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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:何华 大小:jMxYDrAe59434KB 下载:LmzzjJ0a50762次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:9hmvs6wa98117条
日期:2020-08-06 12:58:07
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Then came also the ghost of Theban Teiresias, with his goldensceptre in his hand. He knew me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son ofLaertes, why, poor man, have you left the light of day and come downto visit the dead in this sad place? Stand back from the trench andwithdraw your sword that I may drink of the blood and answer yourquestions truly.'
2.  The suitors were surprised and angry at what had happened, so theywent outside the great wall that ran round the outer court, and held acouncil near the main entrance. Eurymachus, son of Polybus, was thefirst to speak.
3.  Thus did they converse, and they had only a very little time leftfor sleep, for it was soon daybreak. In the meantime Telemachus andhis crew were nearing land, so they loosed the sails, took down themast, and rowed the ship into the harbour. They cast out their mooringstones and made fast the hawsers; they then got out upon the seashore, mixed their wine, and got dinner ready. As soon as they had hadenough to eat and drink Telemachus said, "Take the ship on to thetown, but leave me here, for I want to look after the herdsmen onone of my farms. In the evening, when I have seen all I want, I willcome down to the city, and to-morrow morning in return for yourtrouble I will give you all a good dinner with meat and wine."
4.  "And I said, 'Agamemnon, why do you ask me? I do not know whetheryour son is alive or dead, and it is not right to talk when one doesnot know.'
5.  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.
6.  But Telemachus said, "Hush, do not answer him; Antinous has thebitterest tongue of all the suitors, and he makes the others worse."

计划指导

1.  Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."
2.  "On this the men would have come with me at once, but Eurylochustried to hold them back and said, 'Alas, poor wretches that we are,what will become of us? Rush not on your ruin by going to the house ofCirce, who will turn us all into pigs or wolves or lions, and we shallhave to keep guard over her house. Remember how the Cyclops treated uswhen our comrades went inside his cave, and Ulysses with them. Itwas all through his sheer folly that those men lost their lives.'
3.  "She is still at the house," replied Eumaeus, "grieving and breakingher heart, and doing nothing but weep, both night and daycontinually."
4.  "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."
5.  "'When you have reached this spot, as I now tell you, dig a trench acubit or so in length, breadth, and depth, and pour into it as adrink-offering to all the dead, first, honey mixed with milk, thenwine, and in the third place water-sprinkling white barley meal overthe whole. Moreover you must offer many prayers to the poor feebleghosts, and promise them that when you get back to Ithaca you willsacrifice a barren heifer to them, the best you have, and will loadthe pyre with good things. More particularly you must promise thatTeiresias shall have a black sheep all to himself, the finest in allyour flocks.
6.  As he spoke he went up to Ulysses and saluted him with his righthand; "Good day to you, father stranger," said he, "you seem to bevery poorly off now, but I hope you will have better times by andby. Father Jove, of all gods you are the most malicious. We are yourown children, yet you show us no mercy in all our misery andafflictions. A sweat came over me when I saw this man, and my eyesfilled with tears, for he reminds me of Ulysses, who I fear is goingabout in just such rags as this man's are, if indeed he is still amongthe living. If he is already dead and in the house of Hades, then,alas! for my good master, who made me his stockman when I was quiteyoung among the Cephallenians, and now his cattle are countless; noone could have done better with them than I have, for they have bredlike ears of corn; nevertheless I have to keep bringing them in forothers to eat, who take no heed of his son though he is in thehouse, and fear not the wrath of heaven, but are already eager todivide Ulysses' property among them because he has been away solong. I have often thought- only it would not be right while his sonis living- of going off with the cattle to some foreign country; badas this would be, it is still harder to stay here and be ill-treatedabout other people's herds. My position is intolerable, and I shouldlong since have run away and put myself under the protection of someother chief, only that I believe my poor master will yet return, andsend all these suitors flying out of the house."

推荐功能

1.  "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."
2.  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.
3.  He had hardly done speaking when Amphinomus turned in his placeand saw the ship inside the harbour, with the crew lowering her sails,and putting by their oars; so he laughed, and said to the others,"We need not send them any message, for they are here. Some god musthave told them, or else they saw the ship go by, and could notovertake her.
4.  "He got more and more furious as he heard me, so he tore the topfrom off a high mountain, and flung it just in front of my ship sothat it was within a little of hitting the end of the rudder. Thesea quaked as the rock fell into it, and the wash of the wave itraised carried us back towards the mainland, and forced us towards theshore. But I snatched up a long pole and kept the ship off, makingsigns to my men by nodding my head, that they must row for theirlives, whereon they laid out with a will. When we had got twice as faras we were before, I was for jeering at the Cyclops again, but the menbegged and prayed of me to hold my tongue.
5.   To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."
6.  "At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, forshe was of a good natural disposition; moreover there was a bardwith her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out forTroy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven hadcounselled her destruction, Aegisthus thus this bard off to a desertisland and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon- afterwhich she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus. Then heoffered many burnt sacrifices to the gods, and decorated manytemples with tapestries and gilding, for he had succeeded far beyondhis expectations.

应用

1.  To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."
2.  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, he againlit his fire, milked his goats and ewes, all quite rightly, and thenlet each have her own young one; as soon as he had got through withall his work, he clutched up two more of my men, and began eating themfor his morning's meal. Presently, with the utmost ease, he rolled thestone away from the door and drove out his sheep, but he at once putit back again- as easily as though he were merely clapping the lidon to a quiver full of arrows. As soon as he had done so he shouted,and cried 'Shoo, shoo,' after his sheep to drive them on to themountain; so I was left to scheme some way of taking my revenge andcovering myself with glory.
3.  Then the swineherd and the stockman left the cloisters together, andUlysses followed them. When they had got outside the gates and theouter yard, Ulysses said to them quietly:
4、  "Eurymachus," answered Ulysses, "if you and I were to work oneagainst the other in early summer when the days are at theirlongest- give me a good scythe, and take another yourself, and letus see which will fast the longer or mow the stronger, from dawntill dark when the mowing grass is about. Or if you will ploughagainst me, let us each take a yoke of tawny oxen, well-mated and ofgreat strength and endurance: turn me into a four acre field, andsee whether you or I can drive the straighter furrow. If, again, warwere to break out this day, give me a shield, a couple of spears and ahelmet fitting well upon my temples- you would find me foremost in thefray, and would cease your gibes about my belly. You are insolentand cruel, and think yourself a great man because you live in a littleworld, ind that a bad one. If Ulysses comes to his own again, thedoors of his house are wide, but you will find them narrow when youtry to fly through them."
5、  As he spoke he placed the sword in the hands of Ulysses and said,"Good luck to you, father stranger; if anything has been said amissmay the winds blow it away with them, and may heaven grant you asafe return, for I understand you have been long away from home, andhave gone through much hardship."

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网友评论(ytspJ7cD26699))

  • 蔡辉胜 08-05

      "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."

  • 王二虎 08-05

      "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?

  • 李荣强 08-05

       Thus did he speak, and his words pleased them well, so they roseforthwith and went to the house of Ulysses where they took theiraccustomed seats.

  • 奥勒丹 08-05

      BOOK VIII.

  • 王荣称 08-04

    {  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors incheck, no matter what they do; go back both of you and bindMelanthius' hands and feet behind him. Throw him into the store roomand make the door fast behind you; then fasten a noose about his body,and string him close up to the rafters from a high bearing-post,that he may linger on in an agony."

  • 梁永祥 08-03

      Now there was a trap door on the wall, while at one end of thepavement there was an exit leading to a narrow passage, and thisexit was closed by a well-made door. Ulysses told Philoetius tostand by this door and guard it, for only one person could attack itat a time. But Agelaus shouted out, "Cannot some one go up to the trapdoor and tell the people what is going on? Help would come at once,and we should soon make an end of this man and his shooting."}

  • 郭文景 08-03

      AND NOW, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus- harbinger oflight alike to mortals and immortals- the gods met in council and withthem, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king. Thereon Minervabegan to tell them of the many sufferings of Ulysses, for she pitiedhim away there in the house of the nymph Calypso.

  • 吴锺昊 08-03

      "I agreed to this, so I went back to the sea shore, and found themen at the ship weeping and wailing most piteously. When they saw methe silly blubbering fellows began frisking round me as calves breakout and gambol round their mothers, when they see them coming hometo be milked after they have been feeding all day, and the homesteadresounds with their lowing. They seemed as glad to see me as thoughthey had got back to their own rugged Ithaca, where they had been bornand bred. 'Sir,' said the affectionate creatures, 'we are as glad tosee you back as though we had got safe home to Ithaca; but tell us allabout the fate of our comrades.'

  • 黄学民 08-02

       Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.

  • 索朗 07-31

    {  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."

  • 阿尔金山 07-31

      To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."

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