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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:拉什卡尔加 大小:cBxQ96GT92974KB 下载:1kXHRMK772876次
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日期:2020-08-04 19:45:48
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  MAGNANIMOUS MINDE OF A FAMOUS LADY
2.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, WHAT HARD AND NARROW SHIFTS AND DISTRESSES,
3.  It came to passe, that a young Sicillian wench (very beautifull, butat commaund of whosoever would, and for small hire) pass then by,and (without his percieving) seeing such store of gold in his purse;presently she said to her selfe: why should not all those crownes bemine, when the foole that owes them, can keepe them no closer? Andso she went on. With this young wanton there was (at the same time) anolde woman (as commonly such stuffe is alwayes so attended) seeming tobe a Sicillian also, who so soone as shee saw Andrea, knew him, andleaving her youthfull commodity, ranne to him, and embraced him verykindly. Which when the younger Lasse perceived, without proceeding anyfurther, she stayed to see what would ensue thereon. Andrea conferringwith the olde Bawde, and knowing her (but not for any such creature)declared himselfe very affable to her; she making him promise, thatshee would come and drinke with him at his lodging. So breaking offfurther speeches for that time, shee returned to her youngCammerado; and Andrea went about buying his horses, still cheapninggood store, but did not buy any all that morning.
4.  In all the fairest shewes that she did make.
5.  The Novell recited by Pamphilus, was highly pleasing to the company,and much commended by the Ladies: and after it had beene diligentlyobserved among them, the Queene commanded Madam Neiphila (who wasseated neerest to Pamphilus) that, in relating another of hers, sheshould follow on in the pastime thus begun. She being no lessegracious in countenance, then merrily disposed; made answere, thatshee would obey her charge, and began in this manner.
6.  It chanced within some few months after, that the kinred of Gisippuscame to see him, and (before Titus) avised him to marriage, and with ayong Gentlewoman of singular beauty, derived from a most noble housein Athens, and she named Sophronia, aged about fifteen years. Thismariage drawing neere, Gisippus on a day, intreated Titus to walkalong with him thither, because (as yet) he had not seene her.Commingto the house, and she sitting in the midst betweene them, Titusmaking himselfe a considerator of beauty, and especially on hisfriends behalfe; began to observe her very judicially, and everypart of her seemed so pleasing in his eie, that giving them al aprivat praise, yet answerable to their due deserving; he becam soenflamed with affection to her, as never any lover could bee moreviolentlie surprized, so sodainly doth beauty beguile our best senses.

计划指导

1.  But frailtie in our feminine sex is too much prevalent, and makes uswander from vertuous courses, when we are wel onward in the way tothem. Madam Beatrix, whatsoever passed betweene her and Anichino, Iknow not, but, either to continue this new begunne league forfurther time, or, to be revenged on her husbands implicity, inover-rashlie giving credit to so smooth a ly; this was her advise tohim. Anichino, quoth she, Take a good Cudgell in thy hand, then gointo the Garden so farre as the Pine; and there, as if formerly thouhadst solicited mee unto this secret meeting, only but by way ofapproving my honestie: in my name, revile thy master so bitterly asthou canst, bestowing manie sound blowes on him with thy cudgel; yeturge the shame stil (as it were) to mee, and never leave him, til thouhast beaten him out of the garden, to teach him keepe his bedanother time Such an apt Scholler as Anichino was in this kind,needs no tutoring, but a word is enough to a ready Wit. To theGarden goes he, with a good willow cudgell in his hand, and commingneere to the Pine-tree, there he found Egano disguised like to hisLady, who arising from the place where he sate, went with chearefullgesture to welcome him; but Anichino (in rough and stearne manner)thus spake unto him. Wicked shamelesse, and most immodest Woman, Artthou come, according to thine unchaste and lascivious promise?Couldest thou so easily credite, (though I tempted thee, to trie thevertue of thy continencie) I would offer such a damnable wrong to myworthy Master, that so deerely loves me, and reposeth his especiallconfidence in me? Thou art much deceived in me, and shalt finde,that I hate to be false to him.
2.  Now trust me kinde friend Bruno, replyed the Physitian, I likeyour advice exceeding well. For, if hee be a man, that takethdelight to converse with men of skill and judgement, and you have madethe way for his knowing me: he wil him thirst, and long to followafter mee, to understand the incredible eloquence flowing from me, andthe rare composition of my Musicall Ditties, out of which he maylearne no meane wisedome. When the matter was thus agreed onbetweene them, Bruno departed thence, and acquainted Buffalmaco witheverie circumstance: which made him thinke everie day a yeare,untill he might in the fooling of Mayster Doctoar, according to hisowne fancie. Who beeing also as desirous on the other side, to makeone in the Corsicane Voyage; could take no manner of rest either byday or night, till he was linked in friendship with Buffalmaco,which very quickely after hee compassed.
3.  Continuing thus in talke of divers things, winning way, andbeguiling the time, still waiting when their purpose should sort toeffect: it fortuned, that the Theeves seeing they were come neere to aTowne, called Chasteau Guillaume, by the foord of a River, the houresomewhat late, the place solitarie, and thickely shaded with Trees,they made their assault; and having robd him, left him there on foote,stript into his shirt, saying to him. Goe now and see, whether thySaint Julian will allow thee this night a good lodging, or no, for ourowne we are sufficiently provided; so passing the River, away theyrode. Rinaldoes servant, seeing his Master so sharply assayled, like awicked villaine, would not assist him in any sort: but giving hishorse the spurres, never left gallopping, untill hee came toChasteau Guillaume, where hee entred upon the point of night,providing himselfe of a lodging, but not caring what became of hisMaster.
4.  Chappelet, thou knowest how I am wholly to retreate my selfe fromhence, and having some affaires among the Burgundians, men full ofwickednesse and deceite; I can bethinke my selfe of no meeter a manthen Chappelet, to recover such debts as are due to mee among them.And because it falleth out so well, that thou art not now hinderedby any other businesse; if thou wilt undergoe this office for me, Iwill procure thee favourable Letters from the Court, and give thee areasonable portion in all thou recoverest. Master Chappelet, seeinghimselfe idle, and greedy after worldly goods, considering thatMounsieur Musciatto (who had beene alwayes his best buckler) was nowto depart from thence, without any dreaming on the matter, andconstrained thereto (as it were) by necessity, set downe hisresolution, and answered, that hee would gladly doe it.
5.  The Novell of Madame Neiphila being ended, which proved verypleasing to the Ladies: the Queene commanded Madam Pampinea, thatshe should prepare to take her turne next, whereto willinglyobeying, thus she began. Many and mighty (Gracious Ladies) are theprevailing powers of love, conducting amorous soules into infinitetravels, with inconveniences no way avoidable, and not easily to beforeseene, or prevented. As partly already hath bene observed, bydivers of our former Novels related, and some (no doubt) to ensuehereafter; for one of them (comming now to my memory) I shall acquaintyou withall, in so good tearmes as I can.
6.  If vertues prize, valour and hardiment,

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1.  Gerbino, contrary to the former plighted faith of hisGrand-father, King Gulielmo, fought with a Ship at Sea, belonging tothe King of Thunis, to take away his Daughter, who was then in thesame Ship. Shee being slaine by them that had the possession of her,he likewise slew them; and afterward had his owne head smitten off.
2.  Theodoro falling in love with Violenta, the Daughter to hisMaster, named Amarigo, and she conceiving with child by him; wascondemned to be hanged. As they were leading him to the Gallowes,beating and misusing him all the way: he happened to be knowne ofhis owne Father, whereupon he was released, and afterward enjoyedViolenta in marriage.
3.  WHEREIN OLDE MEN ARE WITTILY REPREHENDED, THAT WILL MATCH
4.  But, after the dayes warmth was more mildely qualified, and everyone had made benefit of their best content: they went (by order sentfrom the Queene) into the Meadow where the Fountaine stood, andbeing set about it, as they used to do in telling their Tales (theargument appointed by the Queene being propounded) the first thathad the charge imposed, was Philostratus, who began in this manner.
5.   Gracious company, there is no defect in this Banquet, or more debarsit of the honour it might else have, but onely the presence ofTheobaldo, who having bin continually in your company, it seemes youare not willing to take knowledge of him, and therefore I meane myselfe to shew him. So, uncasing himselfe out of his Pilgrimes clothes,and standing in his Hose and Doublet, to their no little admiration,they all knew him, yet doubted whether it were he, or no. Which heperceiving, he repeated his brethrens and absent kindreds names, andwhat occurrences hapned betweene them from time to time, beside therelation of his owne passed fortunes, inciting teares in the eyes ofhis brethren, and all else there present, every one hugging andembracing him, yea, many beside, who were no kin at all to him.Hermelina onely excepted: which when Aldobrandino saw, he said untoher; How now Hermelina? Why doest thou not welcome home Theobaldo,so kindly as the rest have done?
6.  It is my part therefore, to entreat thee, to comfort her longlanguishing desires: but if thou persist in thy harsh opinion, instead of reputing thee a wise and fortunate yong man, I shall confessethee to bee an ignoraunt Asse. What a glorie is it to thee, to beaffected of so faire and worthy a Lady, beyond all men elsewhatsoever? Next to this, tell me, how highly maist thou confessethy self beholding to Fortune, if thou but duly consider, how sheehath elected thee as sole soveraigne of her hopes, which is a crowneof honour to thy youth and a sufficient refuge against all wants andnecessities? Where is any to thy knowledge like thy selfe, that canmake such advantage of his time, as thou maist do, if thou wertwise? Where canst thou find any one to go beyond thee in Armes,Horses, sumptuous garments, and Gold, as will be heaped on thee, ifLydia may be the Lady of thy love? Open then thine understanding to mywords, returne into thine owne souie, and bee wise for thy selfe.

应用

1.  While matters went on in this successefull manner, although he couldnot chuse, but still he remembred his cruell Mistresse, and was verydesperately transported for her love, as coveting (above all thingselse) to see her once more; yet was he of such powerfull constancy, as7 whole yeeres together, he vanquished all those fierce conflicts. Buton a day it chanced he heard a song sung in Cyprus, which hehimselfe had formerly made, in honour of the love he bare to hisMistresse, and what delight he conceived, by being dayly in herpresence; whereby he gathered, that it was impossible for him toforget her, and proceeded on so desirously, as he could not live,except he had a sight of her once more, and therefore determined onhis returne to Florence. Having set all his affaires in due order,accompanied with a servant of his onely, he passed to Ancona, wherewhen he was arrived, he sent his Merchandises to Florence, in nameof the Merchant of Ancona, who was his especiall friend and partner;travayling himselfe alone with his servant, in the habite of aPilgrime, as if he had beene newly returned from Jerusalem.
2.  When these newes were carried to the Abbot, sodainly he brakeforth and saide. What new kinde of needy tricke hath my braine begottethis day? Why do I grow disdainfull against any man whatsoever? I havelong time allowed my meate to be eaten by all commers that didplease to visit me, without exception against any person, Gentleman,Yeoman, poore or rich, Marchant or Minstrill, honest man or knave,never refraining my presence in the Hall, by basely contemning onepoore man. Beleeve me, covetousnesse of one mans meate, doth ill agreewith mine estate and calling. What though he appeareth a wretchedfellow to me? He may be of greater merit then I can imagine, anddeserve more honor then I am able to give him.
3.  From temperate and calme speeches, they fell to frownes and ruderLanguage, which heated their blood in such violent manner, thatforgetting brotherly affection, and all respect of Parents or Friends,they drew forth their Ponyards, stabbing each other so often anddesperately, that before any in the shippe had the power or meanesto part them, both of them being very dangerously wounded, the youngerbrother fell downe dead: the elder being in little better case, byreceiving so many perilous hurts, remained (neverthelesse) living.This unhappy accident displeased the Lady very highly, seeing herselfe thus left alone, without the help or counsell of any bodie;and fearing greatly, least the anger of the two Brethrens Parentsand Friends, should now bee laide to her charge, and thereon followseverity of punishment. But the earnest entreaties of the woundedsurviver, and their arrivall at Smirna soone after, delivered him fromthe danger of death, gave some ease to her sorrow, and there withhim she went on shore.Remaining there with him in a common Inne, while he continued inthe Chirurgians cure, the fame of her singular and much admired beautywas soone spread abroad throughout all the City: and amongst the rest,to the hearing of the Prince of Ionia, who lately before (on veryurgent occasions) was come to Smyrna. This rare rumour, made himdesirous to see her, and after he had seene her, shee seemed farrefairer in his eye, then common report had noised her to be, andsuddenly grew so enamored of her, that she was the onely Idea of hisbest desires. Afterward, understanding in what manner shee was broughtthither, he devised how to make her his own, practising all possiblemeanes to accomplish it: which when the wounded Brothers Parents heardof, they not onely made tender of their willingnesse therein, but alsoimmediately sent her to him: a matter most highly pleasing to thePrince, and likewise to the Lady her selfe; because she thought now tobe freed from no meane perill, which (otherwise) the wounded Merchantsfriends might have inflicted uppon her.
4、  THE FOURTH DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL
5、  It came to passe in the end, that the Lady Abbesse who all thiswhile imagined no such matter, walking all alone in the garden on aday, found Massetto sleeping under an Almond tree, having then verylitle businesse to doe, because he had wrought hard all the nightbefore. She observed him to be an hansome man, young, lusty,well-limbde and proportioned, having a mercifull commisseration of hisdumbenesse and deafenes, being perswaded also in like manner, thatif hee were an Eunuch too, hee deserved a thousand times the more tobe pittied. The season was exceeding hot, and he lay downe socarelesly to sleepe, that somthing was noted wherein shee intendedto be better resolved, almost falling sicke of the other Nunnesdisease. Having awaked him, she commanded him by signes that he shouldfollow her to her chamber, where he was kept close so long, that theNunnes grew offended, because the Gardiner came not to his dailylabour.

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网友评论(F96yeykR28163))

  • 倪鹏飞 08-03

      The Abbot riding on, with newer crotchets in his braine then hehad before the sight of Alessandro, it fortuned, that after diversdayes of travaile, they came to a small Country Village, whichaffoorded little store of Lodging, and yet the Abbot would needeslye there. Alessandro, being well acquainted with the Hoste of thehouse, willed him to provide for the Abbot and his people, and then tolodge him where hee thought it meetest. Now before the Abbotscomming thither, the Harbenger that marshalled all such matters, hadprovided for his Traine in the Village, some in one place, andothers elsewhere, in the best maner that the Towne could yeelde. Butwhen the Abbot had supt, a great part of the night being spent, andevery one else at his rest; Alessandro demaunded of the Hoste, whatprovision he had made for him, and how hee should be lodged thatnight?

  • 喻妙熊 08-03

      The Soldan of Babylon sent one of his Daughters, to be joyned inmarriage with the King of Cholcos, who by divers accidents (in thespace of foure yeeres) happened into the custodie of nine men, andin sundry places. At length, being restored backe to her Father, shewent to the saide King of Cholcos, as a Maid, and as at first shewas intended to be his wife.

  • 玛格丽特 08-03

       Alathiella mistrusting no such trechery intended against her, andliking the Wines pleasing taste extraordinarily, dranke more thenstoode with her precedent modest resolution, and forgetting all herpassed adversities, became very frolicke and merry: so that seeingsome women dance after the manner observed there in Majorica, she alsofell to dauncing according to the Alexandrian custome. Which whenBajazeth beheld, he imagined the victory to be more then halfewonne, and his hearts desire verie neere the obtaining: plying herstill with wine upon wine, and continuing this revelling the most partof the night.

  • 吴艳 08-03

      O Soveraigne Love by thee.

  • 肖艺九 08-02

    {  Thorello having drunke a heartie draught to the Bride, conveyedthe Ring into the Cuppe, before any person could perceive it, andhaving left but small store of Wine in it, covered the Cuppe, and sentit againe to the Bride, who received it very gracioasly, and to honourthe Stranger in his Countries custome, dranke up the rest of the Wine,and espying the Ring, shee tooke it forth undescried by any: Knowingit to be the same Ring which shee gave Signior Thorello at his partingfrom her; she fixed her eyes often on it, and as often on him, whomshe thought to be a stranger, the cheerfull bloud mounting up into hercheeks, and returning againe with remembrance to her heart, that(howsoever thus disguised) he only was her husband.

  • 甘晖 08-01

      Isabella, living in expectation of his returne, and perceiving hisstay to her was so offensive long: made many demands to herBrethren, into what parts they had sent him, that his tarrying wasso quite from all wonted course. Such was her importunate speechesto them, that they taking it very discontentedly, one of them returnedher this frowning answer. What is your meaning Sister, by so manyquestionings after Lorenzo? What urgent affaires have you with him,that makes you so impatient upon his absence? If hereafter you makeany more demands for him, we shall shape you such a reply, as willbe but little to your liking. At these harsh words, Isabella fell intoabundance of teares, where-among she mingled many sighes andgroanes, such as were able to overthrow a farre stronger constitution:so that, being full of feare and dismay, yet no way distrusting herbrethrens cruell deede; she durst not question any more after him.}

  • 章百家 08-01

      Dismounting from his horse, he walked on with Nathan, diverslydiscoursing, untill they came to the Pallace, where one of theservants taking Mithridanes his horse, Nathan rounded the fellow inthe eare, that he should give warning to al. throughout the House, forrevealing to the Gentleman, that he was Nathan; as accordingly itwas performed. No sooner were they within the Pallace, but heconducted Mithridanes into a goodly chamber, wher none (as yet) hadseene him, but such as were appointed to attend on him reverently;yea, and he did himselfe greatly honor him, as being loth to leave hiscompany.

  • 蒲忠 08-01

      THAT TRUELY KNOW HOW TO USE THEM

  • 莎翁 07-31

       Now there remained no more (to preserve the priviledge granted toDioneus uninfringed) but the Queene onely, to declare her Novell.Wherefore, when the discourse of Madam Lauretta was ended, withoutattending any motion to bee made for her next succeeding, with agracious and pleasing disposition, thus she began to speake. Who shalltell any Tale heereafter, to carry any hope or expectation of aliking, having heard the rare and wittie discourse of Madame Lauretta?Beleeve me, it was very advantageable to us all, that she was not thisdayes first beginner, because few or none would have had any courageto follow after her; and therefore the rest yet remaining, are themore to be feared and suspected. Neverthelesse, to avoid the breach oforder, and to claime no priviledge by my place, of not performing whatI ought to do: prove as it may, a Tale you must have, and thus Iproceed.

  • 陈震江 07-29

    {  Upon the day of all Saints, the Count kept a solemne Feastivall, forthe assembly of his Lords, Knights, Ladies, and Gentlewomen: uponwhich Joviall day of generall rejoycing, the Countesse attired inher wonted Pilgrimes weed, repaired thither, entring into the greatHall where the Tables were readily covered for dinner. Preassingthrough the throng of people, with her two children in her armes, spresumed unto the place where the Count sate, and falling on her kneesbefore him, the teares trickling abundantly downe her cheekes, thusshe spake. Worthy Lord, I am thy poore, despised, and unfortunatewife; who, that thou mightst returne home, and not be an exile fromthine owne abiding, have thus long gone begging through the world. Yetnow at length, I hope thou wilt be so honourably-minded, as toperforme thine owne too strict imposed conditions, made to the twoKnights which I sent unto thee, and which (by thy command) I wasenjoyned to do. Behold here in mine armes, not onely one Sonne by theebegotten, but two Twins, and thy Ring beside. High time is it now,if men of honour respect their promises, and after so long and tedioustravell, I should at last be welcommed as thy true wife.

  • 龙沁 07-29

      So soone as the King perceyved, that the Novell reported by MadameEliza was finished: hee turned himselfe to Madame Lauretta, and toldher as his pleasure, that she should now begin the next, whereto sheyeelded in this manner. O Love: What, and how many are thyprevailing forces? How straunge are thy foresights? And howadmirable thine attempts? Where is, or ever was the Philosopher orArtist, that could enstruct the wiles, escapes, preventions, anddemonstrations, which sodainly thou teachest such, as are thy aptand understanding Schollers indeede? Certaine it is, that thedocuments and eruditions of all other whatsoever, are weak, or of noworth, in respect of thine: as hath notably appeared, by theremonstrances already past, and whereto (worthy Ladies) I wil addeanother of a simple woman, who taught her husband such a lesson, asshee never learned of any, but Love himselfe.

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