concluded on their oftenmeeting there, in this cunning and concealed sort; Guiscardo wentdowne into the cave againe, the Princesse making the doore fastafter him, and then went forth among her Women. So in the nightseason, Guiscardo ascended up againe by his Ladder of cords, andcovering the loopehole with brambles and bushes, returned (unseeneof any) to his owne lodging: the cave being afterward guilty oftheir often meeting there in this manner.
4.  The Queene, knowing him to be a man full of mirth and matter,began to consider very advisedly, that he would not have mooved thisrequest, but onely to the end, that if the company grew wearied by anyof the Tales re-counted, hee would shut up the dayes disport with somemirthfull accident. Wherefore willingly, and with consent of all therest he had his suite granted. So, arising all, they walked to aChristall river, descending downe a little hill into a valley,graciously shaded with goodly Trees; where washing both their handsand feete, much pretty pleasure passed among them; till supper timedrawing neere, made them returne home to the Palace. When supper wasended, and bookes and instruments being laide before them, theQueene commanded a dance, and that Madam Aemilia, assisted by MadamLauretta and Dioneus, should sing a sweet ditty. At which command,Lauretta undertooke the dance, and led it, Aemilia singing this songensuing.
5.  CHECKING THE ARROGANT PRIDE OF VAINE-HEADED WOMEN
6.  When the Father had given this cruell sentence, both against hisowne Daughter, and her young Sonne, the servant readier to do evill,then any good, went to the place where his Daughter was kept. Poorecondemned Pedro, (as you have heard) was led whipt to the Gibbet,and passing (as it pleased the Captaines Officers to guide him) by afaire Inne: at the same time were lodged there three chiefe persons ofArminia, whom the King of the Countrey had sent to Rome, asAmbassadours to the Popes Holinesse, to negociate about an importantbusinesse neerely concerning the King and State. Reposing there forsome few dayes, as being much wearied with their journey., andhighly honoured by the Gentlemen of Trapani, especially SigniorAmarigo; these Ambassadours standing in their Chamber window, heardthe wofull lamentations of Pedro in his passage by.

计划指导

1.  The base-minded Knight, coveting to have the Horse, and yet not topart with any money, sent for the Magnifico, desiring to buy his fayreGelding of him, because he hoped to have him of free gift. TheMagnifico hearing this request, was very joyfull, and thus answered;Sir, if you would give me all the wealth which you possesse in thisworld, I wil not sell you my horse, rather I wil bestow him on youas a Gentlemans gift: but yet upon this condition, that before youhave him delivered, I may with your license, and in your presencespeake a few words to your vertuous Ladie, and so farre off indistance from you, as I may not be heard by any, but onely herselfe. Signior Francesco, wholly conducted by his base avariciousdesire, and meaning to make a scorne at the Magnifico, made answer,that he was well contented to let him speak with her when he would;and leaving him in the great Hall of the house, went to his wivesChamber, and told her how easily he might enjoy the horse,commanding her forthwith to come and heare what he could say to her,only she should abstaine, and not returne him any answer. The Ladywith a modest blush, much condemned this folly in him, that hiscovetousnes should serve as a cloake to cover any unfitting speecheswhich her chaste eares could never endure to heare. Neverthelessebeing to obey her husbands will, she promised to do it, and followedhim down into the Hall, to heare what the Magnifico would say.Againe he there confirmed the bargaine made with her husband, andsitting downe by her in a corner of the Hall, farre enough off fromany ones hearing, taking her curteously by the hand, thus he spake.
2.  Peronella hid a yong man her friend and Lover, under a great brewingFat, upon the sodaine returning home of her Husband; who told her,that hee had solde the saide Fat and brought him that bought it, tocary it away. Peronella replyed, that shee had formerly solde itunto another, who was now underneath it, to see whether it werewhole and sound, or no. Whereupon, he being come forth from underit; she caused her Husband to make it neate and cleane, and so thelast buyer carried it away.
3.  Finding his doore to be fast lockt, and he having knockt softlieonce or twice, he spake in this manner to himselfe. Fortune I thankethee, for albeit thou hast made mee poore, yet thou hast bestowed abetter blessing on me, in matching me with so good, honest, and lovinga Wife. Behold, though I went early out of my house, her selfe hathrisen in the cold to shut the doore, to prevent the entrance oftheeves, or any other that might offend us. Peronella having heardwhat her husband sayde, and knowing the manner of his knocke, saidfearfully to Striguario. Alas deare friend, what shall wee doe? I amlittle lesse then a dead Woman: For, Lazaro my Husband is come backeagain, and I know not what to do or say. He never returned in thisorder before now, doubtlesse, hee saw when you entred the doore; andfor the safety of your honour and mine: creepe under this brewing Fat,till I have opened the doore, to know the reason of his so soonereturning.
4.  Whereon it came to passe, that this earnest love encreasing in hermore and more, and one melancholly conceit taking hold on another: thefaire Maide, when she could beare the burden of her griefe nolonger; fell into a languishing sickenesse, consuming away daily (byevident appearance) even as the Snow melteth by the warme beames ofthe Sunne.
5.  Every one in this honest and gracious assembly, most highlycommended the Novell re-counted by the Queene: but especially Dioneus,who remained to finish that dayes pleasure with his owne Discourse,and after many praises of the former tale were past, thus he began.Faire Ladies, part of the Queenes Novell hath made an alteration of myminde, from that which I intended to proceede next withall, andtherfore I will report another. I cannot forget the unmanlyindiscretion of Bernardo, but much more the base arrogance ofAmbroginolo, how justly deserved shame fell upon him, as well it mayhappen to all other, that are so vile in their owne opinions, as heapparantly approved himselfe to be. For, as men wander abroad in theworld, according to their occasions in diversity of Countries andobservations of the peoples behaviour; so are their humours asvariously transported. And if they finde women wantonly disposedabroade, the like judgement they give of their Wives at home; as ifthey had never knowne their birth and breeding, or made proofe oftheir loyall carriage towards them. Wherefore, the Tale that I purposeto relate, will likewise condemne all the like kind of men, but moreespecially such as thinke themselves endued with more strength thenNature meant to bestow on them, foolishly beleeving, that they cancover their owne defects by fabulous demonstrations, and thinking tofashion other of their owne complexions, that are meerely strangers tosuch grosse follies.Know then, that there lived in Pisa (some hundred yeeres beforeTuscany and Liguria embraced the Christian faith) a judge betterstored with wisedome and ingenuity, then corporall abilities of thebody, named Signior Ricciardo di Cinzica. He being more then halfeperswaded, that hee could content a woman with such satisfaction ashee daily bestowed on his studies, being a widdower, and extraordinarywealthy, laboured with no meane paines, to enjoy a faire and youthfullwife in marriage: both which qualities hee should much rather haveavoyded, if he could have ministred as good counsell to himselfe, ashe did to others, resorting to him for advice. Upon this his amorousand diligent inquisition, it came so to passe, that a worthyGentlewoman, called Bertolomea, one of the fairest and choisest yongmaids in Pisa, whose youth did hardly agree with his age; but muck wasthe motive of this mariage, and no expectation of mutuall contentment.The Judge being married, and the Bride brought solemnly home to hishouse, we need make no question of brave cheare and banquetting,well furnished by their friends on either side: other matters were nowhammering in the judges head, for thogh he could please all hisClients with counsel, yet now such a suit was commenced againsthimselfe, and in Beauties Court of continuall requests, that the Judgefailing in plea for his own defence, was often nonsuited by lack ofanswer; yet he wanted not good wines, drugs, and all sorts ofrestoratives to comfort the heart, and encrease good blood: but allavailed not.
6.  This done, Rustico's desire was more than ever inflamed at the sightof her beauty, and the resurrection of the flesh came to pass.Seeing this, and not knowing what it meant, Alibech asked: "Rustico,what is it thou hast that thrusts itself out in front, and that I havenot?" "My daughter," quoth Rustico, "it is that same Devil of whom Ihave been telling thee. Dost thou mark him? Behold, he gives me suchsore trouble that I can hardly bear it."

推荐功能

1.  HUSBANDES, EITHER IN RESPECT OF THEIR LOVE, OR FOR THE PREVENTION
2.  Madame Usimbalda, Lady Abbesse of a Monastery of Nuns inLombardie, arising hastily in the night time without a Candle, to takeone of her Daughter Nunnes in bed with a yong Gentleman, whereof shewas enviously accused, by certaine of her other Sisters: The Abbesseher selfe (being at the same time in bed with a Priest) imagining tohave put on her head her plaited vayle, put on the Priests breeches.Which when the poore Nunne perceyved; by causing the Abbesse to seeher owne error, she got her selfe to be absolved, and had the freerliberty afterward, to be more familiar with her frend, then formerlyshe had bin.
3.  Upon this conclusion, Albert departed, leaving Lisetta in nomeane pride of imagination, that God Cupid should be enamoured ofher beauty; and therefore she thought each houre a yeare, till shemight see him in the mortall shape of Friar Albert. And now was hisbraine wonderfully busied, to visite her in more then common or humanemanner; and therefore he made him a sute (close to his body) ofwhite Taffata, all poudred over with Starres, and spangles of Gold,a Bow and Quiver of Arrowes, with wings also fastened to his backebehinde him, and all cunningly covered with his Friars habit, whichmust be the sole meanes of his safe passage.
4.  Madam, this foot travell may bee offensive to you, and were you sowell pleased as my selfe, I would ease your journey behinde mee onmy Gelding, even so as you shall command me: and beside, wil shortenyour wearinesse with a Tale worth the hearing. Courteous Sir(replyed the Lady) I embrace your kinde offer with such acceptation,that I pray you to performe it; for therein you shall doe me anespeciall favour. The Knight, whose Sword (perhappes) was asunsuteable to his side, as his wit out of fashion for any readiediscourse, having the Lady mounted behinde him rode on with a gentlepace, and (according to his promise) began to tell a Tale, whichindeede (of it selfe) deserved attention, because it was a knowneand commendable History, but yet delivered so abruptly, with idlerepetitions of some particulars three or foure severall times,mistaking one thing for another, and wandering erroneously from theessentiall subject, seeming neere an end, and then beginning againe:that a poore Tale could not possibly be more mangled, or worsetortured in telling, then this was; for the persons therein concerned,were so abusively nicke-named, their actions and speeches somonstrously mishapen, that nothing could appeare to be more ugly.
5.   It came to passe, that Andreana sleeping in her bed, dreamed, thatshee met with Gabriello in the Garden, where they both embracinglovingly together, she seemed to see a thing blacke and terrible,which sodainely issued forth of his body, but the shape therof shecould not comprehend. It rudely seized upon Gabriello, and in despightof her utmost strength, with incredible force snatched him out ofher armes, and sinking with him into the earth, they never after didsee one another. Whereupon, overcome with extremity of greefe andsorrow, presently she awaked, being then not a little joyfull, thatshe found no such matter as she feared, yet continued very doubtfullof her dreame. In regard whereof, Gabriello being desirous to visiteher the night following: she laboured very diligently to hinder hiscomming to her; yet knowing his loyall affection toward her, andfearing least he should grow suspitious of some other matter, shewelcommed him into the Garden, where gathering both white andDamaske Roses (according to the nature of the season) at length,they sate downe by a very goodly Fountaine, which stoode in themiddest of the Garden.
6.  Then the Soldane strictly commaunded, that on some high andeminent place of the Citie, Ambroginolo should be bound and impaled ona stake, having his naked body nointed all over with hony, and neverto bee taken off, untill (of it selfe) it fell in peeces, which,according to the sentence, was presently performed. Next, he gaveexpresse charge, that all his mony and goods should be given toGenevra, which valued above ten thousand double Duckets. Forthwith asolemne Feast was prepared, wherein much honor was done to Bernardo,being the husband of Genevra: and to her, as to a most worthy woman,and matchlesse wife, he gave in costly jewels, as also vessels of goldand silver plate, so much as did amount to above ten thousand doubleDuckets more.

应用

1.  Thy Sacred fires,
2.  In that most blissefull state,
3.  THEMSELVES, DO THROW EVILL ASPERSIONS ON ALL THEIR SEXE
4、  The Marquesse of Montferrat was a worthy and valiant Knight, whobeing Captaine Generall for the Church, the necessary service requiredhis company on the Seas, in a goodly Army of the Christians againstthe Turkes. Upon a day, in the Court of King Philip, sirnamed theone eyed King (who likewise made preparation in France, for a royallassistance to that expedition) as many speeches were delivered,concerning the valour and manhoode of this Marquesse: it fortuned,that a Knight was then present, who knew him very familiarly, and hegave an addition to the former commendation, that the whole worldcontained not a more equall couple in marriage, then the Marquesse andhis Lady. For, as among all knights, the Marquesse could hardly beparaleld for Armes and Honour; even so his wife, in comparison ofall other Ladies, was scarcely matchable for beauty and vertue.Which words were so weighty in the apprehension of King Philip, thatsodainly (having as yet never seen her) he began to affect her veryearnestly, concluding to embarke himselfe at Gennes or Genoua, thereto set forward on the intended voyage, and journying thither byland, hee would shape some honest excuse to see the Lady Marquesse,whose Lord being then from home, opinion perswaded him over fondly,that he should easily obtaine the issue of his amorous desire.
5、  No imbarment remained, but remembrance of the Marquesse, and thatbeing summoned to her more advised consideration, her youth and beautystood up as conscious accusers, for blemishing her honour and fairerepute, with lewd and luxurious life, far unfit for a Lady of herdegree, and well worthy of generall condemnation. What should Ifurther say? upon a short conference with her Chamber-maide,repentance for sinne past, and solemne promise of a constantconversion, thus shee delivered her minde to Rinaldo.

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网友评论(15ogLitZ25731))

  • 穆克森 08-11

      I found my selfe the further plunged in.

  • 柏斯 08-11

      Now Madame, let me further give you to understand, that I am areligious person, and a pilgrime, and therefore am well acquaintedwith all the courses of their dealing; if therefore I speakesomewhat more amply of them, and for your good, it can not be sounseeming for mee to doe it, as it would appeare ugly in another. Inwhich respect, I will speake the more freely to you, to the ende, thatyou may take better knowledge of them, then (as it seemeth) hithertoyou have done. In former passed times such as professed Religion, werelearned and most holy persons; but our religious professours nowadayes, and such as covet to bee so esteemed; have no matter at all ofReligion in them, but onely the outward shew and habite. Which yetis no true badge of Religion neither, because it was ordained byreligious institutions, that their garments should bee made ofarrow, plaine, and coursest spun cloth, to make a publikemanifestation to the world, that (in meere devotion, and religiousdisposition) by wrapping their bodies in such base clothing, theycondemned and despised all temporall occasions. But now adaies theymake them large, deepe, glistering, and of the finest cloth or stuffesto bee gotten, reducing those habites to so proude and pontificall aforme, that they walke Peacock-like, rustling, and strouting with themin the Churches; yea, and in open publike places, as if they wereordinary secular persons, to have their pride more notoriouslyobserved. And as the Angler bestoweth his best cunning, with oneline and baite to catch many fishes at one strike; even so do thesecounterfeited habit-mongers, by their dissembling and craftydealing, beguile many credulous widdowes: simple women, yea, and menof weake capacity, to credit whatsoever they doe or say, and hereinthey doe most of all exercise themselves.

  • 高华俊 08-11

       To cheare my long dismay:

  • 陈立波 08-11

      Let me (quoth he) admit the case, that none of these surmises areintended, but her Kinsman (by and in this manner devised) must bringme into her house: I am not therefore perswaded, that he or they docovet, to have the body of Scannadio, either to carry it thither, orpresent it to her, but rather do aime at some other end. May not Iconjecture, that my close murthering is purposed, and this wayacted, as on him that (in his life time) had offended them? The Maidhath straitly charged me, that whatsoever is said or done unto me, Iam not to speake a word. What if they pul out mine eies, teare outmy teeth, cut off my hands, or do me any other mischiefe: Where am Ithen? Shall all these extremities barre me of speaking? On the otherside, if I speake, then I shall be knowne, and so much the sooner(perhaps) be abused. But admit that I sustaine no injurie at all, asbeing guilty of no transgression: yet (perchance) I shall not becarried to her house, but to some other baser place, and afterward sheshall reprove me, that I did not accomplish what shee commanded, andso all my labour is utterly lost.

  • 高领霞 08-10

    {  Pyrrhus, who had diligently observed the whole cariage of thisbusinesse, saide to himselfe. My Ladie hath begun well, and proceedingon with no worse successe, will (no doubt) bring her love to anhappy conclusion. As for the Lady her selfe, she having thus kildthe Hawke, it was no long while after, but being in the Chamber withher husband, and they conversing familiarly together; she began tojest with him, and hee in the like manner with her, tickling andtoying each the other, till at the length she played with his beard,and now she found occasion aptly serving, to effect the second taskeimposed by Pyrrhus. So, taking fast hold on a small tuft of his beard,she gave a sodaine snatch, and plucked it away quite from his chin.Whereat Nicostratus beeing angerly moved, she (to appease hisdistaste) pleasantly thus spake. How now my Lord? Why do you lookeso frowningly? What? Are you angry for a few loose haires of yourbeard? How then should I take it, when you plucke mee by the haireof my head, and yet I am not a jot discontented, because I know you doit but in jesting manner? These friendly speeches cut off allfurther contention, and she kepte charily the tuft of er Husbandsbeard, which (the verie selfe-same day) shee sent to Pyrrhus herhearts chosen friend.

  • 景龙 08-09

      Madam, by such revelations as have beene shewne to me, I know fora certainety, that Theobaldo is not dead, but living, in health, andin good estate; if he had the fruition of your grace and favour.Take heede what you say Sir (quoth the Gentlewoman) for I saw himlye slain before my doore, his bodie having received many wounds,which I folded in mine armes, and washed his face with my brinishteares; whereby (perhaps) the scandall arose, that flew abroad to mydisgrace. Beleeve me Madam, replyed the Pilgrim, say what you will,I dare assure you that Theobaldo is living, and if you dare makepromise, concerning what hath bin formerly requested, and keepe itinviolably, I make no doubt, but you your selfe shall shortly see him.I promise it (quoth she) and binde my selfe thereto by a sacredoath, to keepe it faithfully: for never could any thing happen toyeeld me the like contentment, as to see my Father free from danger,and Theobaldo living.}

  • 董治良 08-09

      When the Magnifico in the person of the Lady, had spoken thus,then he returned her this answer. Most vertuous Lady, my spirits areso transported with extraordinary joy, for this your gracious andwelcome answer, that my sences faile me, and all my faculties quiteforsake me, that I cannot give you such thankes as I would. And if Icould speak equally to my desire, yet the season suites not therewith,neither were it convenient that I should be so troublesome to you. Letme therefore humbly beseech you, that the desire I have toaccomplish your will (which wordes availe not to expresse) may remainein your kinde consideration. And as you have commanded me, so will Inot faile to performe it accordingly, and in more thankfull manner,then (as yet) I am able to let you know. Now there resteth nothingelse to do, but under the protection of your gracious pardon, I togive over speech, and you to attend your woorthy Husband.

  • 迈克·麦考尔 08-09

      Puccio instantly replyed. Now trust me Sir, there is no greatdifficultie in this labour, neither doth it require anyextraordinary length of time: but it may very easily be followed andperformed, and (by your friendly favor, in helping to direct theFurnace and Table, according as you imagine most convenient) on Sundayat night next, I will begin my taske.The place which Puccio had chosen, for his hopefull attaining tothe Philosophers Stone, was close to the Chamber where his daughterlay having no other separation or division, but an old ruinoustottring wall. So that, when the Scholler was playing his prize,Puccio heard an unwonted noise in the house, which he had neverobserved before, neither knew the wall to have any such motion:wherefore, not daring to stirre from his standing, least all should bemarrd in the very beginning, he called to his daughter, demanding,what busle labour she was about? The widdow, being much addicted tofrumping according as questions were demanded of her, and (perhaps)forgetting who spake to her, pleasantly replied: Whoop Sir, whereare we now? Are the Spirits of Alchimy walking in the house, that wecannot lye quietly in our beds?

  • 胡精沛 08-08

       With movables and all kinde of furnishment, befitting a house ofsuch outward apparance, hee caused it to be plentifully stored onelyto receive, entertaine, and honor all Gentlemen or other Travailerswhatsoever, as had occasion to passe that way, being not unprovidedalso of such a number of servants, as might continuallie giveattendance on all commers and goers. Two and fifty severall gates,standing alway wide open, and over each of them in great goldencarracters was written, Welcome, welcome, and gave free admission toall commers whatsoever.

  • 陈亮 08-06

    {  ERROURS IN OTHERS, WHICH REMAINE IN THEMSELVES, COMMONLY ARE

  • 焦—化 08-06

      MEANES ARE TO BE USED, FOR THEIR REDUCING TO GOODNESSE

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