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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:卢洪洲 大小:wpYM6EAn52393KB 下载:xEVgDH7K97913次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:y365qN6292686条
日期:2020-08-04 17:34:06
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陈思

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."
2.  They threw their spears as he bade them, but Minerva made them allof no effect. One hit the door post; another went against the door;the pointed shaft of another struck the wall; and as soon as theyhad avoided all the spears of the suitors Ulysses said to his own men,"My friends, I should say we too had better let drive into themiddle of them, or they will crown all the harm they have done us byus outright."
3.  While he was thus in two minds a wave caught him and took him withsuch force against the rocks that he would have been smashed andtorn to pieces if Minerva had not shown him what to do. He caught holdof the rock with both hands and clung to it groaning with pain tillthe wave retired, so he was saved that time; but presently the wavecame on again and carried him back with it far into the sea-tearinghis hands as the suckers of a polypus are torn when some one plucks itfrom its bed, and the stones come up along with it even so did therocks tear the skin from his strong hands, and then the wave drewhim deep down under the water.
4.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said; they went tothe store room, which they entered before Melanthius saw them, forhe was busy searching for arms in the innermost part of the room, sothe two took their stand on either side of the door and waited. By andby Melanthius came out with a helmet in one hand, and an olddry-rotted shield in the other, which had been borne by Laertes whenhe was young, but which had been long since thrown aside, and thestraps had become unsewn; on this the two seized him, dragged him backby the hair, and threw him struggling to the ground. They bent hishands and feet well behind his back, and bound them tight with apainful bond as Ulysses had told them; then they fastened a nooseabout his body and strung him up from a high pillar till he wasclose up to the rafters, and over him did you then vaunt, Oswineherd Eumaeus, saying, "Melanthius, you will pass the night on asoft bed as you deserve. You will know very well when morning comesfrom the streams of Oceanus, and it is time for you to be driving inyour goats for the suitors to feast on."
5.  Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."
6.  "Stranger," said he, "how suddenly you have changed from what youwere a moment or two ago. You are dressed differently and yourcolour is not the same. Are you some one or other of the gods thatlive in heaven? If so, be propitious to me till I can make you duesacrifice and offerings of wrought gold. Have mercy upon me."

计划指导

1.  Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."
2.  BOOK XX.
3.  "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun wefeasted our fill on meat and drink, but when the sun went down andit came on dark, we camped upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I bade my men on board andloose the hawsers. Then they took their places and smote the greysea with their oars; so we sailed on with sorrow in our hearts, butglad to have escaped death though we had lost our comrades.
4.  The suitors then returned to their singing and dancing until theevening; but when night fell upon their pleasuring they went home tobed each in his own abode. Telemachus's room was high up in a towerthat looked on to the outer court; hither, then, he hied, brooding andfull of thought. A good old woman, Euryclea, daughter of Ops, theson of Pisenor, went before him with a couple of blazing torches.Laertes had bought her with his own money when she was quite young; hegave the worth of twenty oxen for her, and shewed as much respect toher in his household as he did to his own wedded wife, but he didnot take her to his bed for he feared his wife's resentment. She itwas who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him betterthan any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed himwhen he was a baby. He opened the door of his bed room and sat downupon the bed; as he took off his shirt he gave it to the good oldwoman, who folded it tidily up, and hung it for him over a peg byhis bed side, after which she went out, pulled the door to by a silvercatch, and drew the bolt home by means of the strap. But Telemachus ashe lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night throughof his intended voyage of the counsel that Minerva had given him.
5.  "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."
6.  "I stayed with Calypso seven years straight on end, and wateredthe good clothes she gave me with my tears during the whole time;but at last when the eighth year came round she bade me depart ofher own free will, either because Jove had told her she must, orbecause she had changed her mind. She sent me from her island on araft, which she provisioned with abundance of bread and wine. Moreovershe gave me good stout clothing, and sent me a wind that blew bothwarm and fair. Days seven and ten did I sail over the sea, and onthe eighteenth I caught sight of the first outlines of the mountainsupon your coast- and glad indeed was I to set eyes upon them.Nevertheless there was still much trouble in store for me, for at thispoint Neptune would let me go no further, and raised a great stormagainst me; the sea was so terribly high that I could no longer keepto my raft, which went to pieces under the fury of the gale, and I hadto swim for it, till wind and current brought me to your shores.

推荐功能

1.  "And I saw Sisyphus at his endless task raising his prodigious stonewith both his hands. With hands and feet he' tried to roll it up tothe top of the hill, but always, just before he could roll it overon to the other side, its weight would be too much for him, and thepitiless stone would come thundering down again on to the plain.Then he would begin trying to push it up hill again, and the sweat ranoff him and the steam rose after him.
2.  "As spoke he drove the ram outside, but when we were a little wayout from the cave and yards, I first got from under the ram's belly,and then freed my comrades; as for the sheep, which were very fat,by constantly heading them in the right direction we managed todrive them down to the ship. The crew rejoiced greatly at seeing thoseof us who had escaped death, but wept for the others whom theCyclops had killed. However, I made signs to them by nodding andfrowning that they were to hush their crying, and told them to get allthe sheep on board at once and put out to sea; so they went aboard,took their places, and smote the grey sea with their oars. Then,when I had got as far out as my voice would reach, I began to jeerat the Cyclops.
3.  "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captives. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war-cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with soldiers horse and foot, and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them; as for myself, they gave me to a friend who met them,to take to Cyprus, Dmetor by name, son of Iasus, who was a great manin Cyprus. Thence I am come hither in a state of great misery."
4.  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
5.   "I was broken hearted when I heard that I must go back all that longand terrible voyage to Egypt; nevertheless, I answered, 'I will doall, old man, that you have laid upon me; but now tell me, and tell metrue, whether all the Achaeans whom Nestor and I left behind us whenwe set sail from Troy have got home safely, or whether any one of themcame to a bad end either on board his own ship or among his friendswhen the days of his fighting were done.'
6.  "Then they went away, and I laughed inwardly at the success of myclever stratagem, but the Cyclops, groaning and in an agony of pain,felt about with his hands till he found the stone and took it from thedoor; then he sat in the doorway and stretched his hands in front ofit to catch anyone going out with the sheep, for he thought I might befoolish enough to attempt this.

应用

1.  "With this I left the ship and went up inland. When I got throughthe charmed grove, and was near the great house of the enchantressCirce, I met Mercury with his golden wand, disguised as a young man inthe hey-day of his youth and beauty with the down just coming upon hisface. He came up to me and took my hand within his own, saying, 'Mypoor unhappy man, whither are you going over this mountain top,alone and without knowing the way? Your men are shut up in Circe'spigsties, like so many wild boars in their lairs. You surely do notfancy that you can set them free? I can tell you that you will neverget back and will have to stay there with the rest of them. Butnever mind, I will protect you and get you out of your difficulty.Take this herb, which is one of great virtue, and keep it about youwhen you go to Circe's house, it will be a talisman to you againstevery kind of mischief.
2.  "When I had got the men together I said to them, 'You think youare about to start home again, but Circe has explained to me thatinstead of this, we have got to go to the house of Hades andProserpine to consult the ghost of the Theban prophet Teiresias.'
3.  On this the day broke, but Ulysses heard the sound of her weeping,and it puzzled him, for it seemed as though she already knew him andwas by his side. Then he gathered up the cloak and the fleeces onwhich he had lain, and set them on a seat in the cloister, but he tookthe bullock's hide out into the open. He lifted up his hands toheaven, and prayed, saying "Father Jove, since you have seen fit tobring me over land and sea to my own home after all the afflictionsyou have laid upon me, give me a sign out of the mouth of some oneor other of those who are now waking within the house, and let me haveanother sign of some kind from outside."
4、  BOOK XVIII.
5、  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.

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  • 吉某玉 08-03

      Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said. First theywashed and put their shirts on, while the women got ready. ThenPhemius took his lyre and set them all longing for sweet song andstately dance. The house re-echoed with the sound of men and womendancing, and the people outside said, "I suppose the queen has beengetting married at last. She ought to be ashamed of herself for notcontinuing to protect her husband's property until he comes home."

  • 李军边 08-03

      "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

  • 刘宝杰 08-03

       "Then they went away, and I laughed inwardly at the success of myclever stratagem, but the Cyclops, groaning and in an agony of pain,felt about with his hands till he found the stone and took it from thedoor; then he sat in the doorway and stretched his hands in front ofit to catch anyone going out with the sheep, for he thought I might befoolish enough to attempt this.

  • 柏庄 08-03

      Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."

  • 公格尔 08-02

    {  "Vixen," replied Ulysses, scowling at her, "I will go and tellTelemachus what you have been saying, and he will have you torn limbfrom limb."

  • 孙永 08-01

      BOOK XI.}

  • 叶匡时 08-01

      Many a plausible tale did Ulysses further tell her, and Penelopewept as she listened, for her heart was melted. As the snow wastesupon the mountain tops when the winds from South East and West havebreathed upon it and thawed it till the rivers run bank full withwater, even so did her cheeks overflow with tears for the husbandwho was all the time sitting by her side. Ulysses felt for her and wasfor her, but he kept his eyes as hard as or iron without lettingthem so much as quiver, so cunningly did he restrain his tears.Then, when she had relieved herself by weeping, she turned to himagain and said: "Now, stranger, I shall put you to the test and seewhether or no you really did entertain my husband and his men, asyou say you did. Tell me, then, how he was dressed, what kind of a manhe was to look at, and so also with his companions."

  • 约翰·罗杰斯 08-01

      On this she led the way, while Telemachus followed in her steps.When they got to the ship they found the crew waiting by the waterside, and Telemachus said, "Now my men, help me to get the stores onboard; they are all put together in the cloister, and my mother doesnot know anything about it, nor any of the maid servants except one."

  • 吴思澜 07-31

       "Antinous, insolent and wicked schemer, they say you are the bestspeaker and counsellor of any man your own age in Ithaca, but youare nothing of the kind. Madman, why should you try to compass thedeath of Telemachus, and take no heed of suppliants, whose witnessis Jove himself? It is not right for you to plot thus against oneanother. Do you not remember how your father fled to this house infear of the people, who were enraged against him for having gonewith some Taphian pirates and plundered the Thesprotians who were atpeace with us? They wanted to tear him in pieces and eat up everythinghe had, but Ulysses stayed their hands although they wereinfuriated, and now you devour his property without paying for it, andbreak my heart by his wooing his wife and trying to kill his son.Leave off doing so, and stop the others also."

  • 洪煜 07-29

    {  On this she led the way, while Telemachus followed in her steps.When they got to the ship they found the crew waiting by the waterside, and Telemachus said, "Now my men, help me to get the stores onboard; they are all put together in the cloister, and my mother doesnot know anything about it, nor any of the maid servants except one."

  • 俞可平 07-29

      "'Let me tell you,' said I, 'whichever of the goddesses you mayhappen to be, that I am not staying here of my own accord, but musthave offended the gods that live in heaven. Tell me, therefore, forthe gods know everything. which of the immortals it is that ishindering me in this way, and tell me also how I may sail the sea soas to reach my home.'

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