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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:赵勇 大小:svEI8FNW13672KB 下载:rI15hjFU37204次
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日期:2020-08-09 02:23:59
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then every one could presently say, that Signior Guido had spokennothing but the truth, and were much ashamed of their owne folly,and shallow estimation which they had made of Guido, desiring nevermore after to meddle with him so grossely, and thanking Signior Betto,for so well reforming their ignorance, by his much betterapprehension.
2.  When she saw that this domesticke disquietnesse returned her nobenefit, but rather tended to her own consumption, then anyamendment in her miserable Husband, shee began thus to conferre withher private thoughts. This Husband of mine liveth with me, as if hewere no Husband, or I his Wife; the marriage bed, which should be acomfort to us both, seemeth hatefull to him, and as little pleasing tomee, because his minde is on his money, his head busied with worldlycogitations, and early and late in his counting-house, admitting nofamiliar conversation with me. Why should not I be as respectlesseof him, as he declares him selfe to be of me? I tooke him for anHusband, brought him a good and sufficient Dowry, thinking him to beman, and affected a woman as a man ought to doe, else he had neverbeene any Husband of mine. If he be a Woman hater, why did he makechoice of me to be his Wife? If I had not intended to be of the World,I could have coopt my selfe up in a Cloyster, and shorne my selfe aNunne, but that I was not born to such severity of life. My youthshall be blasted with age before I can truly understand what youth is,and I shall be branded with the disgraceful word barrennesse,knowing my selfe meete and able to be a Mother, were my Husband butwort the name of a Father, or expected issue and posterity, to leaveour memoriall to after times in our race, as all our predecessoursformerly have done, and for which mariage was chiefly instituted.Castles long besieged, doe yeeld at the last, and women wronged bytheir owne husbands, can hardly warrant their owne frailety,especially living among so many temptations, which flesh and bloud arenot alwaies able to resist. Well, I meane to be advised in thiscase, before I will hazard my honest reputation, either to suspitionor scandall, then which, no woman can have two heavier enemies, andvery few there are that can escape them.
3.  THE FIRST DAY, THE EIGHT NOVELL
4.  Then he began to distinguish her parts, commending the tresses ofher haire, which he imagined to be of gold; her forehead, nose, mouth,necke, armes, but (above all) her brests, appearing (as yet) but onelyto shew themselves, like two little mountaines. So that, of afielden clownish lout, he would needs now become a Judge of beauty,coveting earnestly in his soule, to see her eyes, which were veiledover with sound sleepe, that kept them fast enclosed together, andonely to looke on them, hee wished a thousand times, that she wouldawake. For, in his judgement, she excelled all the women that everhe had seene, and doubted, whether she were some Goddesse or no; sostrangely was he metamorphosed from folly, to a sensible apprehension,more then common. And so farre did this sodaine knowledge in himextend; that he could conceive of divine and celestiall things, andthat they were more to be admired and reverenced, then those of humaneor terrene consideration; wherefore the more gladly he contentedhimselfe, to tarry till she awaked of her owne accord. And althoughthe time of stay seemed tedious to him, yet notwithstanding, he wasovercome with such extraordinary contentment, as he had no power todepart thence, but stood as if he had bin glued fast to the ground.
5.  A fond and foolish opinion overswayed her, that the Scholler wasextraordinarily skilfull in the Art of Nigromancy, and could therebyso over-rule the heart of her lost friend, as hee should bee compelledto love her againe, in as effectuall manner as before; herewithimmediately she acquainted her Lady, who being as rashly credulous, asher maide was opinionative (never considring, that if the Scholler hadany experience in Negromancy, hee would thereby have procured his ownesuccesse) gave releefe to her surmise, in very joviall and comfortablemanner, and entreated her in all kindnes, to know of him, whether hecould worke such a businesse, or no, and (upon his undertaking toeffect it) shee would give absolute assurance, that (in recompencethereof) he should unfainedly obtaine his hearts desire. Ancilla wasquicke and expeditious, in delivering this message to discontentedReniero, whose soule being ready to mount out of his body, onely byconceit of joy; chearefully thus he said within himselfe. GraciousFortune! how highly am I obliged to thee for this so great favour? Nowthou hast blest me with a happy time, to be justly revenged on sowicked a woman, who sought the utter ruine of my life, in recompenceof the unfaigned affection I bare her. Returne to thy Lady (quothhe) and saluting her first on my behalfe, bid her to abandon allcare in this businesse; for, if her amourous Friend were in India, Iwould make him come (in meere despight of his heart) and crave mercyof her for his base transgression. But concerning the meanes how,and in what manner it is to bee done, especially on her ownebehalfe: I will impart it to her so soone as she pleaseth: faile notto tell her so constantly from me, with all my utmost paines at herservice.
6.  Giosefo also relating, wherefore he came thither; the Kingreplying onely thus: Goe to the Goose Bridge: and presently Giosefohad also his dismission from the King. Comming forth, he found Melissoattending for him, and revealed in what manner the King had answeredhim: whereupon, they consulted together, concerning both theiransweres, which seemed either to exceed their comprehension, or elsewas delivered them in meere mockery, and therefore (more then halfediscontented) they returned homeward againe.

计划指导

1.  THE TENTH DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL
2.  REPREHENDING THE FOLLY OF SUCH MEN, AS UNDERTAKE TO REPORT
3.  Having thus spoken, he turned to the Lady, saying. Madame, I nowdischarge you of all promises made me, delivering you to yourHusband franke and free: And when he had given him the Lady, and thechild in his armes, he returned to his place, and sate downe againe.Nicoluccio, with no meane joy and hearty contentment received both hiswife and childe, being before farre from expectation of such anadmirable comfort; returning the Knight infinite thankes (as all therest of the Company pany the like) who could not refraine from weepingfor meere joy, for such a strange and wonderful accident: every onehighly commending Gentile, and such also as chanced to hearethereof. The Lady was welcommed home to her owne house, with manymoneths of joviall feasting, and as she passed through the streets,all beheld her with admiration, to be so happily recovered from hergrave Signior Gentile lived long after, a loyall friend toNicoluccio and his Lady, and all that were well-willers to them.
4.  After the promise was thus faithfully made, and they still keepingcompany, as they were wont to doe: It fortuned, that Tingocciobecame Gossip to one, named Ambrosio Anselmino, dwelling inCamporegglo, who by his wife, called Monna Mita, had a sweet andlovely Sonne. Tingoccio often resorting thither, and consorted withhis companion Meucio; the she-Gossip, being a woman worthy the loving,faire and comely of her person. Tingoccio, notwithstanding theGossipship betweene them, had more then a moneths minde to hisGodchilds Mother. Meucio also fell sicke of the same disease,because shee seemed Fleasing in his eye, and Tingoccio gave he nomeane commendations; yet, carefully hey concealed their love tothemselves, but not for one and the same occasion. Because Tingocciokept it closely from Meucio, lest he should hold it disgracefull inhim, to beare amourous affection to his Gossip, and thought itunfitting to bee knowne. But Meucio had no such meaning, for heeknew well enough that Tingoccio loved her, and therefore conceivedin his minde, that if he discovered any such matter to him: He will(quoth he) be jealous of me, and being her Gossip (which admitteth hisconference with her when himselfe pleaseth;) he may easily make her todistaste me, and therefore I must rest contented as I am.
5.  Such a sacred sweete,
6.  After that the sad and discomfortable night had spent it selfe,and the break of day was beginning to appeare; Ancilla thewaiting-woman, according as she was instructed by her Lady, went downeand opened the Court doore, and seeming exceedingly to compassionatethe Schollers unfortunate night of sufferance, saide unto him.

推荐功能

1.  WITHALL, THAT NEITHER FEARE, DANGERS, NOR DEATH IT SELFE,
2.  LOVE TO THEM: EXCEPT THEY INTEND TO SEEKE THEIR OWNE
3.  Thou tookst advantage:
4.  Never more shall thy falshoode me enfolde.
5.   Pucclo mervalling at this answere, knowing she never gave him thelike before; demanded againe, what she did? The subtle wench,remembring that she had not answered as became her, said: Pardon meeFather, my wits were not mine owne, when you demanded such a sodainequestion; and I have heard you say an hundred times, that when folkego supperles to bed, either they walke in their sleepe, or beingawake, talke very idely, as (no doubt) you have discern'd by me. Naydaughter (quoth he) it may be, that I was in a waking dreame, andthought I heard the olde wall totter: but I see I was deceived, for noit is quiet and still enough. Talke no more good Father, saide she,least you stirre from your place, and hinder your labour: take no carefor mee, I am able enough to have care of my selfe.
6.  On the day following, which was towards the ending of the monethof May, Catharina began to complaine to her Mother that the season wasover-hot and tedious, to be still lodged in her Mothers Chamber,because it was an hinderance to her sleeping; and wanting rest, itwould be an empairing of her health. Why Daughter (quoth the Mother)the weather (as yet) is not so hot, but (in my minde) you may verywell endure it. Alas Mother, saide she, aged people, as you and myFather are, do not feele the heates of youthfull blood, by reason ofyour farre colder complexion, which is not to be measured by youngeryeeres. I know that well Daughter, replyed the Mother; but is it in mypower, to make the weather warme or coole, as thou perhaps wouldsthave it? Seasons are to be suffered, according to their severallqualities; and though the last night might seeme hot, this nextensuing may be cooler, and then thy rest will be the better. NoMother, quoth Catharina, that cannot be; for as Summer proceedethon, so the heate encreaseth, and no expectation can be of temperateweather, untill it groweth to Winter againe. Why Daughter, saide theMother, what wouldest thou have me to do? Mother (quoth she) if itmight stand with my Fathers good liking and yours, I would be sparedfrom the Garden Gallery, which is a great deale more coole lodged.There shall I heare the sweete Nightingale sing, as every night sheuseth to do, and many other pretty Birdes beside, which I cannot dolodging in your Chamber.

应用

1.  Mother (quoth he) if you can do so much for me, as that I may haveFrederigoes Faulcon, I am perswaded, that my sicknesse soone willcease. The Lady hearing this, sate some short while musing to herselfe, and began to consider, what she might best doe to compasseher Sonnes desire: for well she knew, how long a time Frederigo hadmost lovingly kept it, not suffering it ever to be out of his sight.Moreover, shee remembred, how earnest in affection he had bene to her,never thinking himselfe happy, but onely when he was in her company;wherefore, shee entred into this private consultation with her ownethoughts. Shall I send, or goe my selfe in person, to request theFaulcon of him, it being the best that ever flew? It is his onelyJewell of delight, and that taken from him, no longer can he wish tolive in this World. How farre then voyde of understanding shall I shewmy selfe, to rob a Gentleman of his sole felicity, having no other joyor comfort left him? These and the like considerations, wheeledabout her troubled braine, onely in tender care and love to her Sonne,perswading her selfe assuredly, that the Faulcon were her owne, if shewould but request it: yet not knowing whereon it were best to resolve,shee returned no answer to her Sonne, but sate still in her silentmeditations. At the length, love to the youth, so prevailed withher, that she concluded on his contentation, and (come of it whatcould) shee would not send for it; but go her selfe in person torequest it, and then returne home againe with it: whereupon thus shespake. Sonne, comfort thy selfe, and let languishing thoughts nolonger offend thee: for here I promise thee, that the first thing I doto morrow morning, shall bee my journey for the Faulcon, and assurethy selfe, that I will bring it with me. Whereat the youth was sojoyed, that he imagined, his sicknesse began instantly a little toleave him, and promised him a speedy recovery.
2.  It is a matter most convenient (deare Ladies) that a man ought tobegin whatsoever he doth, in the great and glorious name of him, whowas the Creator of all things. Wherefore, seeing that I am the manappointed, to begin this your invention of discoursing Novelties: Iintend to begin also with one of his wonderfull workes. To the end,that this being heard, our hope may remaine on him, as the thing onelypermanent, and his name for ever to be praised by us. Now, as there isnothing more certaine, but that even as temporall things are mortalland transitory, so are they both in and out of themselves, full ofsorrow, paine, and anguish, and subjected to infinite dangers: So inthe same manner, we live mingled among them, seeming as part ofthem, and cannot (without some error) continue or defend our selves,if God by his especiall grace and favour, give us not strength andgood understanding. Which power we may not beleeve, that either itdescendeth to us, or liveth in us, by any merites of our owne; butof his onely most gracious benignity. Mooved neverthelesse andentreated by the intercessions of them, who were (as we are)mortals; and having diligently observed his commandements, are nowwith him in eternall blessednes. To whom (as to advocates andprocurators, informed by the experience of our frailty) wee are not topresent our prayers in the presence of so great a Judge; but onelyto himselfe, for the obtaining of all such things as his wisedomeknoweth to be most expedient for us. And well may we credit, thathis goodnesse is more fully enclined towards us, in his continuallbounty and liberality; then the subtilty of mortall eye, can reachinto the secret of so divine a thought: and sometimes therefore we maybe beguiled in opinion, by electing such and such as our intercessorsbefore his high Majesty, who perhaps are farre off from him, or driveninto perpetuall exile, as unworthy to appeare in so glorious apresence. For he, from whom nothing can be hidden, more regardeththe sincerity of him that prayeth, then ignorant devotion, committedto the trust of a heedlesse intercessor; and such prayers have alwaiesgracious acceptation in his sight. As manifestly will appeare, bythe Novell which I intend to relate; manifestly (I say) not as inthe judgement of God, but according to the apprehension of men.
3.  THE FIFT DAY, THE EIGHTH NOVELL
4、  Bright Beauties, it was the discretion of your late Soveraigne andQueene, in regard of ease and recreation unto your tyred spirits, togrant you free liberty, for discoursing on whatsoever your selves bestpleased: wherefore, having enjoyed such a time of rest, I am ofopinion, that it is best to returne once more to our wonted Law, inwhich respect, I would have every one to speake in this manner tomorrow. Namety, of those men or women, who have done any thingbountifully or magnificently, either in matter of amity, or otherwise.The relation of such worthy arguments, wil (doubtlesse) give anaddition to our very best desires, for a free and forwardinclination to good actions, whereby our lives (how short soeverthey bee) may perpetuate an ever-living renowne and fame, after ourmortall bodies are converted into dust, which (otherwise)
5、  It is not many yeares since (worthy assembly) that in Bulloignethere dwelt a learned Physitian, a man famous for skill, and farrerenowned, whose name was Master Albert, and being growne aged, tothe estimate of threescore and tenne yeares: hee had yet such asprightly disposition, that though naturall heate and vigour had quiteshaken hands with him, yet amorous flames and desires had not whollyforsaken him. Having seene (at a Banquet) a very beautifull woman,being then in the estate of widdowhood, named (as some say) MadamMargaret de Chisolieri, shee appeared so pleasing in his eye; that hissences became no lesse disturbed, then as if he had beene of farreyounger temper, and no night could any quietnesse possesse hissoule, except (the day before) he had seene the sweet countenance ofthis lovely widdow. In regard whereof, his dayly passage was by herdoore, one while on horsebacke, and then againe on foot; as best mightdeclare his plaine purpose to see her.

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网友评论(8hjmgDy339530))

  • 郭习松 08-08

      Now, whether feeding on salt meates before his coming thither, orcustomary use of drinking, which maketh men unable any long while toabstaine as being never satisfied with excesse; which of these twoextreames they were, I know not: but drinke needs he must. And, havingno other meanes for quenching his thirst, espied the glasse of waterstanding in the Window, and thinking it to be some soveraigne kinde ofwater, reserved by the Doctor for his owne drinking, to make him lustyin his old yeeres, he tooke the glasse; and finding the water pleasingto his pallate, dranke it off every drop; then sitting downe on aCoffer by the beds side, soone after he fell into a sound sleepe,according to the powerfull working of the water.

  • 柯提思 08-08

      Sir Simon perceiving, that she would not trust him upon barewords, nor any thing was to be done, without Salvum me fac, whereashis meaning was Sine custodia; thus answered. Well Belcolove, seeingyou dare not credit my bringing the tenne Florines, according to mypromised day: I will leave you a good pawne, my very best Cloake,lyned quite thorough with rich Silke, and made up in the choysestmanner.

  • 向昌海 08-08

       They being provided, some with Prongges, Pitchforkes and Spades, andothers with the like weapons fit for Husbandry, stept into the waybefore Aniolliero: and beleeving undoubtedly, that he had robde theman which pursued him in his shirt, stayed and apprehended him.Whatsoever Aniolliero could doe or say, prevailed not any thing withthe unmannerly Clownes, but when Fortarigo was arrived among them,he braved Aniolliero most impudently, saying.

  • 王烈 08-08

      Within some few yeares after, the Physitian her Father also dyed,and then her desires grew wholly addicted, to visite Paris her selfein person, onely because she would see the young Count, awaiting buttime and opportunitie, to fit her stolne journey thither. But herkindred and friends, to whose care and trust she was committed, inregard of her rich dowrie, and being left as a fatherlesse Orphane:were so circumspect of her walks and daily behaviour, as she could notcompasse any meane; of escaping. Her yeares made her now almost fitfor marriage, which so much more encreased her love to the Count,making refusall of many woorthy husbands, and laboured by themotions of her friends and kindred, yet all denyed, they not knowingany reason for her refusalles. By this time the Count was become agallant goodly Gentleman, and able to make election of his wife,whereby her affections were the more violently enflamed, as fearingleast some other should be preferred before her, and so her hopes beutterly disappointed.

  • 阿特托 08-07

    {  No sooner was he come neere, but they all arose, and courteouslyinvited him to enter with them, conducting him into a goodly Garden,where readily was prepared choyse of delicate wines and banquetting.At length, among other pleasant and delightfull discourses, theydemanded of him; how it was possible for him, to be amorously affectedtowards so beautifull a woman, both knowing and seeing, howearnestly she was sollicited by many gracious, gallant, andyouthfull spirits, aptly suting with her yeares and desires? MasterAlbert perceiving, that they had drawne him in among them, onely toscoffe and make a mockery of him; set a merry countenance on thematter, and honestly thus answered.

  • 唐建阳 08-06

      Jehannot, who expected a farre contrary conclusion then this,hearing him speake it with such constancy; was the very gladdest manin the world, and went with him to the Church of Nostre Dame in Paris,where he requested the Priests there abiding, to bestow baptisme onAbraham, which they joyfully did, hearing him so earnestly to desireit. Jehannot was his Godfather, and named him John, and afterward,by learned Divines he was more fully instructed in the grounds ofour faith; wherein he grew of great understanding, and led a veryvertuous life.}

  • 谭平山 08-06

      Why dost thou behold me so advisedly? Whereunto Nello answered,saying Hast thou felt any paine this last night past? Thou lookestnothing so well, as thou didst yesterday. Calandrino began instantlyto wax doubtfull, and replyed thus. Dost thou see any alteration in myface, whereby to imagine, I should feele some paine? In good faithCalandrino (quoth Nello) me thinks thy countenance is strangelychanged, and surely it proceedeth from some great cause, and so hedeparted away from him.

  • 拉赫达尔·卜拉希米 08-06

      HONOURABLE PHILSTRATUS: AND CONCERNING SUCH

  • 赵祝平 08-05

       You are then to understand (Gracious Auditors) that in Lombardiethere was a goodly Monastery, very famous for Holinesse andReligion, where, among other sanctified Sisters, there was a yongGentlewoman, endued with very singular beautie, being namedIsabella, who on a day, when a Kinsman of hers came to see her atthe grate, became enamored of a young Gentleman, being then in hiscompany.

  • 季红全 08-03

    {  When it was day, and all in the house risen, the hoast began tosmile at Panuccio, mocking him with his idle dreaming and talking inthe night.

  • 尹航 08-03

      In Messina there dwelt three young men, Brethren, and Merchants bytheir common profession, who becomming very rich by the death of theirFather, lived in very good fame and repute. Their Father was of SanGemignano, and they had a Sister named Isabella, young, beautifull,and well conditioned; who upon some occasion, as yet remainedunmarried. A proper youth, being a Gentleman borne in Pisa, andnamed Lorenzo, as a trusty factor or servant, had the managing ofthe brethrens businesse and affaires. This Lorenzo being of comelypersonage, affable, and excellent in his behaviour, grew so graciousin the eyes of Isabella, that she affoorded him many very respectivelookes, yea, kindnesses of no common quality. Which Lorenzo takingnotice of, and observing by degrees from time to time, gave over allother beauties in the City, which might allure any affection from him,and onely fixed his heart on her, so that their love grew to a mutuallembracing, both equally respecting one another, and entertainingkindnesses, as occasion gave leave.

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