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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:王大锤 大小:2hrvpqob11777KB 下载:CmOYXtcZ28665次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:3GZ9cdSH20372条
日期:2020-08-08 12:10:13
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张东明

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "I too," answered Theoclymenus, am an exile, for I have killed a manof my own race. He has many brothers and kinsmen in Argos, and theyhave great power among the Argives. I am flying to escape death attheir hands, and am thus doomed to be a wanderer on the face of theearth. I am your suppliant; take me, therefore, on board your shipthat they may not kill me, for I know they are in pursuit."
2.  Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."
3.  Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.
4.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Poor unhappy stranger, Ihave found the story of your misfortunes extremely interesting, butthat part about Ulysses is not right; and you will never get me tobelieve it. Why should a man like you go about telling lies in thisway? I know all about the return of my master. The gods one and all ofthem detest him, or they would have taken him before Troy, or lethim die with friends around him when the days of his fighting weredone; for then the Achaeans would have built a mound over his ashesand his son would have been heir to his renown, but now the stormwinds have spirited him away we know not whither.
5.  "Thus spoke Proteus, and I was broken hearted as I heard him. Isat down upon the sands and wept; I felt as though I could no longerbear to live nor look upon the light of the sun. Presently, when I hadhad my fill of weeping and writhing upon the ground, the old man ofthe sea said, 'Son of Atreus, do not waste any more time in cryingso bitterly; it can do no manner of good; find your way home as fastas ever you can, for Aegisthus be still alive, and even though Oresteshas beforehand with you in kilting him, you may yet come in for hisfuneral.'
6.  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus rose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to hiscomely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. He at once sent the criers round to callthe people in assembly, so they called them and the people gatheredthereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place ofassembly spear in hand- not alone, for his two hounds went with him.Minerva endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness that allmarvelled at him as he went by, and when he took his place' in hisfather's seat even the oldest councillors made way for him.

计划指导

1.  "I will not refuse you," replied Telemachus, "if you wish to joinus. Come, therefore, and in Ithaca we will treat you hospitablyaccording to what we have."
2.  His son, Theoclymenus, it was who now came up to Telemachus as hewas making drink-offerings and praying in his ship. "Friend'" said he,"now that I find you sacrificing in this place, I beseech you byyour sacrifices themselves, and by the god to whom you make them, Ipray you also by your own head and by those of your followers, tell methe truth and nothing but the truth. Who and whence are you? Tell mealso of your town and parents."
3.  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.
4.  And Ulysses answered, "In good truth, goddess, it seems I shouldhave come to much the same bad end in my own house as Agamemnon did,if you had not given me such timely information. Advise me how I shallbest avenge myself. Stand by my side and put your courage into myheart as on the day when we loosed Troy's fair diadem from her brow.Help me now as you did then, and I will fight three hundred men, ifyou, goddess, will be with me."
5.  The suitors then returned to their singing and dancing until theevening; but when night fell upon their pleasuring they went home tobed each in his own abode. Telemachus's room was high up in a towerthat looked on to the outer court; hither, then, he hied, brooding andfull of thought. A good old woman, Euryclea, daughter of Ops, theson of Pisenor, went before him with a couple of blazing torches.Laertes had bought her with his own money when she was quite young; hegave the worth of twenty oxen for her, and shewed as much respect toher in his household as he did to his own wedded wife, but he didnot take her to his bed for he feared his wife's resentment. She itwas who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him betterthan any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed himwhen he was a baby. He opened the door of his bed room and sat downupon the bed; as he took off his shirt he gave it to the good oldwoman, who folded it tidily up, and hung it for him over a peg byhis bed side, after which she went out, pulled the door to by a silvercatch, and drew the bolt home by means of the strap. But Telemachus ashe lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night throughof his intended voyage of the counsel that Minerva had given him.
6.  Then it vanished through the thong-hole of the door and wasdissipated into thin air; but Penelope rose from her sleep refreshedand comforted, so vivid had been her dream.

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1.  Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."
2.  When they had done praying and sprinkling the barley mealThrasymedes dealt his blow, and brought the heifer down with astroke that cut through the tendons at the base of her neck, whereonthe daughters and daughters-in-law of Nestor, and his venerable wifeEurydice (she was eldest daughter to Clymenus) screamed withdelight. Then they lifted the heifer's head from off the ground, andPisistratus cut her throat. When she had done bleeding and was quitedead, they cut her up. They cut out the thigh bones all in due course,wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set some pieces of rawmeat on the top of them; then Nestor laid them upon the wood fireand poured wine over them, while the young men stood near him withfive-pronged spits in their hands. When the thighs were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest of the meat upsmall, put the pieces on the spits and toasted them over the fire.
3.  "Thus then were they shut up squealing, and Circe threw them someacorns and beech masts such as pigs eat, but Eurylochus hurried backto tell me about the sad fate of our comrades. He was so overcome withdismay that though he tried to speak he could find no words to doso; his eyes filled with tears and he could only sob and sigh, till atlast we forced his story out of him, and he told us what hadhappened to the others.
4.  "Some things, Telemachus," answered Minerva, "will be suggested toyou by your own instinct, and heaven will prompt you further; for I amassured that the gods have been with you from the time of your birthuntil now."
5.   "My dear," answered Penelope, "I have no wish to set myself up,nor to depreciate you; but I am not struck by your appearance, for Ivery well remember what kind of a man you were when you set sailfrom Ithaca. Nevertheless, Euryclea, take his bed outside the bedchamber that he himself built. Bring the bed outside this room, andput bedding upon it with fleeces, good coverlets, and blankets."
6.  BOOK III.

应用

1.  While they were thus busy getting their dinner ready, Rumour wentround the town, and noised abroad the terrible fate that hadbefallen the suitors; as soon, therefore, as the people heard of itthey gathered from every quarter, groaning and hooting before thehouse of Ulysses. They took the dead away, buried every man his own,and put the bodies of those who came from elsewhere on board thefishing vessels, for the fishermen to take each of them to his ownplace. They then met angrily in the place of assembly, and when theywere got together Eupeithes rose to speak. He was overwhelmed withgrief for the death of his son Antinous, who had been the first mankilled by Ulysses, so he said, weeping bitterly, "My friend, thisman has done the Achaeans great wrong. He took many of our best menaway with him in his fleet, and he has lost both ships and men; now,moreover, on his return he has been killing all the foremost men amongthe Cephallenians. Let us be up and doing before he can get away toPylos or to Elis where the Epeans rule, or we shall be ashamed ofourselves for ever afterwards. It will be an everlasting disgrace tous if we do not avenge the murder of our sons and brothers. For my ownpart I should have no mote pleasure in life, but had rather die atonce. Let us be up, then, and after them, before they can cross overto the mainland."
2.  So saying she bound on her glittering golden sandals,imperishable, with which she can fly like the wind over land or sea;she grasped the redoubtable bronze-shod spear, so stout and sturdy andstrong, wherewith she quells the ranks of heroes who have displeasedher, and down she darted from the topmost summits of Olympus,whereon forthwith she was in Ithaca, at the gateway of Ulysses' house,disguised as a visitor, Mentes, chief of the Taphians, and she helda bronze spear in her hand. There she found the lordly suitorsseated on hides of the oxen which they had killed and eaten, andplaying draughts in front of the house. Men-servants and pages werebustling about to wait upon them, some mixing wine with water in themixing-bowls, some cleaning down the tables with wet sponges andlaying them out again, and some cutting up great quantities of meat.
3.  "Father," replied Telemachus, "you will come to know me by and by,and when you do you will find that I can keep your counsel. I do notthink, however, the plan you propose will turn out well for eitherof us. Think it over. It will take us a long time to go the round ofthe farms and exploit the men, and all the time the suitors will bewasting your estate with impunity and without compunction. Prove thewomen by all means, to see who are disloyal and who guiltless, but Iam not in favour of going round and trying the men. We can attend tothat later on, if you really have some sign from Jove that he willsupport you."
4、  "Stockman," answered Ulysses, "you seem to be a very well-disposedperson, and I can see that you are a man of sense. Therefore I willtell you, and will confirm my words with an oath: by Jove, the chiefof all gods, and by that hearth of Ulysses to which I am now come,Ulysses shall return before you leave this place, and if you are sominded you shall see him killing the suitors who are now mastershere."
5、  "[The gale from the West had now spent its force, and the wind gotinto the South again, which frightened me lest I should be takenback to the terrible whirlpool of Charybdis. This indeed was whatactually happened, for I was borne along by the waves all night, andby sunrise had reacfied the rock of Scylla, and the whirlpool. She wasthen sucking down the salt sea water, but I was carried aloft towardthe fig tree, which I caught hold of and clung on to like a bat. Icould not plant my feet anywhere so as to stand securely, for theroots were a long way off and the boughs that overshadowed the wholepool were too high, too vast, and too far apart for me to reachthem; so I hung patiently on, waiting till the pool should dischargemy mast and raft again- and a very long while it seemed. A jurymanis not more glad to get home to supper, after having been longdetained in court by troublesome cases, than I was to see my raftbeginning to work its way out of the whirlpool again. At last I let gowith my hands and feet, and fell heavily into the sea, bard by my rafton to which I then got, and began to row with my hands. As for Scylla,the father of gods and men would not let her get further sight ofme- otherwise I should have certainly been lost.]

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  • 亚奥 08-07

      Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."

  • 季毓 08-07

      "Then,' he said, 'if you would finish your voyage and get homequickly, you must offer sacrifices to Jove and to the rest of the godsbefore embarking; for it is decreed that you shall not get back toyour friends, and to your own house, till you have returned to theheaven fed stream of Egypt, and offered holy hecatombs to the immortalgods that reign in heaven. When you have done this they will let youfinish your voyage.'

  • 于明发 08-07

       Then Jove's daughter Helen bethought her of another matter. Shedrugged the wine with an herb that banishes all care, sorrow, andill humour. Whoever drinks wine thus drugged cannot shed a single tearall the rest of the day, not even though his father and mother both ofthem drop down dead, or he sees a brother or a son hewn in piecesbefore his very eyes. This drug, of such sovereign power and virtue,had been given to Helen by Polydamna wife of Thon, a woman of Egypt,where there grow all sorts of herbs, some good to put into themixing-bowl and others poisonous. Moreover, every one in the wholecountry is a skilled physician, for they are of the race of Paeeon.When Helen had put this drug in the bowl, and had told the servants toserve the wine round, she said:

  • 刘芸杉 08-07

      "There I tried to land, but could not, for it was a bad place andthe waves dashed me against the rocks, so I again took to the seaand swam on till I came to a river that seemed the most likely landingplace, for there were no rocks and it was sheltered from the wind.Here, then, I got out of the water and gathered my senses togetheragain. Night was coming on, so I left the river, and went into athicket, where I covered myself all over with leaves, and presentlyheaven sent me off into a very deep sleep. Sick and sorry as I was Islept among the leaves all night, and through the next day tillafternoon, when I woke as the sun was westering, and saw yourdaughter's maid servants playing upon the beach, and your daughteramong them looking like a goddess. I besought her aid, and sheproved to be of an excellent disposition, much more so than could beexpected from so young a person- for young people are apt to bethoughtless. She gave me plenty of bread and wine, and when she hadhad me washed in the river she also gave me the clothes in which yousee me. Now, therefore, though it has pained me to do so, I havetold you the whole truth."

  • 黄小霞 08-06

    {  Then the old woman took the cauldron in which she was going towash his feet, and poured plenty of cold water into it, adding hottill the bath was warm enough. Ulysses sat by the fire, but ere longhe turned away from the light, for it occurred to him that when theold woman had hold of his leg she would recognize a certain scar whichit bore, whereon the whole truth would come out. And indeed as soon asshe began washing her master, she at once knew the scar as one thathad been given him by a wild boar when he was hunting on MountParnassus with his excellent grandfather Autolycus- who was the mostaccomplished thief and perjurer in the whole world- and with thesons of Autolycus. Mercury himself had endowed him with this gift, forhe used to burn the thigh bones of goats and kids to him, so he tookpleasure in his companionship. It happened once that Autolycus hadgone to Ithaca and had found the child of his daughter just born. Assoon as he had done supper Euryclea set the infant upon his kneesand said, you must find a name for your grandson; you greatly wishedthat you might have one."

  • 覃覃 08-05

      Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."}

  • 陈凌燕 08-05

      "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as myfather was here it was well with us and with the house, but the godsin their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden himaway more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden. I could haveborne it better even though he were dead, if he had fallen with hismen before Troy, or had died with friends around him when the daysof his fighting were done; for then the Achaeans would have built amound over his ashes, and I should myself have been heir to hisrenown; but now the storm-winds have spirited him away we know notwither; he is gone without leaving so much as a trace behind him,and I inherit nothing but dismay. Nor does the matter end simplywith grief for the loss of my father; heaven has laid sorrows uponme of yet another kind; for the chiefs from all our islands,Dulichium, Same, and the woodland island of Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying their court to my mother, who will neither pointblank say that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end; sothey are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so alsowith myself."

  • 程雪超 08-05

      To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."

  • 刁明康 08-04

       Then Pisistratus said, "Menelaus, son of Atreus, you are right inthinking that this young man is Telemachus, but he is very modest, andis ashamed to come here and begin opening up discourse with onewhose conversation is so divinely interesting as your own. Myfather, Nestor, sent me to escort him hither, for he wanted to knowwhether you could give him any counsel or suggestion. A son has alwaystrouble at home when his father has gone away leaving him withoutsupporters; and this is how Telemachus is now placed, for his fatheris absent, and there is no one among his own people to stand by him."

  • 黄春怡 08-02

    {  "'Strangers, who are you? Where do sail from? Are you traders, or doyou sail the as rovers, with your hands against every man, and everyman's hand against you?'

  • 傅世武 08-02

      "I was driven thence by foul winds for a space of nine days upon thesea, but on the tenth day we reached the land of the Lotus-eater,who live on a food that comes from a kind of flower. Here we landed totake in fresh water, and our crews got their mid-day meal on the shorenear the ships. When they had eaten and drunk I sent two of my companyto see what manner of men the people of the place might be, and theyhad a third man under them. They started at once, and went about amongthe Lotus-eaters, who did them no hurt, but gave them to eat of thelotus, which was so delicious that those who ate of it left off caringabout home, and did not even want to go back and say what had happenedto them, but were for staying and munching lotus with theLotus-eater without thinking further of their return; nevertheless,though they wept bitterly I forced them back to the ships and madethem fast under the benches. Then I told the rest to go on board atonce, lest any of them should taste of the lotus and leave off wantingto get home, so they took their places and smote the grey sea withtheir oars.

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