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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:朱光亚 大小:kZnS7PG171941KB 下载:beIdPMEI34673次
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日期:2020-08-09 23:39:52
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Moreover, in some apt and convenient place of thy house, theremust be a forge or furnace erected, framed in decent and formallfashion, and neere it a large table placed, ordered in such sort, asstanding upright on feete, and leaning the reines of thy backe againstit; thou must stande stedfastly in that manner every night, withoutthe least motion or stirring, untill the breake of day appeareth,and thine eyes still uppon the Furnace fixed, to keepe ever in memory,the true order which I have prescribed. So soone as the morning isseene, thou mayest (if thou wilt) walke, or rest a little upon thybed, and afterward go about thy businesse, if thou have any. Then goto dinner, attending readily till the evenings approch, preparing suchthings as I will readily set thee downe in writing, without whichthere is not any thing to bee done; and then returne to the same taskeagaine, not varying a jot from the course directed. Before the time befully expired, thou shalt perceive many apparant signes, that thestone is still in absolute forwardnesse, but it will bee utterlylost if thou fayle in the least of all the observances. And when theexperience hath crowned thy labour, thou art sure to have thePhilosophers stone, and thereby shalt be able to enrich all, and workewonders beside.
2.  Messer Guiglielmo Rossiglione, alighting from his horse, andhaving a keene knife ready drawne in his hand; opened therewith thebrest of dead Guardastagno, and taking foorth his heart with hisowne hands, wrapped it in the Bandelote belonging to his Lance,commanding one of his men to the charge thereof, and never to disclosethe deed. So, mounting on horse-backe againe, and darke nightdrawing on apace, he returned home to his Castle. The Lady, who hadheard before of Guardastagnoes intent, to suppe there that night,and (perhaps) being earnestly desirous to see him; marvailing at hisso long tarrying, saide to her husband: Beleeve me Sir (quoth she)me thinkes it is somewhat strange, that Messer Guiglielmo Guardastagnodelayes his comming so long, he never used to do so till now. Ireceived tidings from him wife (saide he) that he cannot be heretill to morrow. Whereat the Lady appearing to be displeased, concealedit to herselfe, and used no more words.
3.  By this time, Publius, the father of Titus, was departed out of thismortall life, and letters came to Athens, that with all speed heshould returne to Rome, to take order for occasions there concerninghim; wherefore he concluded with Gisippus about his departure, andtaking Sophronia thither with him, which was no easie matter to bedone, until it were first known, how occasions had bin caried amongthem. Wherupon, calling her one day into her Chamber, they told herentirely, how all had past, which Titus confirmed substantially, bysuch direct passages betweene themselves, as exceeded allpossibility of denyall, and moved in her much admiration; looking eachon other very discontentedly, she heavily weeping and lamenting, andgreatly complaining of Gisippus, for wronging her so unkindly.
4.  INCONVENIENCES, BEFORE THEY DO PROCEEDE TOO FARRE
5.  Stolne pleasures are delightfull in the taste,
6.  This seemed a happy opportunity to Manutio, to sing the dittie sopurposely done and devised: which hee delivered in such excellentmanner, the voice and Instrument concording so extraordinary pleasing;that all the persons then in the Presence, seemed rather Statues, thenliving men, so strangely they were wrapt with admiration, and the Kinghimselfe farre beyond all the rest, transported with a rare kinde ofalteration.

计划指导

1.  nor of them who have sooner made testimonie of marriage by theirbellies, then those ceremonies due to matrimonie, or publicationthereof by the tongue; so that meere necessity and constraint, hathforced the parents to yeeld consent: which hath not so happened toSophronia, for she was given to me by Gisippus discreetly, honestly,and orderly.
2.  Some of them were ancient Signiors of the house, and yet but meereNovices (as all the rest were) in these cunning and politiquestratagems of the Lord Abbot, when hee intended to punish any one inPurgatory: and therefore, being affrighted, and amazed at this rareaccident; they fled away from him, running to the Abbot, who makinga shew to them, as if he were but new come forth of his Oratory, ina kinde of pacifying speeches, saide; Peace my deare Sonnes, be notaffraide, but fetch the Crosse and Holy-water hither; then followme, and I will shew you, what miracles the Fates have pleased toshew in our Convent, therefore be silent, and make no more noise;all which was performed according to his command.
3.  Now was Saladine and his Baschaes halfe astonyed with admiration, atthe magnificent minde of Signiour Thorello, who would not forget theleast part of courtesie towardes them, and greatly doubted (seeing thebeauty and riches of the Garments) least they were discovered byThorello. Neverthelesse, one of them thus answered the Lady. Beleeveme Madame, these are rich guiftes, not lightly either to be given,rich or receyved: but in regard of your strict imposition, we arenot able to deny them. This being done, with most gracious andcourteous demeanour, she departed from them, leaving her Husband tokeepe them still companie; who furnished their servants also, withdivers worthy necessaries fitting for their journey.
4.  These wordes, were of a quite contrary complexion, to those whichthe Lady expected from her, and for effecting the promise made untohir Sonne: howbeit (like a wise and noble Ladie) much she inwardlycommended the maids answers, and said unto her. But tell meGianetta, what if my Lord the King (who is a gallant youthfull Prince,and you so bright a beautie as you are) should take pleasure in yourlove, would ye denie him? Sodainly the Maide returned this answer:Madame, the King perhaps might enforce me, but with my free consent,hee shall never have any thing of me that is not honest. Nor did theLady dislike her Maides courage and resolution, but breaking of allher further conference, intended shortly to put her project in proofe,saying to her son, that when he was fully recovered, he should haveprivate accesse to Gianetta, whom shee doubted not but would betractable enough to him; for she helde it no meane blemish to herhonour, to moove the Maide any more in the matter, but let himcompasse it as he could.
5.  The Lord Abbot recreated himselfe a while with his owne people, towhom he recounted, the course of his life since hee saw them; and theylikewise told him, how kindly they had bin initeated by Ghinotto.But when dinner time was come, the Lord Abbot and all his company,were served with costly viands and excellent Wines, without Ghinottoesmaking himselfe knowne to the Abbot: till after he had beeneentertained some few dayes in this order: into the great Hall of theCastle, Ghinotto caused all the Abbots goods and furniture to beebrought, and likewise into a spacious Court, wheron the windowes ofthe said Court gazed, all his mules and horses, with their sumpters,even to the very silliest of them, which being done, Ghinotto wentto the Abbot, and demaunded of him, how he felt his stomacke now,and whether it would serve him to venter on horsebacke as yet, orno? The Lord Abbot answered, that he found his stomacke perfectlyrecovered, his body strong enough to endure travell, and all thingswell, so hee were delivered from Ghinotto.
6.  At the first, Signior Gilberto waxed exceeding angry, but when hefurther considered withall, the pure and honest intention of his Wife;wisely he pacified his former distemper, and saide. Dianora, it is notthe part of a wise and honest woman, to lend an eare to ambassagesof such immodest nature, much lesse to compound or make agreementfor her honesty, with any person, under any condition whatsoever.Those perswasions which the heart listeneth to, by allurement of theeare, have greater power then many do imagine, and nothing is souneasie or difficult, but in a lovers judgement it appeareth possible.Ill didst thou therefore first of all to listen, but worse (afterward)to contract.

推荐功能

1.  Calandrino perceiving, that all his protestations could winne nocredit with them, who had now the Law remaining in their owne hands,and purposed to deale with him as they pleased: apparantly saw, thatsighing and sorrow did nothing availe him. Moreover, to fall intohis wives tempestuous stormes of chiding, would bee worse to himthen racking or torturing: he gladly therefore gave them money, to buythe two couple of Capons and Wine, being heartily contentedlikewise, that hee was so well delivered from them. So the merryPriest, Bruno, and Buffalmaco, having taken good order for salting theBrawne; closely carried it with them to Florence, leaving Calandrinoto complaine of his losse, and well requited, for mocking them withthe invisible stones.
2.  Master Chappelet still wept and sighed, and continued silent,notwithstanding all the Confessors comfortable perswasions; butafter hee had helde him a long while in suspence, breathing forth asighe, even as if his very heart would have broken, he saide; HolyFather, seeing you promise to pray to God for me, I will reveale it toyou: Know then, that when I was a little boy, I did once curse myMother; which he had no sooner spoken, but he wrung his hands, andgreeved extraordinarily. Oh good Son, saide the Friar: doth that seemeso great a sinne to thee? Why, men doe daily blaspheme our Lord God,and yet neverthelesse, upon their hearty repentance, he is alwayesready to forgive them; and wilt not thou beleeve to obtaine remission,for a sinne so ignorantly committed? Weepe no more deare Sonne, butcomfort thy selfe and rest resolved, that if thou wert one of them,who nayled our blessed Saviour to his Crosse; yet being so trulyrepentant, as I see thou art, he would freely forgive thee. Say you soFather? quoth Chappelet. What mine owne deare Mother? that bare mein her wombe nine moneths, day and night, and afterwards fed me withher breasts a thousand times, can I be pardoned for cursing her? Ohno, it is too haynous a sinne, and except you pray to God veryinstantly for me, he will not forgive me.
3.  Loe thus I dye, in jealousie,
4.  During the time of this their clamourous contending, the Judge beingvery willy willing to heare either party: Matteuzzo, upon a signereceived from the other, which was a word in Masoes pleading, laideholde on the broken boord, as also on the Judges low-hanging Breech,plucking at them both so strongly, that they fell downe immediately,the Breeches being onely tyed but with one Poynt before. He hearingthe boards breaking underneath him, and such maine pulling at hisBreeches; strove (as he sate) to make them fast before, but thePoynt being broken, and Maso crying in his eare on the one side, asRibi did the like in the other; hee was at his wits end to defendhimselfe. My Lord (quoth Maso) you may bee ashamed that you doe me notjustice, why will you not heare mee, but wholly lend your eare to mineAdversary? My Lord (said Ribi) never was Libell preferd into thisCourt, of such a paltry trifling matter, and therefore I must, andwill have Justice.
5.   Bruno, as heaven knoweth, there is not this day any creature living,for whom I would gladly do more, then for thee, and the very leastword of thy mouth, hath power to commaund mee to goe bare-footed, evenfrom hence so farre as to Peretola, and account my labour wellemployed for thy sake: wherefore, never wonder at my continuallkindnesse towards thee, using thee as my Domesticke companion, andembracing thee as my bosome friend, and therefore I am the bolder inmooving one request unto thee. As thou well knowest, it is no longwhile since, when thou diddest acquaint me with the behaviour of theCorsicane Roving Company, to be one in so rare and excellent aSociety, such hath bin my earnest longing ever since, as day nor nighthave I enjoyed anie rest, but should thinke my felicity beyond allcompare, if I could be entertained in fellowship among you.
6.  As I have heard reported by many, there sometime lived in Perouse orPerugia, a young man, named Andrea de Piero, whose profession was totrade about Horses, in the nature of a Horse-courser, orHorsemaster, who hearing of a good Faire or Market (for his purpose)at Naples, did put five hundred Crownes of gold in his purse, andjourneyed thither in the company of other Horse-coursers, arrivingthere on a Sunday in the evening. According to instructions givenhim by his Host, he went the next day into the Horse-market, wherehe saw very many Horses that he liked, cheapening their prices as hewent up and downe, but could fall to no agreement; yet to manifestthat he came purposely to buy, and not as a cheapener onely,oftentimes (like a shallow-brainde trader in the world) he shewedhis purse of gold before all passengers, never respecting who, or whatthey were that observed his follie.

应用

1.  She being thus happily bestowne, he minded to tarry no longer inLondon; but, in his wonted begging manner, travailing thorough theCountry with his sonne Perotto, at length he came into Wales: butnot without much weary paine and travell, being never used before,to journey so far on foot. There dwelt another Lord, in office ofMarshalship to the King of England, whose power extended over thoseparts: a man of very great authority, keeping a most noble andbountifull house, which they termed the President of Wales hisCourt; whereto the Count and his Son oftentimes resorted, as findingthere good releefe and comfort. On a day, one of the Presidentssons, accompanied with divers other Gentlemens children, wereperforming certaine youthfull sports, and pastimes, as running,leaping, and such like, wherein Perotto presumed to make one amongthem, excelling all the rest in such commendable manner, as none ofthem came any thing nere him. Divers times the President had takennotice thereof, and was so well pleased with the Lads behaviour,that he enquired of whence he was? Answere was made, that he was apoore mans Son, that every day came for an almes to his gate.
2.  The Novell delivered, by Madame Neiphila, seemed so pleasing toall the Ladies; as they could not refraine from hearty laughter,beside much liberality of speech. Albeit the King did oftentimesurge silence, and commanded Pamphilus to follow next. So, whenattention was admitted, Pamphilus began in this order. I am ofopinion, faire Ladies, that there is not any matter, how uneasie ordoubtfull soever it may seeme to be; but the man or woman thataffecteth fervently, dare boldly attempt, and effectuallyaccomplish. And this perswasion of mine, although it hath beenesufficiently approved, by many of our passed Novels: Yetnotwithstanding, I shall make it much apparent to you, by a presentdiscourse of mine owne. Wherein I have occasion to speake of a Lady,to whom Fortune was more favourable, then either reason orjudgement, could give direction. In which regard, I would not adviseany of you, to entertaine so high an imagination of minde, as totracke her footsteps of whom I am now to speake: because Fortunecontaineth not alwayes one and the same disposition, neither can allmens eyes be blinded after one manner. And so proceed we to our Tale.
3.  Soone after, Calandrino started up, and perceiving by their loudespeaking, that they talked of nothing which required secretCounsell: he went into their company (the onely thing which Masodesired) and holding on still the former Argument; Calandrino wouldneeds request to know, in what place these precious stones were tobe found, which had such excellent vertues in them? Maso made answere,that the most of them were to be had in Berlinzona, neere to theCity of Bascha, which was in the Territory of a Countrey, calledBengodi, where the Vines were bound about with Sawcidges, a Goosewas sold for a penny, and the Goslings freely given in to boote. Therewas also an high mountaine wholly made of Parmezane, grated Cheese,whereon dwelt people, who did nothing else but make Mocharones andRavivolies, boyling them with broth of Capons, and afterward hurledthem all about, to whosoever can or will catch them. Neere to thismountaine runneth a faire River, the whole streame being pure whiteBastard, none such was ever sold for any money, and without one dropof water in it.
4、  Peradventure the Novell related by Madam Aemillia, did not extend itselfe so farre in length, as it mooved compassion in the Ladiesmindes, the hard fortunes of Beritol and her Children, which hadincited them to weeping: but that it pleased the Queen (upon the Talesconclusion) to command Pamphilus, to follow next in order with hisDiscourse; and he being thereto very obedient, began in this manner.
5、  Thus Massetto being rich and olde, returned home like a wealthyfather, taking no care for the nursing of his children, but bequeathedthem to the place where they were bred and borne, having (by his witand ingenious apprehension) made such a benefit of his youthfullyeeres, that now he merrily tooke ease in his age.

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  • 杨溪亮 08-08

      WHEREIN IS PLAINLY PROVED, THAT LOVE CANNOT BE ROOTED UPPE,

  • 郑瑞福 08-08

      Fearing least their offence might come to open publication, theyburied it very secretly; and, before any could take notice thereof,they departed from Messina, and went to dwell in Naples, Isabellacrying and calling still for her pot of Basile, being unable to giveover mourning, dyed within a few dayes after. Thus have you heardthe hard fate of poore Lorenzo and his Isabella. Within no longwhile after, when this accident came to be publikely knowne, anexcellent ditty was composed thereof beginning thus.

  • 华严岗 08-08

       When the Brethren had imparted their loves extreamity each to theother, and plainely perceyved, that though they were equally intheir fiery torments, yet their desires were utterly contrary: theybegan severally to consider, that gaine gotten by Mirchandize,admitted an equall and honest division, but this purchase was of adifferent quality, pleading the title of a sole possession, withoutany partner or intruder. Fearefull and jealous were they both, leasteither should ayme at the others intention, yet willing enough toshake hands, in ridding Amurath out of the way, who onely was thehinderer of their hopes, Whereupon they concluded together, that ona day when the Ship sayled on very swiftly, and Amurath was sittingupon the Decke, studiously observing how the Billowes combatted eachwith other, and not suspecting any such treason in them towards him:stealing softly behinde him, sodainely they threw him into the Sea,the shippe floating on above halfe a Leagues distance, before anyperceived his fall into the Sea. When the Ladie heard thereof, and sawno likely meanes of recovering him againe, she fell to her wontedteares and lamentations: but the two Lovers came quickely to comforther, using kinde words and pithy perswasions (albeit she understoodthem not, or at the most very little) to appease the violence of herpassions; and, to speak uprightly, she did not so much emoane thelosse of Amurath, as the multiplying of her owne misfortunes, stillone succeeding in the necke of another. After divers long and welldelivered Orations, as also very faire and courteous behaviour, theyhad indifferently pacified her complainings: they beganne to discourseand commune with themselves, which of them had most right and title toAlathiella, and consequently ought to enjoy her. Now that Amurathwas gone, each pleaded his priviledge to bee as good as the others,both in the Ship, Goods, and all advantages else whatsoever happening:which the elder brother absolutely denied, alleadging first hispropriety of birth, a reason sufficient, whereby his younger oughtto give him place: Likewise, his right and interest both in the shipand goods, to be more then the others, as being heire to his father,and therefore in justice to be highest preferred. Last of all, thathis strength onely threw Amurath into the Sea, and therefore gavehim the full possession of his prize, no right at all remaining to hisbrother.

  • 曲忠赞 08-08

      THE SECOND DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL

  • 洪志诚 08-07

    {  After this Song was ended, they sung divers other beside, and havinggreat variety of instruments' they played to them as many pleasingdances. But the Queene considering that the meete houre for rest wascome, with their lighted Torches before them, they all repaired totheir Chambers; sparing the other dayes next succeeding, for thosereasons by the Queene alledged, and spending the Sunday in solemnedevotion.

  • 高洪 08-06

      Not long had they run on this race, but the Treasures lefte themby their Father, began greatly to diminish; and their Revennewessuffised not, to support such lavish expences as they had begun: butthey fell to engaging and pawning their inheritances, selling one today, and another to morrow, so that they saw themselves quickelycome to nothing, and then poverty opened their eyes, which prodigalityhad before clozed up. Heereupon, Lamberto (on a day) calling hisBrethren to him, shewed them what the honors of their Father hadbeene, to what height his wealth amounted, and now to what an ebbeof poverty it was falne, only thorow their inordinate expences.Wherefore hee counselled them, (as best he could) before furthermisery insulted over them, to make sale of the small remainder thatwas left, and then to betake themselves unto some other abiding, wherefairer Fortune might chance to shine uppon them.}

  • 安歌 08-06

      When I lived at ease,

  • 张慎峰 08-06

      The simple maiden, aged perhaps some fourteen years, moved rather bya childish whim than any real vocation, set out on the morrow aloneand telling nobody to walk into the desert. So firmly was she resolvedthat after several days of hardship she reached the wilderness ofThebais. From afar she descried a little hut, and coming up to it,found there a holy man. Amazed to see such a one there, he askedwhat she came to seek. Her answer was that, aspiring towards God,she came thither to serve Him, and in the hope of finding a teacher tothat end.

  • 晁向荣 08-05

       Well perceived the Scholler, by the weaknesse of her voyce, andscorching of her body by the Suns parching beames, that shee wasbrought now to great extremity: which sight, as also her humbleintercession, began to touch him with some compassion, nevertheles,thus he replied. Wicked woman, my hands shal be no means of thy death,but make use of thine owne, if thou be so desirous to have it: andas much water shalt thou get of me to asswage thy thirst, as thougavest me fire to comfort my freezing, when thou wast in the luxuriousheat of thy immodest desires, and I wel-neere frozen to death withextremity of cold. Pray that the Evening may raine downe Rosewateron thee, because that in the River of Arno is not good enough forthee: for as little pitty doe I take on thee now, as thou didst extendcompassion to me then.

  • 徐某才 08-03

    {  This hurrie and amazement being in the house, the Brides weeping,the Ladies lamenting, and all the servants confusedly wondering;Chynon and Lysimachus (with their Friends) having their weaponsdrawn in their hands, made all opposers to give them way, and sogayned the stair head for their owne descending. There stoodPasimonda, with an huge long Staffe in his hand, to hinder theirpassage downe the stayres; but Chynon saluted him so soundly on thehead, that it being cleft in twaine, he fell dead before his feete.His Brother Hormisda came to his rescue, and sped in the selfe-samemanner as he had done; so did divers other beside, whom the companionsto Lysimachus and Chynon, either slew out-right, or wounded.

  • 罗琳·艾莉森 08-03

      Abraham a Jew, being admonished or advised by a friend of his,named Jehannot de Chevigny, travailed from Paris unto Rome: Andbeholding there the wicked behaviour of men in the Church, returnedbacke to Paris againe, where yet (neverthelesse) he became aChristian.

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