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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:周平虎 大小:rg9lyDZJ15971KB 下载:aAyHVzPq30501次
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日期:2020-08-07 12:36:10
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus, you ought not to be so immeasurablyastonished at my being really here. There is no other Ulysses who willcome hereafter. Such as I am, it is I, who after long wandering andmuch hardship have got home in the twentieth year to my own country.What you wonder at is the work of the redoubtable goddess Minerva, whodoes with me whatever she will, for she can do what she pleases. Atone moment she makes me like a beggar, and the next I am a young manwith good clothes on my back; it is an easy matter for the gods wholive in heaven to make any man look either rich or poor."
2.  Every one assented, and Ulysses girded his old rags about his loins,thus baring his stalwart thighs, his broad chest and shoulders, andhis mighty arms; but Minerva came up to him and made his limbs evenstronger still. The suitors were beyond measure astonished, and onewould turn towards his neighbour saying, "The stranger has broughtsuch a thigh out of his old rags that there will soon be nothingleft of Irus."
3.  "Father, let me bring you a shield, two spears, and a brass helmetfor your temples. I will arm myself as well, and will bring otherarmour for the swineherd and the stockman, for we had better bearmed."
4.  While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.
5.  "Alas," he cried to himself in his dismay, "what ever will become ofme, and how is it all to end? If I stay here upon the river bedthrough the long watches of the night, I am so exhausted that thebitter cold and damp may make an end of me- for towards sunrisethere will be a keen wind blowing from off the river. If, on the otherhand, I climb the hill side, find shelter in the woods, and sleep insome thicket, I may escape the cold and have a good night's rest,but some savage beast may take advantage of me and devour me."
6.  "I am very much distressed," said Telemachus, "by what you have justtold me. How can I take this stranger into my house? I am as yetyoung, and am not strong enough to hold my own if any man attacksme. My mother cannot make up her mind whether to stay where she is andlook after the house out of respect for public opinion and thememory of her husband, or whether the time is now come for her to takethe best man of those who are wooing her, and the one who will makeher the most advantageous offer; still, as the stranger has come toyour station I will find him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with asword and sandals, and will send him wherever he wants to go. Or ifyou like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send himclothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men;but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are veryinsolent, and are sure to ill-treat him in a way that would greatlygrieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothingagainst numbers, for they will be too strong for him."

计划指导

1.  "But there! It rests with heaven to determine whether he is toreturn, and take his revenge in his own house or no; I would, however,urge you to set about trying to get rid of these suitors at once. Takemy advice, call the Achaean heroes in assembly to-morrow -lay yourcase before them, and call heaven to bear you witness. Bid the suitorstake themselves off, each to his own place, and if your mother'smind is set on marrying again, let her go back to her father, who willfind her a husband and provide her with all the marriage gifts that sodear a daughter may expect. As for yourself, let me prevail upon youto take the best ship you can get, with a crew of twenty men, and goin quest of your father who has so long been missing. Some one maytell you something, or (and people often hear things in this way) someheaven-sent message may direct you. First go to Pylos and askNestor; thence go on to Sparta and visit Menelaus, for he got homelast of all the Achaeans; if you hear that your father is alive and onhis way home, you can put up with the waste these suitors will makefor yet another twelve months. If on the other hand you hear of hisdeath, come home at once, celebrate his funeral rites with all duepomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make your mother marryagain. Then, having done all this, think it well over in your mindhow, by fair means or foul, you may kill these suitors in your ownhouse. You are too old to plead infancy any longer; have you not heardhow people are singing Orestes' praises for having killed his father'smurderer Aegisthus? You are a fine, smart looking fellow; show yourmettle, then, and make yourself a name in story. Now, however, Imust go back to my ship and to my crew, who will be impatient if Ikeep them waiting longer; think the matter over for yourself, andremember what I have said to you."
2.  BOOK XXI.
3.  On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door,with the arrow standing against the tip of the bow. Then he took hisseat again on the seat from which he had risen; and Antinous rebukedhim saying:
4.  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
5.  When she had thus made an end of praying, she handed the cup toTelemachus and he prayed likewise. By and by, when the outer meatswere roasted and had been taken off the spits, the carvers gaveevery man his portion and they all made an excellent dinner. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, Nestor, knight of Gerene,began to speak.
6.  Thus sang the bard, but Ulysses drew his purple mantle over his headand covered his face, for he was ashamed to let the Phaeacians seethat he was weeping. When the bard left off singing he wiped the tearsfrom his eyes, uncovered his face, and, taking his cup, made adrink-offering to the gods; but when the Phaeacians pressedDemodocus to sing further, for they delighted in his lays, thenUlysses again drew his mantle over his head and wept bitterly. Noone noticed his distress except Alcinous, who was sitting near him,and heard the heavy sighs that he was heaving. So he at once said,"Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, we have had enoughnow, both of the feast, and of the minstrelsy that is its dueaccompaniment; let us proceed therefore to the athletic sports, sothat our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as boxers, wrestlers, jumpers,and runners."

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1.  "They called her and she came down, unfastened the door, and badethem enter. They, thinking no evil, followed her, all exceptEurylochus, who suspected mischief and stayed outside. When she hadgot them into her house, she set them upon benches and seats and mixedthem a mess with cheese, honey, meal, and Pramnian but she druggedit with wicked poisons to make them forget their homes, and whenthey had drunk she turned them into pigs by a stroke of her wand,and shut them up in her pigsties. They were like pigs-head, hair,and all, and they grunted just as pigs do; but their senses were thesame as before, and they remembered everything.
2.  "Listen to me you suitors, who persist in abusing the hospitality ofthis house because its owner has been long absent, and without otherpretext than that you want to marry me; this, then, being the prizethat you are contending for, I will bring out the mighty bow ofUlysses, and whomsoever of you shall string it most easily and sendhis arrow through each one of twelve axes, him will I follow andquit this house of my lawful husband, so goodly, and so abounding inwealth. But even so I doubt not that I shall remember it in mydreams."
3.  Then he threw his dirty old wallet, all tattered and torn, overhis shoulder with the cord by which it hung, and went back to sit downupon the threshold; but the suitors went within the cloisters,laughing and saluting him, "May Jove, and all the other gods," saidthey, 'grant you whatever you want for having put an end to theimportunity of this insatiable tramp. We will take him over to themainland presently, to king Echetus, who kills every one that comesnear him."
4.  When Ulysses heard this he put the lid on the chest and made it fastwith a bond that Circe had taught him. He had done so before anupper servant told him to come to the bath and wash himself. He wasvery glad of a warm bath, for he had had no one to wait upon himever since he left the house of Calypso, who as long as he remainedwith her had taken as good care of him as though he had been a god.When the servants had done washing and anointing him with oil, and hadgiven him a clean cloak and shirt, he left the bath room and joinedthe guests who were sitting over their wine. Lovely Nausicaa stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof if the cloister, andadmired him as she saw him pass. "Farewell stranger," said she, "donot forget me when you are safe at home again, for it is to me firstthat you owe a ransom for having saved your life."
5.   "You say truly, my dear father," answered Telemachus, "and you shallsee, if you will, that I am in no mind to disgrace your family."
6.  "She is still at the house," replied Eumaeus, "grieving and breakingher heart, and doing nothing but weep, both night and daycontinually."

应用

1.  He led the way as he spoke, and Minerva followed him. When they werewithin he took her spear and set it in the spear- stand against astrong bearing-post along with the many other spears of his unhappyfather, and he conducted her to a richly decorated seat under which hethrew a cloth of damask. There was a footstool also for her feet,and he set another seat near her for himself, away from the suitors,that she might not be annoyed while eating by their noise andinsolence, and that he might ask her more freely about his father.
2.  Then the other maids in the house rose and lit the fire on thehearth; Telemachus also rose and put on his clothes. He girded hissword about his shoulder, bound his sandals on his comely feet, andtook a doughty spear with a point of sharpened bronze; then he went tothe threshold of the cloister and said to Euryclea, "Nurse, did youmake the stranger comfortable both as regards bed and board, or didyou let him shift for himself?- for my mother, good woman though sheis, has a way of paying great attention to second-rate people, andof neglecting others who are in reality much better men."
3.  While he was thus in two minds Helen came down from her high vaultedand perfumed room, looking as lovely as Diana herself. Adraste broughther a seat, Alcippe a soft woollen rug while Phylo fetched her thesilver work-box which Alcandra wife of Polybus had given her.Polybus lived in Egyptian Thebes, which is the richest city in thewhole world; he gave Menelaus two baths, both of pure silver, twotripods, and ten talents of gold; besides all this, his wife gaveHelen some beautiful presents, to wit, a golden distaff, and asilver work-box that ran on wheels, with a gold band round the topof it. Phylo now placed this by her side, full of fine spun yarn,and a distaff charged with violet coloured wool was laid upon thetop of it. Then Helen took her seat, put her feet upon thefootstool, and began to question her husband.
4、  The king was delighted at this, and exclaimed to the Phaecians"Aldermen and town councillors, our guest seems to be a person ofsingular judgement; let us give him such proof of our hospitality ashe may reasonably expect. There are twelve chief men among you, andcounting myself there are thirteen; contribute, each of you, a cleancloak, a shirt, and a talent of fine gold; let us give him all this ina lump down at once, so that when he gets his supper he may do so witha light heart. As for Euryalus he will have to make a formal apologyand a present too, for he has been rude."
5、  "Do not," replied Vulcan, "ask me to do this; a bad man's bond isbad security; what remedy could I enforce against you if Mars shouldgo away and leave his debts behind him along with his chains?"

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  • 朱珠 08-06

      Pontonous mixed the wine and handed it to every one in turn; theothers each from his own seat made a drink-offering to the blessedgods that live in heaven, but Ulysses rose and placed the double cupin the hands of queen Arete.

  • 刘利鹏 08-06

      "If you really are my son Ulysses," replied Laertes, "and havecome back again, you must give me such manifest proof of your identityas shall convince me."

  • 巴纳比杰克 08-06

       They therefore aimed straight in front of them and threw theirspears. Ulysses killed Demoptolemus, Telemachus Euryades, EumaeusElatus, while the stockman killed Pisander. These all bit the dust,and as the others drew back into a corner Ulysses and his men rushedforward and regained their spears by drawing them from the bodies ofthe dead.

  • 长田路时 08-06

      "There you go," cried he, "and a precious pair you are. See howheaven brings birds of the same feather to one another. Where, pray,master swineherd, are you taking this poor miserable object? Itwould make any one sick to see such a creature at table. A fellow likethis never won a prize for anything in his life, but will go aboutrubbing his shoulders against every man's door post, and begging,not for swords and cauldrons like a man, but only for a few scraps notworth begging for. If you would give him to me for a hand on mystation, he might do to clean out the folds, or bring a bit of sweetfeed to the kids, and he could fatten his thighs as much as he pleasedon whey; but he has taken to bad ways and will not go about any kindof work; he will do nothing but beg victuals all the town over, tofeed his insatiable belly. I say, therefore and it shall surely be- ifhe goes near Ulysses' house he will get his head broken by thestools they will fling at him, till they turn him out."

  • 侯康乙 08-05

    {  On hearing this Telemachus smiled to his father, but so that Eumaeuscould not see him.

  • 王哲付 08-04

      Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."}

  • 王二仁 08-04

      Then Alcinous told Laodamas and Halius to dance alone, for there wasno one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybus hadmade for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw itup towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the groundand caught it with ease before it came down again. When they haddone throwing the ball straight up into the air they began to dance,and at the same time kept on throwing it backwards and forwards to oneanother, while all the young men in the ring applauded and made agreat stamping with their feet. Then Ulysses said:

  • 袁和平 08-04

      "Sir, my father Nestor, when we used to talk about you at home, toldme you were a person of rare and excellent understanding. If, then, itbe possible, do as I would urge you. I am not fond of crying while Iam getting my supper. Morning will come in due course, and in theforenoon I care not how much I cry for those that are dead and gone.This is all we can do for the poor things. We can only shave our headsfor them and wring the tears from our cheeks. I had a brother who diedat Troy; he was by no means the worst man there; you are sure tohave known him- his name was Antilochus; I never set eyes upon himmyself, but they say that he was singularly fleet of foot and in fightvaliant."

  • 常建勇 08-03

       BOOK III.

  • 黄永进 08-01

    {  Ulysses was glad when he found he had a friend among the lookers-on,so he began to speak more pleasantly. "Young men," said he, "come upto that throw if you can, and I will throw another disc as heavy oreven heavier. If anyone wants to have a bout with me let him comeon, for I am exceedingly angry; I will box, wrestle, or run, I donot care what it is, with any man of you all except Laodamas, butnot with him because I am his guest, and one cannot compete with one'sown personal friend. At least I do not think it a prudent or asensible thing for a guest to challenge his host's family at any game,especially when he is in a foreign country. He will cut the groundfrom under his own feet if he does; but I make no exception as regardsany one else, for I want to have the matter out and know which isthe best man. I am a good hand at every kind of athletic sport knownamong mankind. I am an excellent archer. In battle I am always thefirst to bring a man down with my arrow, no matter how many more aretaking aim at him alongside of me. Philoctetes was the only man whocould shoot better than I could when we Achaeans were before Troyand in practice. I far excel every one else in the whole world, ofthose who still eat bread upon the face of the earth, but I should notlike to shoot against the mighty dead, such as Hercules, or Eurytusthe Cechalian-men who could shoot against the gods themselves. This infact was how Eurytus came prematurely by his end, for Apollo was angrywith him and killed him because he challenged him as an archer. Ican throw a dart farther than any one else can shoot an arrow. Runningis the only point in respect of which I am afraid some of thePhaecians might beat me, for I have been brought down very low at sea;my provisions ran short, and therefore I am still weak."

  • 刘伯承 08-01

      So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."

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